3 Essential Latin Beats

kzdruma

Senior Member
I teach lessons to many of the older competing jazz drummers in the area and world/ethnic beats are a big part of what I teach. I love teaching these and think that they are very important, but I have a student that does not feel the same way. I will respect his wishes and not spend “too much” time going over Latin styles. I have him talked into learning 3 different beats.

Now I am struggling with which ones to go over with him. As of right now, I am thinking that I will do the Bossa Novas, Samba, and the Mozambique. What do you guys think?

If you could only know 3 Latin beats what would you like to know?
 

groove1

Silver Member
I suppose I would teach what they actually will use on their gigs. I tend to agree with your
3 selections but having said that, I play gigs where we play bossa nova's, sambas, but no
mozambiques. In that case it might be better to have taught merengue (which we do play).
There was a time when I would have included cha-cha as one of the 3 but that seems to be
passe generally for the audiences I play to.

What is expected from drummers today with regard to understanding and playing
afro-cuban and brazilian rhythms is worlds apart from what it was 40-50 years ago. Most of
the young drummers I'm around can play authentic parts to many of the diverse rhythms used. Way back when, cha-cha, bossa nova, mambo and samba would get you by generally
(where I played anyways).
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I think you should slap your student and tell him that leaning any beat will help with all the rest of them and give him more options overall.

That aside, I think your list is fine. I'm still an advocate of the slap route to teaching, though.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Ask your student which styles HE wants to learn, since you're catering to him so well already. :)

Really, with my students, I essentially cram it down their throats because they are resistant to the idea of learning Latin grooves. Once we delve into one or two, they are hungry for more...
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Ask your student which styles HE wants to learn, since you're catering to him so well already. :)

Really, with my students, I essentially cram it down their throats because they are resistant to the idea of learning Latin grooves. Once we delve into one or two, they are hungry for more...

I have the same experience

once they get a mambo, samba, or a songo under their belts they quickly realize these are providing them with feel and independence that they did not have before learning them

once I show them how to apply what they just learned into a style that they prefer playing they just about insist on learning more of these rhythms
 

kzdruma

Senior Member
I suppose I would teach what they actually will use on their gigs. I tend to agree with your 3 selections but having said that, I play gigs where we play bossa nova's, sambas, but no mozambiques. In that case it might be better to have taught merengue (which we do play). There was a time when I would have included cha-cha as one of the 3 but that seems to be passe generally for the audiences I play to.
I like the idea of teaching what they will use on their gigs, but for a lot of my students this will not work. They need to be able to play whatever comes up. They do not get to choose the songs they will be playing like a lot of us do. This definitely presents a frustrating problem.

What is expected from drummers today with regard to understanding and playing afro-cuban and brazilian rhythms is worlds apart from what it was 40-50 years ago. Most of the young drummers I'm around can play authentic parts to many of the diverse rhythms used. Way back when, cha-cha, bossa nova, mambo and samba would get you by generally (where I played anyways).
This is true, but really a great thing. As I am sure you understand, this doesn’t only enable us to play these grooves when needed, but enables us to use the independence and style we learn from it in all of our playing.

Hey! What ever happened to the Cha-Cha. I used to play this groove a lot, but not lately… Hmm…

Ask your student which styles HE wants to learn, since you're catering to him so well already. :)

Really, with my students, I essentially cram it down their throats because they are resistant to the idea of learning Latin grooves. Once we delve into one or two, they are hungry for more...
A lot of my students are very resistant to learning anything Latin as well. Most of them grow to love it, but some just can’t be done fast enough, which is not that fast because they don’t practice it as much as they should if they are not enjoying it.

Once I show them how to apply what they just learned into a style that they prefer playing they just about insist on learning more of these rhythms
This is a great idea. I think that I really need to work on teaching them how they can use this in everyday playing rather than keeping it so isolated. Thanks!
 

Chunky

Silver Member
I think you should slap your student and tell him that leaning any beat will help with all the rest of them and give him more options overall.

That aside, I think your list is fine. I'm still an advocate of the slap route to teaching, though.
Yeah, I'd go with the slap approach!

Personally I can't imagine not wanting to learn more latin grooves.

If that doesn't work poke him in the eye!
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
As of right now, I am thinking that I will do the Bossa Novas, Samba, and the Mozambique.
Who knows, maybe any time with it at all is "too much" for him. If you're smooth about it you can slip him the samba and bossa nova together as one thing, and then give him a generic mambo-type feel (the one I use and teach has the Mozambique bell pattern), and a 6/8-- naningo, bembe, whatever you want to call it. I'd also give him a lesson on the reasons you learn things, even when you think you don't want to learn them.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
In his book Groove Essentials 2.0, Tommy Igoe demonstrates an "all-purpose" latin beat that would be a good introduction into those grooves. It' groove 82 if you have the book or DVD.
 

cp84

Senior Member
samba and bossa are good. i'd show a mambo or a guaguanco over a mozambique. something in 6/8 could also be useful although i can't ever say i've used it in a band setting (but i probably just don't play out enough).
 

groove1

Silver Member
"This is true, but really a great thing. As I am sure you understand, this doesn’t only enable us to play these grooves when needed, but enables us to use the independence and style we learn from it in all of our playing.

Hey! What ever happened to the Cha-Cha. I used to play this groove a lot, but not lately…hmm"


I agree completely that it is a great thing and am spending a lot of time practicing and studying these wonderful rhythms so I too can play them with accuracy.
 
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jeffwj

Platinum Member
Imagine this,

A piano student says, "I don't want to learn minor scales, minor chords, or play any minor tunes." What would the piano teacher say in response?

Jeff
 
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