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  #1  
Old 09-01-2012, 02:10 AM
AllTheCoolNamesAreTaken AllTheCoolNamesAreTaken is offline
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Default Why two overhead mics?

I'm looking to record my drums (my band wants to make a demo ... tape? disc? what do they call them now?). After looking around a bit I decided it probably makes the most sense to get some overhead mics, play with those for a while, and then get drum-specific mics to fill in any gaps.

So I've been reading about mics and mic placement, and one thing strikes me as odd. A lot of people who use two overhead mics recommend placing them very close to each other. And I don't really get that. Doesn't that defeat the purpose of having two mics?

Do two overhead mics really make that much of a difference anyway? If not, I'd rather save the money and just get one, then use the saved money on the kit mics if I still need them.

Can anybody explain this stuff?

Thanks!
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Old 09-01-2012, 07:13 AM
audiotech
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Default Re: Why two overhead mics?

It all depends on what you want you final product to be. I always use two overhead microphones with a placement of a spaced stereo pair. When you see two overheads that are fairly close together, they're usually set-up as an X/Y configuration. Here the left microphone is looking at the right side of the kit and the right microphone is seeing the left side. Being in close proximity to one another, this will alleviate most phasing problems you might encounter but it will also limit the definitive width of the stereo image.

Critical placement of any microphone on the kit is essential for best sonic representation of the drums sound.

Dennis
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Old 09-02-2012, 08:44 AM
AllTheCoolNamesAreTaken AllTheCoolNamesAreTaken is offline
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Default Re: Why two overhead mics?

Thanks for the reply. I think I'm catching on ... I'm just curious, is full phasing cancellation desirable? For example, is it preferable to have two hypercardioid mics or just two cardioid mics? As I said, I would like to use the condensors first, and then maybe buy some kit mics if necessary. Would the same type work in both situations?
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Old 09-13-2012, 10:07 PM
mikel mikel is offline
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Default Re: Why two overhead mics?

You might be refering to the "Glyn Johns Method".

Try a search, It explains one of the overhead mic methods.
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  #5  
Old 09-13-2012, 10:16 PM
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BacteriumFendYoke BacteriumFendYoke is offline
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Default Re: Why two overhead mics?

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllTheCoolNamesAreTaken View Post
Thanks for the reply. I think I'm catching on ... I'm just curious, is full phasing cancellation desirable? For example, is it preferable to have two hypercardioid mics or just two cardioid mics? As I said, I would like to use the condensors first, and then maybe buy some kit mics if necessary. Would the same type work in both situations?
Right.

Phase cancellation is not usually desirable. It occurs when there's a difference in distance from the sound source to the capsule in two or more microphones. If you think of sound as waves (peaks and troughs) phase cancellation is what happens when two waves interact and the peak coincides with the trough of the other wave. When these waves are summed together, you actually end up with a reduction in the summed amplitude (volume) at certain frequencies.

A basic rule of thumb is to always have your two microphones equidistant from the loudest source. On the kit, that's usually the snare. That absolutely works. If you have the distance out even slightly it can cause phase cancellation. Sometimes it's not an issue but sometimes it really can be an issue.

In terms of micing the kit, cardioid would be the standard for overheads. Hyper-cardioid have the same basic pickup pattern at the front but the back has a 'narrower' width of pickup. In this situation, it's pretty much splitting hairs between the two. I would not recommend omnidirectional mics unless you know what you're doing as they are more liable to a range of issues.
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