In search of a (different) online beginner drum course.

rabimeat

Member
I am looking for a website with a good structured plan for learning how to play the drums for (almost absolute) beginners, I've tried Drumeo and HATED it.
I'm looking for somewhere online that is organized in a way that i could easily find lessons that match my level. I would like to be able to pick my 'level' or whatever they'll call it and it would have :
Lessons about techniques/general ideas that i should know (keep in mind that i am a beginner so pretty much everything is new and interesting for me)
Lessons that shows how to practice those techniques
Lessons that shows/teaches playing a song using those techniques.
Basically i want to be able to login, find a new thing to learn, and get an instructive description on how to learn,practice, and apply it.

What i don't want (Yes, Drumeo, i am looking at you) is an unending stream of videos that means nothing to me, tough by people so full of themselves they forgot someone is actually listening to them. (I.e: have you tried our lesson on 6/8 modern jazz for the absolute beginner?, Maybe you'd like to learn how to spice up your 16 notes high-hat sounds? How about you listen to someone talking for two hours about how to be a """""good sounding rock drummer"""""). I want to quickly and simply pick the next lesson that is right for me. i don't need to learn everything - i just need it to always have something appropriate to teach me.

.......
Some questions you might have -
I love learning alone. I might go to a tutor somewhere down the line but i don't want to at this time. It's easier and more fun for me to self learn (Although, after reading this post, i know it might not look like it).
I don't expect being 'good' (whatever that means) very fast and i am very comfortable with setting my own pace. As long as there is something new i can learn and practice - it's fun for me. Learning is fun, music is fun. It's all about the journey or whatever.
I bought an electronic drum set (Roland TD-1DMK) and i would do all my practicing/learning in my home.
 
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BruceW

Senior Member
Drumeo is massive, and that's just the free stuff. I can't imagine the library at your disposal if you sign up. That having been said, I understand where you are coming from. Knowing what to study and/or practice, to the best use of your available time, will be a challenge. Likely with most any online provider, I expect, not just Drumeo. They're simply the biggest example.

Online learning has changed the game, versus an in-person instructor. I expect that you will get a large number of replies saying that you should be looking for in-person instruction, and they aren't wrong. But that doesn't mean that you can't find great ways to learn online, as well. The trick, as you've found, is the structure.

I wish you luck. Report back if you find something that you like, I'm interested myself. I have found that I haven't jumped in to a lot of online material for much the same reason...trying to figure out where to begin :) Of course, it can't hurt to try and learn "anything", its just what to do when time is limited.
 

rabimeat

Member
Drumeo is massive, and that's just the free stuff. I can't imagine the library at your disposal if you sign up. That having been said, I understand where you are coming from. Knowing what to study and/or practice, to the best use of your available time, will be a challenge. Likely with most any online provider, I expect, not just Drumeo. They're simply the biggest example.

Online learning has changed the game, versus an in-person instructor. I expect that you will get a large number of replies saying that you should be looking for in-person instruction, and they aren't wrong. But that doesn't mean that you can't find great ways to learn online, as well. The trick, as you've found, is the structure.

I wish you luck. Report back if you find something that you like, I'm interested myself. I have found that I haven't jumped in to a lot of online material for much the same reason...trying to figure out where to begin :) Of course, it can't hurt to try and learn "anything", its just what to do when time is limited.

I think the main problem with trying to teach everything (for every concept, not just music), specially for beginners, is that i find myself with no 'fixed point'. I'd like to be able to understand what i'm learning and where i am heading for. You can't do that with 10000 available lessons for beginners. there is no way that after learning what are quarter and eight notes i would be interested in learning 99.9% of those. Show me how to apply the simple stuff i learned, show me how people already did that, show me a different way to look at it or some fun way i can play around with it. I would expect someone with decades of experience to be able to give me some good and fun ways to apply simple ideas, and not just spout out 10000 more ideas
 

danondrums

Well-known member
I don't believe such a website exists. The craft is far too vast and everyone's goals vary to such a high degree that there will likely never be a single, one stop resource for "how to learn drumming."

The most important time to get a teacher and have one-on-one instruction is the very beginning where you're training the muscle memory to do what you want it to do. Without an expert coaching you on relaxed hands, loose grip, accuracy and teaching how to dissect drum parts and learn how to develop limb independence you're setting yourself up for needing to relearn a slew of bad habits down the road, or capping your potential at a low level.

Before the internet, the self-taught players listened to records and played along to their favorite tunes. That's usually all it takes to go bang some drums in a bar band if that's all you're after. If you're after more, you should rethink your current approach.
 

Alex Sanguinetti

Silver Member
What I offer you are ON LINE LESSONS LIVE, it´s like taking private drum lessons, and all the lessons are considering your level and interests (the lesson also can have a specific focus you are interested not necesarely be a course, or if you want too. Example, some students want to know about certain guys fills, etc.).

I have been teaching over 40 years and I¨m wellknown teacher in Europe, USA and other places PLUS I´m wellknown player.

You only pay for each lesson you take, no course, fee, anything.

I suggest you try one lesson.

Each lesson of one hour is 29 Euro (around 30 dollars)

VIDEOS OF ME:


1) Rudiments /Snare


2) Jazz - UP Swing Solos (12):


3) VIDEO OF 9 STUDENTS (9 students and me playing Uptempo Jazz at 10:35):


List of students if you want to jump on the previous video:
0:06 Adrián Yori 1:46 Javier Foppiano 2:25 Fernando Dieguez 3:11 Federico Beltro 4:05 Edgardo Vallarino 4:31 Bertram Lehmann 4:51 Marcelo Novati 8:05 Jota Morelli 8:45 José Antonio García Pérez 10: 37 Me, Alex Sanguinetti

If you would like more information: alexsanguinetti@yahoo.com

Best regards!
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
You’re learning a musical instrument, not tying your shoelaces. Put the videos away.

i don't need to learn everything - i just need it to always have something appropriate to teach me.

Such a website doesn’t — and won’t ever — exist, and that’s why there are teachers in the world, in every field and area of study. It may surprise you to learn that teaching is much more than giving information to someone. It’s about filtering that information according to the student’s goals and abilities. And that s#!t is not easy.

So get with a teacher, for five years straight. After six months to a year, buy acoustic kit and get with a band — any band at all that will have you. Supplement your real education with videos, but don’t expect to replace it.
Any time you spend teaching yourself, for the first three years at least, is a waste. Forget self-study, for now (I don’t think I learned anything valuable by myself, from a video or experimenting, until I had been playing for 5 years). Go to your local music shop, sign up for lessons, and develop a rapport with a local expert, in person. Become a drummer.
 

blinky

Senior Member
Inside Drumeo there is actually one great course by Bruce Becker. I'm not sure if it's open for registration though. It consists of 26 lessons ranging from different grips, postures, rudiments, different hand techniques like Moeller and push-pull, bass drum technique, afro-cuban grooves and more, everything organized in a step-by-step way. Highly recommended, but as I mentioned I'm unsure if the course is available at the moment.
 
The best book (in my opinion) that deals with pretty much all the important things: http://www.mwpublications.com/shop/a-fresh-approach-to-the-drum-set/
Have a look at the PDF and the videos that come with the book. It's a lot of material and the order of topics is good. I think it doesn't hurt to own such a compendium but also look for a teacher to avoid bad habits and rushing through the material. If you can't afford regular lessons, a single monthly lesson with a great teacher is still extremely helpful!
 

BonsaiMagpie

Junior Member
Mike Jonston offered personal tutoring in his online course. He advertises himself as an online drum teacher rather than a video poster, which is something he claims is unique. I haven't subscribed and I certainly cannot verify his claims, but I do like his youtube lessons and the meinl products he has helped develop. Might be worth a look.
https://www.mikeslessons.com
 

rabimeat

Member
You’re learning a musical instrument, not tying your shoelaces. Put the videos away.



Such a website doesn’t — and won’t ever — exist, and that’s why there are teachers in the world, in every field and area of study. It may surprise you to learn that teaching is much more than giving information to someone. It’s about filtering that information according to the student’s goals and abilities. And that s#!t is not easy.

So get with a teacher, for five years straight. After six months to a year, buy acoustic kit and get with a band — any band at all that will have you. Supplement your real education with videos, but don’t expect to replace it.
Any time you spend teaching yourself, for the first three years at least, is a waste. Forget self-study, for now (I don’t think I learned anything valuable by myself, from a video or experimenting, until I had been playing for 5 years). Go to your local music shop, sign up for lessons, and develop a rapport with a local expert, in person. Become a drummer.

Well, you are obviously a teacher, and you have a very specific mind set.
I am not looking to be an expert, I am not looking to play in a band, I am not looking for someone to spoon feed me anything.
"Real education" - what the hell is that? People have been self teaching themselves everything, forever. I understand you think drumming should be taught in a specific way but the truth is that anything can be learnt in so many ways. You won't believe how much can a person learn just from listening to someone play and thinking "I can do that".
I asked for something, and your reply was basically "your way is stupid, this is the right way". Well, that is a very constrictive way for seeing life.
 

rabimeat

Member
Mike Jonston offered personal tutoring in his online course. He advertises himself as an online drum teacher rather than a video poster, which is something he claims is unique. I haven't subscribed and I certainly cannot verify his claims, but I do like his youtube lessons and the meinl products he has helped develop. Might be worth a look.
https://www.mikeslessons.com

Thanks! Will check that one as well!
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
You won't believe how much can a person learn just from listening to someone play and thinking "I can do that".

I've seen this routinely, for many years. This is one of the best reasons to be in the same room with a teacher. Video is okay; in-person is much better.

These two statements are at odds:
I am not looking for someone to spoon feed me anything
i just need it to always have something appropriate to teach me.

This statement...
I am not looking to play in a band
This is fine of course. You can aspire to be a solo artist, YouTube drummer, and so on -- nothing wrong with that. But playing with other people will teach you things that cannot be learned by yourself. Even with play-alongs, etc. I know it's hard to see this, from your perspective.

People have been self teaching themselves everything, forever.

Of course this is true. But self-teaching is best done after you have a good set of fundamentals to build upon. Developing those fundamental skills is best left to the teacher-student scenario. And a video can't correct your technique or adjust your posture, or choose the right speed to play along with you at the same time, or get you to count rhythms out loud, and on and on. There's a giant mountain of stuff that happens in a lesson. But you seem determined to not give it a chance, despite the vast numbers of drummers who have studied this way. Why on earth would you deliberately ignore the path that so many others have found worthwhile?

My worry is that you'll get some (decently tailored) online lessons, get bored after a few months, and/or run out of money (in person Skype lessons, which can be very good, can also get expensive), and hang it up. I'd much rather you see enjoy the drums for a very long time. Not only will you learn the drums; you will learn how to learn.

Most of my students I teach for many years. It's awesome.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
People have been self teaching themselves everything, forever. I understand you think drumming should be taught in a specific way but the truth is that anything can be learnt in so many ways.

Your first statement is demonstrably false - one person having taught another person one thing at one time is proof of that.

Your second statement ignores the general consensus that there is usually a right way and a wrong way, a better way and a worse way, and an easy way and a hard way of doing things.

Drums happen to be one of the things that have a right or better or easy way of learning. For every drummer who has taught themselves to play drums on their own, there are many more drummers who have taught themselves the wrong, worse or hard way, usually resulting in limited abilities or, worse, injury.

If you can step back from yourself for a moment, try to understand that, for the most part, the people responding to your posts here are not doing it out of selfish or dogmatic reasons, but out of a genuine desire to help you be the best drummer you can be, and have cultivated their opinions over years of experience and observation. Simply put, the drums are a bit of a contradiction; while they may be a "simple" instrument to play, they are not "easy" to play - developing proper mechanics is something that takes a lot of time and effort, and can easily go wrong at any time during the learning process as you become more proficient. That is why a teacher is so important, especially in the early stages of learning to drum.

In the end, you're going to do what you want to do. But, if you do go it alone, don't be surprised if in 6 months from now you find yourself not getting any better or developing physical problems and putting your drums in the garage to collect dust or up for sale.

YT may be good for showing me how to unclog my sink, but I wouldn't rely on it to teach me how to pole vault.
 
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