1965 Slingerland Snare

FreDrummer

Silver Member
Finally, I can start one of those, "Look at the great deal I got" threads...

Because it was FREE! A friend of mine (a non-drummer) has been telling me for over a year now he had an old snare drum his parents had left him. It had been in his garage the last 20 years. I remember him telling me it was a "Sling-something" or "Slingy" and it also said "Ohio" on it. Do you mean, "Slingerland?" Yeah, that's it. Well, I finally got my hands on it last week and cleaned it up. This was supposed to be one of those triumphant, "This snare's been in closets/garages the last 30 years and is now making music in front of people again," threads, but, alas, our gig tonight was canceled by an April Colorado snow storm. So, I will simply share what I've got.

Here is the condition as I received it:
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Dating it and finding out what it was was pretty easy:
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I did not do a painstaking weeks-long restoration to make it like new. Rather, I simply cleaned it up as best I could and glued a crack in the batter side re-ring. Nice components. Although "only" a 6-lug "Deluxe Student Model" snare, the hoops appear to be original rimshot rims (COB - a magnet will not stick to them), and the lugs are non-magnetic as well (brass?). The bearing edges were in good shape and definitely of the roundover variety. It tuned up nicely and will be a nice drum.

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opentune

Platinum Member
great find and lovely cleanup job. Sure its a 6 lug, but that drum will be nice, open and mellow at lowish tunings. 1965 was a 'good year'....every old Slingerland I've refurbished with that year sounds special.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Great find !!

Yeah I have the exact same drum but from 1964. Great sounding drum.
Woody and mellow. I use it for the blues.

I think the 6 lug might even sound better than the 8 lug. Who wants more hardware on their snare drum anyway?


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FreDrummer

Silver Member
Yes, I know. There's this pre-conception that a 10 lug will tune up easier than an 8 lug, which will, in turn, tune up easier than...

I have had no problem getting this drum tuned up. If anything, with only 6 lugs, the process is quicker. Jim, how does yours do staying in tune? I REALLY wish I could have tried it out at a gig tonight!

Like most of the drums from the major manufacturers of the era, I am impressed by the overall construction quality. After cleaning up/lubing the tension rods, they all line up nicely and spin freely, making tuning a breeze.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Jim, how does yours do staying in tune? I REALLY wish I could have tried it out at a gig tonight!
Mine stays in tune just fine. Two reasons:
I think mine was rarely used. It was found in an estate sale along with a very slightly used drum set. The wrap was cracked, but the tension rods screw in nice and tight in the lugs. Also I only play it with blues bands. So I don't pound on it like a metal drummer would.

I have a 1926-1928 Ludwig metal snare and the tension rods are a little loose in the lugs. So when I pound out the rock and roll on it, it goes out of tune after a four hour gig. I solved that with some new "Tight Screws" tension rods. No more going out of tune problem.

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force3005

Silver Member
Hi FreDrummer, what a nice find. What type of wires did you use on your new find? And thanks for the pics.
 

MoreBeer

Silver Member
Nice job with the clean up. Those are classic drums from a foregone era.

That was the first real drum I ever owned. In 1965 at 5 years old, my parents bought me a new blue sparkle Slingerland snare. Although I can't say for sure, it was probably the student model such as yours. My uncle then dug up an old cymbal and stand of some sort and I banged on those for a few years.
 

eamesuser

Silver Member
I used one of those for a few months on a swap,nice sounding drum,it was tuned med high and held just fine,like Jim said great shuffle drum for blues,good all around IMO.
 

FreDrummer

Silver Member
Mine stays in tune just fine. Two reasons:
I think mine was rarely used. It was found in an estate sale along with a very slightly used drum set. .
That was the case with this one, too. My friend's dad used to restore old pianos. Not fancy stuff, but inexpensive, beat-up uprights he would buy for $20-30, then spend six months restoring and then selling. He didn't do it to make money, just the joy of restoring something. BTW, he couldn't play a lick on piano. Anyway, the story of this drum is, for entertainment back in the 70's, his parents would get together on Saturday nights with other couples and they would sing and make music...maybe a guitar, someone who could play piano, and this drum (not a drumset...just the snare drum). So, yes, it was very lightly used. I'd guess it has spent most of its 51 years in a closet or my bud's garage.

...What type of wires did you use on your new find? And thanks for the pics.
It's still a work in progress. For now, I used something I had around: a set of 20-strand Puresounds I removed some of the inner wires from (sort of a home-made Equalizer type). Seeing as the original came with only 12-wire ( They were not on the drum when I got it), I would think a 16-wire should work good. Personally, I never have any problem getting plenty of snare response and sensitivity with the 16-20 strand snare wires on any of the snares I own. The beds are fairly wide and deep. Any thoughts on what will work best? Would this drum come from the factory with the Radio King-style wires (with a single hole for the string to go through)? If so, how did that design work?

That was the first real drum I ever owned. In 1965 at 5 years old, my parents bought me a new blue sparkle Slingerland snare. Although I can't say for sure, it was probably the student model such as yours. My uncle then dug up an old cymbal and stand of some sort and I banged on those for a few years.
Cool story. Thanks for sharing!
 

force3005

Silver Member
Hey FreDrummer, from what I can find in my Slingerland books and catalogs is that it looks like it came with standard 14 strand wire using rope. I would use Pursound Equalizers wires also. I have used them in the past and presently using a set on one of my snares. They do work with help in damping of snare buzz and in the one I am using it on now it has a cleaner sound to it. If I remember right Pursound makes two types, 16 & 20 strand sets don’t quote me on this. Let us know how it sounds with your band.
 

FreDrummer

Silver Member
Yes, you're correct about the Equalizers...in fact, I think they even make a 12-strand set (6+6). Today I tuned the drum up a little differently and put some Puresound Blasters on there with a low tuning. Sounds pretty good!

I've been leery of the Blasters because of the way the endplates are angled down into the drumhead. I've even had a set tear into my snare reso at the corner of this down-angled endplate on another drum. So, I bent the corners up slightly with a pair of pliers (the material is quite soft), and it works great (and I don't have to worry about my reso anymore).

I spent the morning replacing the straps on most my snares with some grosgrain ribbon I just bought. I love that stuff. I even use it on the buttplate end of my snares that require string on the strainer end (this Slingy, P-85 Ludwigs). As I was doing it, I thought, "Dayum! I've got some nice sounding snares here." No Gurus or anything exotic, no "different" sizes, but I'm pretty happy with them and can cover quite a bit of ground:

5 x 14 70's Supra
5 x 14 70's Acro
5 x 14 70's Vistalite
5.5 x 14 Slingerland Deluxe Student Model
5.5 x 14 Pearl Masters (maple)
6.5 x 14 Pearl Free Floater (1st Gen, steel and maple shells)
6.5 x 14 Pearl Sensitone Elite Brass
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
My favorite snare drum of all of the snare drums that I own is my 1965 Slingerland Artist model single ply with 8 lugs and a Zoomatic strainer.
 
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