DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussion forum for all drum related topics. Use this forum to exchange ideas and information with your fellow drummers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 01-04-2012, 06:09 PM
resohead's Avatar
resohead resohead is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 526
Default Music, drumming and mental illness

I hesitant to post this but I know a lot of artists struggle with this and many don't know it.

I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder years ago. I'm always on meds and in therapy. Even with advances in treatment the depression side of the disease can shut you down at any time. It's the reason I've had years go by without playing or caring.

Three months ago my doc added a med to my combo. A week later I was dusting off the practice pad and metronome. Two weeks later I did a major cleaning on my modest Yamaha kit and replaced all the heads.

Next came a stationary bike for cardio.

Somehow my life returned before I recognized what was happening.

I know mental illness, depression, anxiety, etc and I've seen what it can do. I just have to be grateful for this day and hope for more like it but I'll always be looking over my shoulder because I know how fast it all can be taken away.

Maybe some here can relate.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-04-2012, 06:43 PM
bigiainw's Avatar
bigiainw bigiainw is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Scotland
Posts: 982
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by resohead View Post
I hesitant to post this but I know a lot of artists struggle with this and many don't know it.

I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder years ago. I'm always on meds and in therapy. Even with advances in treatment the depression side of the disease can shut you down at any time. It's the reason I've had years go by without playing or caring.

Three months ago my doc added a med to my combo. A week later I was dusting off the practice pad and metronome. Two weeks later I did a major cleaning on my modest Yamaha kit and replaced all the heads.

Next came a stationary bike for cardio.

Somehow my life returned before I recognized what was happening.

I know mental illness, depression, anxiety, etc and I've seen what it can do. I just have to be grateful for this day and hope for more like it but I'll always be looking over my shoulder because I know how fast it all can be taken away.

Maybe some here can relate.
Absolutely, and perhaps a renewed interest in things percussive can assist in maintaining your current recovery and give you a continued interest that will support you over the coming months.

Best of luck and I hope that things continue in this positive vein for you.
__________________
www.theshineonline.co.uk
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-04-2012, 07:04 PM
Drummertist's Avatar
Drummertist Drummertist is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 605
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

I have ADD so I tend to hyper-focus (actual word) on things I like and antifocus on things that don't interest me. Did horrible in school and was depressed and suicidal while a teenager. I started playing drums when I was 20 and it calms me down helps me see what in front of me.
__________________
DRüMMER+IST
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-04-2012, 07:24 PM
larryace's Avatar
larryace larryace is offline
"Uncle Larry"
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In beautiful Bucks County, PA
Posts: 13,879
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

My wife was mis diagnosed with bipolar, and for years she (and I) were miserable because of all the meds she had to take. I always knew those things were poisonous for her and encouraged her to not take them. Long story short, now she has not been on anything at all for close to 18 months and guess what? She wasn't bipolar in the first place. Now she is a normally functioning human being with normal episodes of ups and downs, not exaggerated episodes of ups and downs. There's a lot more to this story how she was able to get off the meds in the first place, but she's off them and now she has her life back.

I don't trust the medical profession. If you need to set a bone, or need an antibiotic OK. But beyond that, It's in their best interest to keep you sick. Don't get me started on this topic. She was on so many different drugs...They don't want to heal away a source of income....it's sickening, literally.

I can't speak intelligently about your situation, so I will with hold any comments other than to say I'm glad that you seem to be feeling better, and to encourage you to keep drumming in your life. It will help keep you on track.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-04-2012, 07:25 PM
larryz's Avatar
larryz larryz is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,911
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Sorry to hear about things, but I relate. I'll be blunt though - all doctors know how to do is push drugs instead of trying to deal with the underlying cause. It could be a nutritional deficiency you are going through. I would seek help from a nutritionist or homeopath or chiropractor. The United States is 4% of the world's population, we consume 70% of the world's perscription drugs yet are 40th healthiest country. Obviously the American "medical model" (cut, burn, drug) is a total failure.

Play drums. Get outdoors. Eat healthier. Fire your doctor :) Best of luck.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-04-2012, 07:26 PM
larryz's Avatar
larryz larryz is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,911
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryace View Post
My wife was mis diagnosed with bipolar, and for years she (and I) were miserable because of all the meds she had to take. I always knew those things were poisonous for her and encouraged her to not take them. Long story short, now she has not been on anything at all for close to 18 months and guess what? She wasn't bipolar in the first place. Now she is a normally functioning human being with normal episodes of ups and downs, not exaggerated episodes of ups and downs. There's a lot more to this story how she was able to get off the meds in the first place, but she's off them and now she has her life back.

I don't trust the medical profession. If you need to set a bone, or need an antibiotic OK. But beyond that, It's in their best interest to keep you sick. Don't get me started on this topic. She was on so many different drugs...They don't want to heal away a source of income....it's sickening, literally.

I can't speak intelligently about your situation, so I will with hold any comments other than to say I'm glad that you seem to be feeling better, and to encourage you to keep drumming in your life. It will help keep you on track.
Great Larrys think alike. I'm with you 100%.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-04-2012, 08:17 PM
larryace's Avatar
larryace larryace is offline
"Uncle Larry"
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In beautiful Bucks County, PA
Posts: 13,879
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryz View Post
Great Larrys think alike. I'm with you 100%.
Great Larrys, both from Pennsylvania, think even more alike lol.

Where in PA RU? I think I recognize the place in your avatar lol. Lehigh County, right?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-04-2012, 08:34 PM
Zero Mercury Drummer's Avatar
Zero Mercury Drummer Zero Mercury Drummer is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 212
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Drumming has therepeutic value. I started playing when I was 16- I was an extremely unfocused kid with classic ADD (before that term was invented). Drumming brought focus to my nervous energy, gave me an outlet and a hobby, and even helped me meet people and form social circles. It really did change my life completely.
__________________
Drummer for DC-based space rock band Zero Mercury
Personal page with a few solos: here
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-04-2012, 08:56 PM
THC's Avatar
THC THC is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Colorado, USA
Posts: 401
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryace View Post
My wife was mis diagnosed with bipolar, and for years she (and I) were miserable because of all the meds she had to take. I always knew those things were poisonous for her and encouraged her to not take them. Long story short, now she has not been on anything at all for close to 18 months and guess what? She wasn't bipolar in the first place. Now she is a normally functioning human being with normal episodes of ups and downs, not exaggerated episodes of ups and downs. There's a lot more to this story how she was able to get off the meds in the first place, but she's off them and now she has her life back.

I don't trust the medical profession. If you need to set a bone, or need an antibiotic OK. But beyond that, It's in their best interest to keep you sick. Don't get me started on this topic. She was on so many different drugs...They don't want to heal away a source of income....it's sickening, literally.

I can't speak intelligently about your situation, so I will with hold any comments other than to say I'm glad that you seem to be feeling better, and to encourage you to keep drumming in your life. It will help keep you on track.

Glad to see I'm not the only one who feels this way. My wife has been a slave to Big Pharma for years and is just now starting to see some light at the end of a very dark and lonely tunnel.

She's been misdiagnosed with everything from Fibromyalgia to Lupus to Mixed Connective Tissue Disorder, to about a dozen other made up catch-all disorders over the years. She's been on most every pain drug there is at one point. Some of the dosages were insane. It's been a nightmare. But she was convinced for the longest time that the next pill or the next Doctor was going to fix it all. And every Doctor was more than willing to keep ramping up dosages and switching around to whatever the drug of the month was. It made me sick to watch. I started going to her appointments and would confront the Doctors point blank on why they felt it was necessary for my wife to take 15 pills a day and be a friggin zombie. Every damn one of them could sit there and look me right in the eye and justify every pill.

All along I kept telling her that all the drugs were what was causing the symptoms she was experiencing, the migraines, the muscular and joint pain, etc, etc, etc, and that the doctors were putting her on more pills to fix the side effects of the other pills, and that is was a viscous circle that she was caught in. She didn't want to believe it. She kept slipping deeper and deeper into a drugged, depressed, stupor until she finally tried to commit suicide.a couple years ago. That's when she finally started to see the light.

After years of trying to talk some sense, I think I have finally gotten through. For the past few years I've been pushing and pushing her to start using medical marijuana and ween herself of the drugs. She finally gave it a chance, and after about a year she is completely off all the pain meds. I am starting to see the woman I married 15 years ago emerging from the drug induced coma she's been in for so long. She actually has a sense of humor again. She's a completely different person And guess what? All her "symptoms" from all these bogus diagnosis' are going away. hmmm???

I have huge issues with Big Pharma and the medical industry at large as well. I agree that there are amazing advances being made every day in medical science that are funded by these corporations, but it's the darker side of that industry that supports getting people hooked on pills for made up conditions that makes me sick.


resohead, I am also glad you are doing better and have found what works for you. Keep it up.
.
__________________
Mapex Meridian
"I hear and I forget, I see and I remember. I do and I understand."
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-04-2012, 09:28 PM
resohead's Avatar
resohead resohead is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 526
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Thanks. Didn't have any intention of opening a can of worms here but people have strong opinions on psychiatry, meds, misdiagnosis, etc. So do I.

Unfortunately, I'm certified bipolar I and I have the maniacally out of my mind emergency psych ward visits to back me up. If I didn't take Lithium and other mood stabilizers, I'd be dead. No doubt.

The reason that psychiatrists 'pill you to death' as my mother once said is because 1 out of 5 people with this illness kill themselves. It's a lethal disease.

It's not always totally manic / totally depressed, it has an awful lot to do with interest and energy levels. All the coping mechanisms mentioned here are good advice but I would never, ever, ever tell someone that was bipolar to stop their medication. Many do stop because their brain is addicted to mania. Some even live to tell the tale.

So, I back the meds up with therapy, exercise, bipolar support group meetings, mh forums and lots of reading. Nobody should just swallow pills and expect them to fix things all by themselves, but I've seen that happen, too.

Time to beat the drums!!!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-04-2012, 09:29 PM
larryace's Avatar
larryace larryace is offline
"Uncle Larry"
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In beautiful Bucks County, PA
Posts: 13,879
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by THC View Post
Glad to see I'm not the only one who feels this way. My wife has been a slave to Big Pharma for years and is just now starting to see some light at the end of a very dark and lonely tunnel.

She's been misdiagnosed with everything from Fibromyalgia to Lupus to Mixed Connective Tissue Disorder, to about a dozen other made up catch-all disorders over the years. She's been on most every pain drug there is at one point. Some of the dosages were insane. It's been a nightmare. But she was convinced for the longest time that the next pill or the next Doctor was going to fix it all. And every Doctor was more than willing to keep ramping up dosages and switching around to whatever the drug of the month was. It made me sick to watch. I started going to her appointments and would confront the Doctors point blank on why they felt it was necessary for my wife to take 15 pills a day and be a friggin zombie. Every damn one of them could sit there and look me right in the eye and justify every pill.

All along I kept telling her that all the drugs were what was causing the symptoms she was experiencing, the migraines, the muscular and joint pain, etc, etc, etc, and that the doctors were putting her on more pills to fix the side effects of the other pills, and that is was a viscous circle that she was caught in. She didn't want to believe it. She kept slipping deeper and deeper into a drugged, depressed, stupor until she finally tried to commit suicide.a couple years ago. That's when she finally started to see the light.

After years of trying to talk some sense, I think I have finally gotten through. For the past few years I've been pushing and pushing her to start using medical marijuana and ween herself of the drugs. She finally gave it a chance, and after about a year she is completely off all the pain meds. I am starting to see the woman I married 15 years ago emerging from the drug induced coma she's been in for so long. She actually has a sense of humor again. She's a completely different person And guess what? All her "symptoms" from all these bogus diagnosis' are going away. hmmm???

I have huge issues with Big Pharma and the medical industry at large as well. I agree that there are amazing advances being made every day in medical science that are funded by these corporations, but it's the darker side of that industry that supports getting people hooked on pills for made up conditions that makes me sick.


resohead, I am also glad you are doing better and have found what works for you. Keep it up.
.
Wow. Just Wow. Yea, I've been on suicide watch more times than I care to recall. We are kindred spirits THC. I share your disgust for that aspect of the medical profession. They are bad bad drug pushers, no less. Funny you mentioned the connective tissue disorder. My baby is presently diagnosed with that too. She is on zero drugs though, other than MM, which I don't even consider a drug. Drugs can kill you, MM will not. The change in her is literally night and day. I have a real, normal healthy wife now, not some drugged up, fragile shell of a woman. I could have wrote what you just said, I know EXACTLY what you are going through. Or went through, hopefully. Keep her off those Big Pharma poisons. They're toxic to humans.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-04-2012, 09:33 PM
larryz's Avatar
larryz larryz is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,911
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryace View Post
Great Larrys, both from Pennsylvania, think even more alike lol.

Where in PA RU? I think I recognize the place in your avatar lol. Lehigh County, right?
Hey, I'm in the land of Steelers though I prefer baseball and the loser Pirates. The photo is of the Kinzua Bridge near Allegheny National Forest. I guess a tornado partially destroyed in a few years ago and it still is untouched. A magnificent photo-op..
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-04-2012, 09:47 PM
zakhopper316's Avatar
zakhopper316 zakhopper316 is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: new york city
Posts: 540
Default Re: Drum and Bass drumming

If you don't recognize the fact that we live longer now then ever before, and completely due to modern medicine then your lying to yourself. Technology allows us to sit around all day, industry allows us to eat from our cars...medicine and the "poison pills" allows us to live an extra 25 years all while counter acting heart disease and diabetes....
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-04-2012, 09:55 PM
Midnite Zephyr's Avatar
Midnite Zephyr Midnite Zephyr is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Surf City, CA
Posts: 3,335
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

I think we've all been depressed now and then. If you haven't, then you're lucky. I think I was born with a chip on my shoulder and a beef against authority and society. Society has always been a big source of depression for me. If I think about it all and the way the world is, I can get really, really down. Growing up I saw the adults in my family as a perfect example of living the ways I would never choose to be. I've changed very little in that perspective. There's not a whole lot of people who really impress me. I guess I'm just not a people person and never have been, but I try to get along and leave a positive impression on people despite my ambivalence towards society in general. Knowing my own mom and all the pitfalls that Larry eluded to regarding his wife and the medical profession, I've never taken the meds myself. I think getting plenty of sunshine, healthy eating, proper vitamins, and exercise is the most important thing. But also, having a healthy outlet like playing drums and socializing with like minded musicians has been the one thing that keeps me going sometimes. Sometimes that's the only thing that keeps me going.

My understanding is that there are two types of depression, situational and clinical. Situational can be changed by changing the situation that causes the depression. Some people are psychic vampires who suck all the positive energy out of others. When I was around this type of person, it had a severe affect on me. So, despite all the guilt that this person laid on me, I had to separate myself from this situation. I believe that if you allow yourself to be in a situational depression for too long, it will alter your brain's chemistry and eventually develop into clinical depression. That's when the doc has you by the gonads.
__________________
5A Sticks--Coated Heads--Acoustic Drums--Cast Bronze Cymbals--Heavy-Duty Hardware
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-04-2012, 10:05 PM
GuiGeek GuiGeek is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 31
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Damn. Don't take it personally but it seems half of the population in the USA has ADD or bipolar disorder.
I mean, it seems the diagnostics are being given a bit too fast. And ALSO, meds for this kind of condition can be harmful and you have to be very serious about this but it looks like it's 'normal' to take this if the doctor says so. Kind of scary for an european.

Well back to the point. I know what you're talking about since I'm suffering from depression for something like 4 years now. I don't even remember. I've eaten a lot of sh**, sorry to say, but I don't know how I made it this far. Sometimes, mental pain is just unbearable.
All I can say is, whenever I have a good drumming session, everything feels right again. The energy you give to your drums seems to be brought back to you 10 times stronger. And the more you play, the better it gets.
It feels like when you play and get inspiration by connecting with your mind and your body so much that all the anxiety and the stupid questions and things that usually run through your mind are taken away. I also play piano and guitar but they never gave me such a feeling, at least not as strong.

I hope that wasn't a scary post ^^
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 01-04-2012, 10:42 PM
dmacc's Avatar
dmacc dmacc is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,404
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

I have a brother who has been dealing with sever depression, bi-polar and schiz. for the last 20 years (that we know of).

I've seen it all with him from hospitals to arrests - the good, bad and the ugly - to the brink of death (literally) and back.

Hang in there my friend and hopefully music helps keep you heading forward in a positive way.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 01-04-2012, 11:50 PM
Pollyanna's Avatar
Pollyanna Pollyanna is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Cyberspace, Sydney connection
Posts: 10,000
Default Re: Drum and Bass drumming

Quote:
Originally Posted by zakhopper316 View Post
...medicine and the "poison pills" allows us to live an extra 25 years all while counter acting heart disease and diabetes....
No doubt we're living longer but a lot of the time people are just existing longer - but it ain't living. Many, many people are turning back into babies - total focus on themselves and their body excretions, helplessness, unable to understand most of what goes on. Then they spent the last of their lives without dignity.

Too much focus on existence and not enough life. Same with society in general - how about the way legal liability is extending its tendrils into everything we do to make living harder.

As for the thread, I was diagnosed ADHD in early middle age. The meds weren't good for me. I did once have good luck with anti-depressants. After a life spent in regular depression Zoloft stabilised me and I got out of the hair-trigger mental habit I'd developed over decades of falling in a heap at the slightest problem.

Once I was good, I weaned off them. I had a couple of depressions since but I got over them quickly organically and I stopped using the drug.

I suspect my ADHD helped draw me towards drumming - I found it suitably maniacal :) So for years there were no lessons or books or any kind of studious approach - just going hell for leather. Since I was a social pariah it suited me to spend hours daily on the kit and, once it was late, the pads.

I've mellowed with age along with my work ethic ...
__________________
.
Polly's rhythms
.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 01-05-2012, 12:22 AM
Deathmetalconga's Avatar
Deathmetalconga Deathmetalconga is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Boise, Idaho
Posts: 7,231
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by resohead View Post
I hesitant to post this but I know a lot of artists struggle with this and many don't know it.

I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder years ago. I'm always on meds and in therapy. Even with advances in treatment the depression side of the disease can shut you down at any time. It's the reason I've had years go by without playing or caring.

Three months ago my doc added a med to my combo. A week later I was dusting off the practice pad and metronome. Two weeks later I did a major cleaning on my modest Yamaha kit and replaced all the heads.

Next came a stationary bike for cardio.

Somehow my life returned before I recognized what was happening.

I know mental illness, depression, anxiety, etc and I've seen what it can do. I just have to be grateful for this day and hope for more like it but I'll always be looking over my shoulder because I know how fast it all can be taken away.

Maybe some here can relate.
I can't relate directly as I haven't taken any prescribed medications other than antibiotics.

But it is good to hear the right combination of medication and motivation worked for you. There is so much to enjoy in life and I am happy for you.
__________________
Ironwood kit Tiki kit Openhanders Vids
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 01-05-2012, 12:27 AM
inneedofgrace's Avatar
inneedofgrace inneedofgrace is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: New Jersey - Exit 5
Posts: 1,560
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryace View Post
I don't trust the medical profession. If you need to set a bone, or need an antibiotic OK. But beyond that, It's in their best interest to keep you sick. Don't get me started on this topic. She was on so many different drugs...They don't want to heal away a source of income....it's sickening, literally.

I can't speak intelligently about your situation, so I will with hold any comments other than to say I'm glad that you seem to be feeling better, and to encourage you to keep drumming in your life. It will help keep you on track.
Same here. I know so many people that are on multiple medicines. Instead of trying to take patients off meds, the docs just leep adjusting them and adding more. In many cases I don't see any better quality of life for them. It seems anyone with any anomoly is instantly placed on meds. I have my ups and downs, and I get depressed from time to time, and I'm probably somewhat ADD. But I thank God every day that I am not on any regular medications. Nor is my wife or my kids. And I want to keep it that way as long as possible.

I'm not saying there aren't cases where meds are absolutely necessary. I've seen people with severe depression get their life back after taking meds. But I still think drugs are way over prescribed in this country. It's all about the money.
__________________
"Through many dangers, toils and snares..." - Amazing Grace, third verse
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 01-05-2012, 01:25 AM
ycpmusicman91 ycpmusicman91 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: York, PA
Posts: 43
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

I really can't think of one really talented artist that doesn't suffer from some form of mental illness or anxiety. I myself am OCD, ADHD, and suffer from Acute Paranoia Syndrome. If it weren't for medication I'd be a complete mess. But I think a lot about this. I compose a lot. It's my stress reliever. If you think back to the great composers of generations past. Not a single one of them was 'fully there.' Maybe it's our mental illnesses that give us our talents. . .
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 01-05-2012, 03:44 AM
toddy's Avatar
toddy toddy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: isle of wight/london
Posts: 1,633
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

my mum has bipolar, my dad was a schizo. i'm messed up but music is my anti-depressant. it calms me down.
(the fact i just posted on like 20 threads confirms my hyper state of mind).

Last edited by toddy; 01-05-2012 at 04:07 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 01-05-2012, 04:09 AM
bigiainw's Avatar
bigiainw bigiainw is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Scotland
Posts: 982
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

I'm sorry, but I have to disagree Midnight Zepher. We haven't all been depressed. We might have been a little low of mood or whatever, perhaps for a longish period, but proper clinical diagnosable depression is not that "depressed" feeling that we all get from time to time. I work in social work with people who are properly depressed amongst others and believe me, they simply aren't the same thing and in fact you seem to explain that point of view in the second part of your post.

In the UK, things are very different. Doctors don't make money by giving you meds. The way the system works is that they get to keep more money by not prescribing, so we may, in effect have the opposite problem, where under-prescribing is a bigger issue, and we have way too many people self medicating with street drugs and alcohol, which leads to even more issues. As Resohead says, the right meds can make a startling difference. I agree you have to make your own mind up, but generally the last people who should be deciding whether they should take their meds or not are people in poor mental health, as they may well lack the capacity to make that judgement for themselves in a lucid way and may not in that moment understand the consequences of their actions. I appreciate I have npo knowledge of specific situations described on the forum and I apologise to anyone if my experience and the opinions formed by it offend, but I see many more people who are vulnerable and at risk who aren't taking their prescribed meds as opposed to those who do. That said there will always be exceptions that seem to prove rules and misdiagnosis is an issue in mental health- it is at the end of the day sometimes little more than an educated best guess taking into account the prevailing symptoms and presentation at the time of the assessment, Unfortunately doctors are humans too (well, most of them) and there will always, unfortunately, be a degree of error in any relationship that involves humans judging and dealing with other humans, as we all have our blind spots and inherent prejudices and preferences.
__________________
www.theshineonline.co.uk
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 01-05-2012, 04:17 AM
toddy's Avatar
toddy toddy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: isle of wight/london
Posts: 1,633
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigiainw View Post
I'm sorry, but I have to disagree Midnight Zepher. We haven't all been depressed. We might have been a little low of mood or whatever, perhaps for a longish period, but proper clinical diagnosable depression is not that "depressed" feeling that we all get from time to time. I work in social work with people who are properly depressed amongst others and believe me, they simply aren't the same thing and in fact you seem to explain that point of view in the second part of your post.
i agree, i watched my mum (when i was 13) go from being a successful social worker & happy person to being sectioned for 3 months. she's "ok" now but she has violent mood swings. she really wasn't helped by her GP at all, in fact he basically did nothing for a year until she had to be taken in for her own good.
if anything i have the opposite problem (hypomania i guess). luckily i have good friends to keep me on the straight and narrow!

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/...tion-hypomania

Last edited by toddy; 01-05-2012 at 05:28 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 01-05-2012, 05:16 AM
B-squared's Avatar
B-squared B-squared is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Colorado, USA
Posts: 683
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

My brother has bi-polar disorder. It runs on my mother's side of the family and I am very familiar with the disease and very fortunate not to have it. I feel the need to respond to some previous postings.

If you are unsure of a diagnosis, get a second opinion, but I must emphasize: it is dangerous for a bi-polar person to quit their medication!

I am all for natural remedies, but this one is nothing to mess around with. There are safe, effective medications available and dosages can be matched to individual cases. But stopping bi-polar medications is simply not smart. Period!

Please listen to medical professionals first when dealing with this disease. There is hope.

God bless you and best of luck!
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 01-05-2012, 06:23 AM
Dr_Watso's Avatar
Dr_Watso Dr_Watso is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,363
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Thanks to this thread, I'm writing a song, calling it: "If you're ill; pop a pill."

Honestly though, I can only speak from my dealings here in the States, but I think we need to take a good hard look at everything we trust people to let into our bodies and minds. Prescribed drugs completely aside, I see ladies at work who guzzle diet coke all day long with nary a sip of water in sight, usually complaining about their headache. I see culture that facilitates and encourages everyone to eat mass-farmed animal flesh for literally every meal of every day. Toxic chemicals go into a startling amount of what we eat, produce, and otherwise consume. Nobody gives a single thought to how all these things might react in our bodies or environments until it's too late, and then we look for the easy fix.

We train our young from birth that they MUST do as we did, spend into the college system, work for a corporation, become a "manager"; ignore your artistic callings, for they are not productive. Imagination and relaxation is for children and lazy punks, stress and hard work is how we should spend our days. Depression is a natural thing, and oh yes, we can combine lots of chemicals until you feel better!

We don't think for ourselves anymore, we follow the mass. Those who exploit and play this system learn how taking advantage of those around you produces the biggest rewards in the eyes of society.

Now I'm starting to feel sick.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 01-05-2012, 06:34 AM
toddy's Avatar
toddy toddy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: isle of wight/london
Posts: 1,633
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Watso View Post
Thanks to this thread, I'm writing a song, calling it: "If you're ill; pop a pill."

Honestly though, I can only speak from my dealings here in the States, but I think we need to take a good hard look at everything we trust people to let into our bodies and minds. Prescribed drugs completely aside, I see ladies at work who guzzle diet coke all day long with nary a sip of water in sight, usually complaining about their headache. I see culture that facilitates and encourages everyone to eat mass-farmed animal flesh for literally every meal of every day. Toxic chemicals go into a startling amount of what we eat, produce, and otherwise consume. Nobody gives a single thought to how all these things might react in our bodies or environments until it's too late, and then we look for the easy fix.

We train our young from birth that they MUST do as we did, spend into the college system, work for a corporation, become a "manager"; ignore your artistic callings, for they are not productive. Imagination and relaxation is for children and lazy punks, stress and hard work is how we should spend our days. Depression is a natural thing, and oh yes, we can combine lots of chemicals until you feel better!

We don't think for ourselves anymore, we follow the mass. Those who exploit and play this system learn how taking advantage of those around you produces the biggest rewards in the eyes of society.

Now I'm starting to feel sick.
great post dude i totally dig it.
recently i stopped eating so much processed food, i mainly eat salads now with fish and plenty of vegetables and my energy levels have skyrocketed. i don't really drink coke, but i do have a pear cider from time to time. now that i've had my diet changed for a month or so my anxiety and depression have suddenly gotten more under control.

whether anything i was eating/drinking before would be causing anything is impossible to say without a proper clinical trial, but i sure as hell know that from now on i am keeping my food clean. i almost feel physically sick now seeing people wandering around with mcdonalds & a "diet" coke. goddamn i sound like a hippy.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 01-05-2012, 07:17 AM
Midnite Zephyr's Avatar
Midnite Zephyr Midnite Zephyr is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Surf City, CA
Posts: 3,335
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Watso View Post
Thanks to this thread, I'm writing a song, calling it: "If you're ill; pop a pill."

Honestly though, I can only speak from my dealings here in the States, but I think we need to take a good hard look at everything we trust people to let into our bodies and minds. Prescribed drugs completely aside, I see ladies at work who guzzle diet coke all day long with nary a sip of water in sight, usually complaining about their headache. I see culture that facilitates and encourages everyone to eat mass-farmed animal flesh for literally every meal of every day. Toxic chemicals go into a startling amount of what we eat, produce, and otherwise consume. Nobody gives a single thought to how all these things might react in our bodies or environments until it's too late, and then we look for the easy fix.

We train our young from birth that they MUST do as we did, spend into the college system, work for a corporation, become a "manager"; ignore your artistic callings, for they are not productive. Imagination and relaxation is for children and lazy punks, stress and hard work is how we should spend our days. Depression is a natural thing, and oh yes, we can combine lots of chemicals until you feel better!

We don't think for ourselves anymore, we follow the mass. Those who exploit and play this system learn how taking advantage of those around you produces the biggest rewards in the eyes of society.

Now I'm starting to feel sick.
I completely agree with you, Dr. Watso. Even sitting in traffic for hours upon hours causes mental illness.

My sister called me last year because she was thinking of getting on an anti-depressant. I told her she should try some homeopathic remedies first and gave her some advice like in my previous post. I also suggested trying SAM-e or St John's Wort before trying meds. I also explained situational depression to her so that she is aware of it and how it can lead to clinical depression.

But it's actually against the law for an American doctor to prescribe something that isn't approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a medication. The job of the American doctor is to treat the symptoms, not so much cure the illness. If you are suffering from scurvy, it is against the law for a doctor to tell you to just go home and eat some oranges. They can't tell you that all you need to do to get rid of that heartburn is to drink a couple tablespoons of Apple Cider Vinegar. They have to prescribe Prevacid or whatever designer drug they are pushing. Representatives from the drug companies buy them expensive meals, golf outings, etc. to get the doctors to push their stuff on our society. But anyway. the discussion goes on and on...

My mom uses those A-D meds too because she is also clinically depressed. So did my drummer uncle, her brother. I can certainly understand the shortcomings of our health care and Great Britain's. We over-prescribe, they under-prescribe. Money is the under-lying motivating factor in both cases. Some people do need to be on A-D meds and my mom is one of them. She can't live a proper life without them. So I do understand. Sorry for the long post.
__________________
5A Sticks--Coated Heads--Acoustic Drums--Cast Bronze Cymbals--Heavy-Duty Hardware
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 01-05-2012, 07:50 AM
Pollyanna's Avatar
Pollyanna Pollyanna is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Cyberspace, Sydney connection
Posts: 10,000
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Watso, your post gets a vote from me too. You've dissembled a whole bunch of our blind spots nicely - all these things that are never questioned yet at least as harmful as the things we demonise.

Thing is, this schism between what we're told is good and what we intuit to be good is what makes us nuts. We get fed massive amounts of bull from the cradle and it confuses us because some of the things that we're told are good we instinctively sense are bad and vice versa. So we desensitise and make up for our lost awareness with distractions (TV, the news cycle, junk food, intoxicants etc) ... it separates us from our broken sense of reality and makes us more comfortable.

But it doesn't much matter. Most of us live the standard 60 to 80 years before switching off the lights. What we did during that time - be it focused or blindly groping - is gone irregardless. If you've had lots of enjoyable moments (whether you're sane or nuts) then that's a logical way to spend the time IMO

... just the ramblings of a mad woman :)
__________________
.
Polly's rhythms
.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 01-05-2012, 09:28 AM
Dr_Watso's Avatar
Dr_Watso Dr_Watso is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 3,363
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollyanna View Post
Watso, your post gets a vote from me too. You've dissembled a whole bunch of our blind spots nicely - all these things that are never questioned yet at least as harmful as the things we demonise.
Thanks. To be sure, my intention was never to demonize the positive effect those drugs had on resohead's life. I'm genuinely happy for his work towards recovery, as I'm sure we all are. Alas, it doesn't seem my overall point was lost in my ramblings for once.

Quote:
Thing is, this schism between what we're told is good and what we intuit to be good is what makes us nuts. We get fed massive amounts of bull from the cradle and it confuses us because some of the things that we're told are good we instinctively sense are bad and vice versa. So we desensitise and make up for our lost awareness with distractions (TV, the news cycle, junk food, intoxicants etc) ... it separates us from our broken sense of reality and makes us more comfortable.
I really have no idea what you're getting at. Now, if you'll excuse me, I have some "reality" TV to catch up on. The thing I like most about my reality TV shows is that they so closely mirror my real reality.

Quote:
But it doesn't much matter. Most of us live the standard 60 to 80 years before switching off the lights. What we did during that time - be it focused or blindly groping - is gone irregardless. If you've had lots of enjoyable moments (whether you're sane or nuts) then that's a logical way to spend the time IMO
Those close to me have once or twice alerted me to the fact that I may be a bit of a cynic, the word jaded has been uttered, and it's even been suggested that I over-use sarcasm in an attempt to lighten my sour commentary. Boiling down life to our personal moments of enjoyableness is my natural inclination as well.

In this case, however, I'll disagree slightly, perhaps irrationally. Having a positive impact on the world and people around us is something I believe can live on after we turn off our respective lights. Mind you, I claim no evidence or correctness to this statement, but it helps me get by between those times when I get to lock in a sweet jam with my friends.

And round-about to the original post, It's no accident that drumming, and creativity in general is often referred to as an "outlet".
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 01-05-2012, 02:18 PM
Pollyanna's Avatar
Pollyanna Pollyanna is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Cyberspace, Sydney connection
Posts: 10,000
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Watso View Post
I really have no idea what you're getting at. Now, if you'll excuse me, I have some "reality" TV to catch up on. The thing I like most about my reality TV shows is that they so closely mirror my real reality.
Oh yeah, I can see Dr Watso being a mirror image of the beautiful, vacuous young things on reality TV ...

Just that I was thinking about the raising of kids and when they get told lies then they get screwed up because they don't know what's real. I think that happens to adults too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Watso View Post
Boiling down life to our personal moments of enjoyableness is my natural inclination as well.

In this case, however, I'll disagree slightly, perhaps irrationally. Having a positive impact on the world and people around us is something I believe can live on after we turn off our respective lights. Mind you, I claim no evidence or correctness to this statement, but it helps me get by between those times when I get to lock in a sweet jam with my friends.

And round-about to the original post, It's no accident that drumming, and creativity in general is often referred to as an "outlet".
Of course without work there's no such thing as a holiday. So if you're into, say, partying all the time then partying is your job ... then what do you do for a break? Maybe go to Africa and adopt a child who'd otherwise never have opportunities and name him Maddox or Pax? :)
__________________
.
Polly's rhythms
.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 01-05-2012, 02:42 PM
toddy's Avatar
toddy toddy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: isle of wight/london
Posts: 1,633
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Watso View Post
T.In this case, however, I'll disagree slightly, perhaps irrationally. Having a positive impact on the world and people around us is something I believe can live on after we turn off our respective lights. Mind you, I claim no evidence or correctness to this statement, but it helps me get by between those times when I get to lock in a sweet jam with my friends.
in 500 years people will still remember mandela, gandhi & MLK.
well they might... if google allows them.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 01-05-2012, 02:51 PM
ruthevans41 ruthevans41 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 6
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

This type of phase visits many people, some get devastated and some fight with it. You are a fighter man never give up.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 01-05-2012, 03:35 PM
resohead's Avatar
resohead resohead is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 526
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Life is imperfect and people are stupid, no doubt. Some people are idiots that do themselves no favors. And frankly, I notice by many responses here that ignorance and stupidity are still flourishing in peoples understanding of mental illness. We call it stigma.

We don't bring this on ourselves. We don't carry a moral weakness of character. We aren't ignorant automatons that love taking pills. In fact, on average, people with bipolar are more intelligent and more creative than you are.

Bipolar is a 100% biological illness that manifests itself psychologically. We don't get ill because we drink diet cokes or because America has gone to the dogs or whatever overreaching statement you can make. It's passed down from family just like someone inheriting their tiny penis.

Meds are imperfect but they are getting better and they are the tools that psychiatry has to work with. They are trying to rewire your brain which is the only organ that we have little understanding of. In other words, they don't fix broken bones. It's way more complex than that.

So, a man with bipolar wakes up one day, floridly psychotic in full blown mania. He gets dressed, books a flight to Paris online with his wife's credit card. Before he's finished, he's spent every dime he has. Kids college fund, retirement, 401K, savings, everything.
When he gets home, his wife has had it and moves out with the kids. He's lost his job because he didn't think going to Paris without telling anyone was a big deal. Besides Paris is awesome this time of year. He loses his house but before moving out, he hangs himself. Why? Because with bp, what goes up will come down. The higher you fly the further you fall. All because some well meaning family member told them to stop taking Lithium (a salt)because they weren't sick, they were(pick one)lazy, stupid, had too much time on their hands....make something up.

There are tens of thousands of stories like this. Not all of them of this magnitude but they are just as damaging. Remember, 20% of people with bp kill themselves. If that isn't a crises, I don't know what is. But still, much of the population does not understand this illness. Many try to talk loved ones out of taking meds. It's a free country so go ahead and while you're at it talk all of your diabetic friends out of taking their insulin.

I'm 58 but wasn't diagnosed till I was 28. I used to say exactly what some of you are saying about pills, etc. But a good 6 month depression changed all of that. Depression is not sadness, severe clinical depression is a gaping hole of numb nothingness. You can't eat, you can't shower, you cannot get out of bed and you can't summon the energy to kill yourself. You've never known that this hell existed.

Bipolar has done many good things for me. It increased my awareness of human suffering for one. It's blessed me with empathy for people that suffer even if I can't understand why. It's made me proud that I sought help, not just meds, I do therapy, try to eat right, exercise, drum, support group meetings for people with every mental illness. It's given me the ability to lighten up on myself when some days I can't get out of bed.

As much as I love drumming, I'd drop it in a second to be with a friend that was in crises. I wouldn't tell them they are bad or weak people, I would be there for them. Just like I was for my mother, who, btw, was bipolar.

If you have a friend or family member who has to take meds for mental illness and they're having a rough go, instead of telling them the evils pf psychopharmachology, ask them if they are taking their medication. Ask them when their next doctors appt is. Ask them if they need to see their doctor now. Pills can't make it all better, sometimes it takes people crawling out of their preconceived notions and biases and saying a few simple words...Help me understand, I'm here for you.

Peace
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 01-05-2012, 03:46 PM
toddy's Avatar
toddy toddy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: isle of wight/london
Posts: 1,633
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Quote:
Originally Posted by resohead View Post
I'm 58 but wasn't diagnosed till I was 28. I used to say exactly what some of you are saying about pills, etc. But a good 6 month depression changed all of that. Depression is not sadness, severe clinical depression is a gaping hole of numb nothingness. You can't eat, you can't shower, you cannot get out of bed and you can't summon the energy to kill yourself. You've never known that this hell existed.

Bipolar has done many good things for me. It increased my awareness of human suffering for one. It's blessed me with empathy for people that suffer even if I can't understand why. It's made me proud that I sought help, not just meds, I do therapy, try to eat right, exercise, drum, support group meetings for people with every mental illness. It's given me the ability to lighten up on myself when some days I can't get out of bed.

Peace
i agree with the numbness. it's not self harm, it's not hanging yourself. it's the world with a light turned off with you sat in the corner with only yourself for company. it's worse than hell i imagine, at least in hell there'd be lava & stuff.
i'm not on "those" meds atm, the psych told me i just needed to calm down when i got real hyper. luckily i have some melatonin for when i can't sleep.

i enjoy the creativity and drive it gives me. the ability to go up to any stranger in the street and strike up a conversation instantly. but the crash is awful, i haven't had one in a while but i'm dreading it. i don't even feel "down" but still i can sense it looming somewhere in the back of my mind waiting to pounce. luckily i have a good support structure nowadays so it's not so bad as when i was a teenager.

i hate that i come off as an arrogant bastard though, because that really isn't my intention. i really try to hold my tongue but sometimes i simply say what i think & am left to pick up the pieces afterwards. oh well, time waits for no man so may as well hop on board and see where it takes you.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 01-05-2012, 04:13 PM
resohead's Avatar
resohead resohead is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 526
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

If anyone is old enough to remember Dick Cavett they may know he has fought bp and depression for years. Watch his interviews with Zappa, Jimi, and Janis on youtube. No one else booked them, Cavett was the best.

Anyway, about being able to talk to anyone, I'm the same way. Even with this stuff I was in sales for years. I couldn't understand how I could sell and be depressed at the same time.

I saw an interview with Cavett and he said he did a lot of shows so depressed he was out of it.

When he would play the shows back he was sure it would be obvious he was ill. He was surprised to find he was fine.

I guess people who deal with this somehow manage to pull out of it for short periods of time.
But then you're exhausted and sleep for 4 days.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 01-05-2012, 10:12 PM
toddy's Avatar
toddy toddy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: isle of wight/london
Posts: 1,633
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

good call on dick cavett, i just realised i watched a marlon brando interview on youtube the other day, and didn't realise but that was the guy talking to him. he sure can get a lot out of people. he sort of reminds me of me in a way. well, they both do.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 01-06-2012, 12:59 AM
Pollyanna's Avatar
Pollyanna Pollyanna is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Cyberspace, Sydney connection
Posts: 10,000
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Reso, sure, mental illness is neither just nature not nurture in many cases.

In your case, seemingly, it was just nature. For some people their problems start with environmen or what happens interacts with some innate problemt. To dismiss the environmental contributions to mental illness is as narrow-minded as dismissing the genetic illnesses.

I still say Watso's post was a beauty.

I didn't personally interpret it as being The Sole Cause of Mental Illness. That would be pretty dumb of me, given that I was hyperactive from the get go, had major problems with work, relationships and socialising and then got diagnosed almost by accident in my early 40s.

While the below statement is true in society:

Quote:
ignorance and stupidity are still flourishing in peoples understanding of mental illness. We call it stigma
It's pretty tough in a forum - it gives the impression that almost everyone who posted here is ignorant. Bipolar diagnoses are less misunderstood and disparaged than ADHD, so you have that one-up on me.

The interesting thing is the relationship of mental illnesses and disorders on our drumming. For me, I am highly inconsistent. I'll be spot on one day and abysmal the next. I have recorded many, many rehearsals and the difference at times in my playing is night and day.
__________________
.
Polly's rhythms
.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 01-06-2012, 01:10 AM
Messerschmitt's Avatar
Messerschmitt Messerschmitt is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Satu Mare, Romania
Posts: 170
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

I may be a bit offtopic with the following, but i tought i`d rather post in here than open a new topic just for myself.

On 22 December I woke up not hearing that well with my right ear, and when i got up from the bed, I felt that my balance has slightly been affected. I went to my doctor, he sent me to an ENT specialist, wich has diagnosed me with noise-induced hearing loss. I spent 10 days in hospital taking infusions and resting my ears. Yes, that includes Christmas, and it seems Santa doesn`t visit sick hospitals, as i got nothing.
My New Year`s Eve was screwed up as well, as i couldn`t leave the house and had to use ear plugs at midnight so i couldn`t hear the fireworks, wich are a potential hazard.I also have to use them when i dry my hair, when i do the vacuuming and other activities that involve noise.
My audiometry shows perfect hearing except two frequencies, 500 and 1k Hz, where i got a moderate loss. The audiologist said i have what is called a sensorineuronal bilateral hearing loss, wich is of cochlear cause. In other words, it cannot be fixed, not even by my 3-month medication. So in the given circumstances there`s no way i`ll pass 50 without a hearing aid, and the doctors told me i have to give up the only two things I enjoy and i`m good at: drumming, and flying. Also, there are a lot of other restrictions: no parties, no concerts, nu diving, music as little as possible, etc.
Don`t get me wrong, health is more important than anything, but i`m only 17, i don`t want to live the rest of my life like an grumpy old man. I DO NOT want to give drumming and i really doubt my drums are louder than my band`s amplifiers, wich i suspect is the real cause. I`m really thinking if there`s some way of continuing with drumming, my morale was pretty low anyway, after all of this...and it felt like a hit in the face.

About a year ago i`ve fallen in a depression after a long-term relationship came to a halt, and it brings me goosebumps when i remember how much of a zombie and anti-social person I was. There have been periods when i wouldn`t sleep more than 4 hours cummulated in 10 days. It was exhausting, i was begging to fall asleep!. My therapist could not help me that much, nor could his medicines.
The thing that got me out of this are the drums, and the effort i`ve put to become the drummer i am today.I evolved from the basic "tu-ta-tu-ta" to complex polyrithms and odd-time signatures, and also a knowledge that allows me to play decently any genre i want. It was my only motivation, and somehow i dragged me from the misery I was in. Now that i have to give up drumming, what`s gonna support me further on? I really am hopeless now and i felt the needed to tell this to someone, so please forgive me if i spoiled the thread... If it is that bad, you can just delete the post.

Razvan
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 01-06-2012, 01:11 AM
Skulmoski's Avatar
Skulmoski Skulmoski is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Abu Dhabi
Posts: 1,313
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Take care and thanks for sharing. I hope you continue to enjoy drumming and keep us posted about your rhythmic progress.

Cheers and have a great 2012.

GJS
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 01-06-2012, 02:16 AM
Pollyanna's Avatar
Pollyanna Pollyanna is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Cyberspace, Sydney connection
Posts: 10,000
Default Re: Music, drumming and mental illness

Sorry to hear that, Messerschmitt. Very disappointing situation.

If music is out have you thought about taking art classes? It's creative and fun and allows you to express what you feel - and it's quiet.

Good luck!
__________________
.
Polly's rhythms
.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com