19th nervous breakdown/Stones

stevo

Senior Member
All of a sudden, I am locked on this tune. I think it's the 16th note ride on the cymbal. After all these years, now this song is stuck, and I am having a ball playing it.
 

Pachikara-Tharakan

Silver Member
I dig Charley Watts....he stands out with that careless but carefull drumming....sometime i feel like he is going to mess it up but he never mess up.....
 

BillRayDrums

Gold Member
It's what we call a "two beat". BOOM CHICK BOOM CHICK

You can throw the 8ths in, but they will fit better if you apply them like a "half shuffle" as in swing them only part of the way.

See, back in the beginnings of Rock & Roll the drummers would play what amounted to a swing feel. Little Richard came along and took his drummer Charles Connor down to the train station and said "I want my music to have that beat", the steady chug of what we now know as "straight eighths".

With this new rhythm, the drummers of the day, in an effort to "stay current" had to learn to "straighten out their swing". The end result for many of those who recorded the hits of the day ("Blue Suede Shoes" by Elvis is a prime example), the swing element was still there but it was somewhat to a lesser degree.

So the two beat. Simple as pie. 1 2 1 2 on the hihat, 1 on the kick, 2 on the snare. Make that groove and you have a 19th nervous breakdown, along with the neighbors! :D
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Agreed.That tune,as Charlie plays it, is a half time shuffle,and Mr Watts swings the crap out of it.The groove is pretty deep

Steve B
 

BillRayDrums

Gold Member
Agreed.That tune,as Charlie plays it, is a half time shuffle,and Mr Watts swings the crap out of it.The groove is pretty deep

Steve B
Careful the terminology! "Half time shuffle" implies that the snare is on "3". This would be a "half shuffle" in that the "rounding" of the eighth note is not completely swung but also not completely straight.

OK... if there were G.I Joe and G.I. Jane, this would be G.I. Don't Know. :D
 
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