1st jam; tune confusion? "Further on up the Road" & "Key to the Highway"

KJIB

Member
So (even after so long) I'm essentially still a beginner (still on grade 2 Trinity stuff) and I went to an open rock jam for the 1st time a few days ago. They paired me with some great guys on guitar & bass and counted me in. They'd already told me that a 4/4 back beat would be adequate so that was fine and the jam went OK (for a 1st go at it), I was v nervous but will do it again, (such a great bunch of people).

Now I want to improve what I can do with those two Clapton tunes, ("Further on up the Road" & "Key to the Highway"), but I've not found consensus on what tempo or signature (4/4 or 12/8) each tune is. Knowing the "correct" tempo is less important as I was counted in. What's the signature for the drum parts?

I also couldn't find a drum sheet music on-line for these. I have attempted to use this on-line tool to work out the crux of the drum part and you can try mine or fix my version here (and the tool updates the link in your browser with your changes which you might then post as an answer).
(hopefully it's OK to post a drumming specific link - delete if not admin, sorry):
https://www.mikeslessons.com/groove...x---x-xx--|&S=|---O-O---O-O|&K=|o-----o-----|

1666456793816.png

I thought both tune have a similar "feel" (one a tad quicker). Hopefully I'm not too far off the mark, like I said, I'm still learning :)
 
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jda

Silver Member
Un Bonus They just Might call:


That was. Is what is known as. "The Boogie..

(we opened every gig from 1971 to 75 with it) a Drag to hammer
"and the crowd said boogie,"
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
12/8 or 4/4 are both considered correct, as long as the 4/4 has a note at the top that it’s a swing or shuffle. It’s become a thing to write them in 4/4 with a note because it’s easier than writing a whole bunch of dotted notes.
 

KJIB

Member
So, I played along to the YouTube Clapton video again and I've now, (I think), worked what I actually did at the jam. It's kind of like the experienced guitar players being bang on the (correct) beat helped me to play a shuffle within the time it took to play about 1 bar. Being a beginner, when I count, if I "say" the count in my head, I feel the need to hit something & if I keep that bit of the count quiet then I will struggle to strike. I'd started off trying to play triplets and count them but it's as if the stronger sound of the guitars led me to drop the "an" (of 1-an-a etc.). I then thought it had gone wrong but sounded OK & in the heat of the (jam) moment, however, I thought I was now doing 4/4 with 8ths. (Yes, I now realise that the & in an 8ths position would sound strange in 12/8). Light bulb goes on... I was actually shifting the & count of my "8ths" to the "a" of triplets (which by some strange stroke of 1st jam luck seems to have been about right).

1666703092655.png

So that 1st jam almost instantly taught me a basic shuffle which might have normally taken me, (poor olde learner with a pickled brain that I am), days to really get on my own.

The power of a jam, I'd heard that they could be good for your playing but, wow... 🤩
 
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larryace

"Uncle Larry" - Administrator
Staff member
12/8...I count 1 trip let 2 trip let 3 trip let 4 trip let


12/8 is the beat I use in a "slow blues" song
 

KJIB

Member
12/8...I count 1 trip let 2 trip let 3 trip let 4 trip let


12/8 is the beat I use in a "slow blues" song
Yes, that. Except, as a learner, I'm finding it excruciatingly tricky if I "say" the counts that I am not playing. If I say it, it tend to find it hard not to hit it.

So, I count full triplets like this: 1 an a, 2 an a, 3 an a, 4 an a...

But in order to play the shuffle I find myself having to "say" in my count 1 - a, 2 - a, 3 - a, 4 - a...
Except where I might want to slip in a triplet fill with something like 4-an-a

I have started finding times when I need to count the silent bits to play other things correctly. I expect I shall have to learn to disconnect what my mouth is doing from what my limbs are doing :eek: I "just" need to learn mouth independence :unsure:
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
Yes, that. Except, as a learner, I'm finding it excruciatingly tricky if I "say" the counts that I am not playing. If I say it, it tend to find it hard not to hit it.

So, I count full triplets like this: 1 an a, 2 an a, 3 an a, 4 an a...

But in order to play the shuffle I find myself having to "say" in my count 1 - a, 2 - a, 3 - a, 4 - a...
Except where I might want to slip in a triplet fill with something like 4-an-a

I have started finding times when I need to count the silent bits to play other things correctly. I expect I shall have to learn to disconnect what my mouth is doing from what my limbs are doing :eek: I "just" need to learn mouth independence :unsure:
It gets easier the more you do it, and one day soon it’ll be automatic. And the stuff that’s throwing you now will be old hat. Just takes a little time and practice.
 

KJIB

Member
It gets easier the more you do it, and one day soon it’ll be automatic. And the stuff that’s throwing you now will be old hat. Just takes a little time and practice.
I will look forward to that. Right now I was just wondering what would happen to the sticks if I tried to play, count & sing at the same time. Something surreal 🤯
 
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