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  #81  
Old 02-17-2006, 01:40 AM
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lilblakdak lilblakdak is offline
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

Sairways response is right on. To get the stereo effect out of a mono setup is easy just mix the track down into two with one panned left and one panned right.
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  #82  
Old 02-17-2006, 01:54 AM
Dannar Dannar is offline
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilblakdak
Sairways response is right on. To get the stereo effect out of a mono setup is easy just mix the track down into two with one panned left and one panned right.
If you pan the same thing to left and right, it's still mono, that doesn't make it stereo.
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  #83  
Old 02-17-2006, 01:57 AM
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

I know. it gives the effect of stereo because one track is to the left and one is to the right. True stereo is a different beast altogether.
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  #84  
Old 02-17-2006, 01:59 AM
Dannar Dannar is offline
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilblakdak
I know. it gives the effect of stereo because one track is to the left and one is to the right. True stereo is a different beast altogether.
It actual makes no differnce. If it is in mono, it is the exact same thing coming out of both speakers, if you split that into to channels of the exact same thing, then pan on left and one right, it is still two channels of the exact same thing!
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  #85  
Old 02-17-2006, 02:06 AM
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

Once again, I know. Its an illusion of stereo. Its like David Copperfeild doesnt realy cut the girl in half he just tricks your brain into thinking he is. When its a complete mono channel the signal is split between two channels weakening it. When you double track and pan it, you have a stronger signal on both sides. Its not true stereo its just tricks your ears into thinking it is.
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  #86  
Old 02-17-2006, 02:20 AM
Dannar Dannar is offline
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

Having a stronger signal on through both speakers does not make it stereo, that would simply make it louder mono. Stereo involves separate/different sounds coming out of each speaker. For example if you point a stereo pair of microphones looking down at a drum set and pan them accordingly, then that is stereo. You can hear the high hat to your right, the ride to your left, the snare and kick fairly center, the toms going from left to right. Simply making something louder out of both channels in no way makes it stereo! I'll say it again, if you have the same thing coming out of both channels then it is mono, if you have one sounds coming out of one speaker and a different sound coming out of the other then that is stereo. There is no point in taking one track and copying it.

Oh, and David Copperfeild gives your brain a reason to be tricked by pretending to cut a girl in half. Copying a track doesn't even pretend to be stereo. That would be like Copperfeild taking a girl, standing her in plain view of the audience from head to toe, and saying "I just cut her in half". The crowd would not buy it for a second, because he has done nothing.

Another way to look at it is that Copperfiield takes a girl stands her in front of the crowd, then takes another girl that looks exactly like her, and standing them side by side and say, "I have now cut this girl in half and here are the two parts". (That one wasn't as good, but you get the point)
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  #87  
Old 02-17-2006, 02:35 AM
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilblakdak
Once again, I know. Its an illusion of stereo. Its like David Copperfeild doesnt realy cut the girl in half he just tricks your brain into thinking he is. When its a complete mono channel the signal is split between two channels weakening it. When you double track and pan it, you have a stronger signal on both sides. Its not true stereo its just tricks your ears into thinking it is.
Why not use the volume knob instead? xD Doubling the mono signal (doubling the sound energy) is only going to give you a 3dB increase in the sensed loudness. It will not create any sensation of movement on the left--right axis, which is what stereo is all about.

The human ear can locate a sound source based on the time gap that results when the sound of a point source travels to your two ears that are ca. 17 cm apart from each other. The phase of the signal is slightly different between the ears. If you play two same mono signals that are in same phase in two speakers it is just as mono as the same signal played mono all the way, two speakers being the standard mostly everywhere today.

There are "faux stereo" techniques that use ie. comb filtering to divide the signal to two channels, but a good mono recording sounds way better than any artificially created stereo effect.
David Copperfield is not really a sound engineer of any kind...
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  #88  
Old 02-17-2006, 02:44 AM
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

Quote:
Originally Posted by Simbe
Why not use the volume knob instead? xD Doubling the mono signal (doubling the sound energy) is only going to give you a 3dB increase in the sensed loudness. It will not create any sensation of movement on the left--right axis, which is what stereo is all about.

The human ear can locate a sound source based on the time gap that results when the sound of a point source travels to your two ears that are ca. 17 cm apart from each other. The phase of the signal is slightly different between the ears. If you play two same mono signals that are in same phase in two speakers it is just as mono as the same signal played mono all the way, two speakers being the standard mostly everywhere today.

There are "faux stereo" techniques that use ie. comb filtering to divide the signal to two channels, but a good mono recording sounds way better than any artificially created stereo effect.
David Copperfield is not really a sound engineer of any kind...

It's good to hear that I'm not the only one who knows what their talking about here!
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  #89  
Old 02-17-2006, 08:29 AM
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

I feel you brotha. I too record with two mics. I have a Blue Kickball a little ways in the bass drum pointing toward the shell, and a Behringer B1 condenser for an overhead. It sounds pretttttyy darn good too. I only wish I had another B1 for stereo. With flat EQ on the overhead mic, everything comes out pretty balanced. I turn the lows up on the Kickball to about 100Hz though.. I'm still experimenting with getting the 'right' kick sound I want ( i think i'll have to invest in a Danmar patch for that 'click'). Also, try some muffling techniques if you arent already doing that... some towels in the bass drum.. . stuff like that.

OH YEAH! One thing i do.. I cover the front of the bass drum with a blanket to isolate the kick from the other mic and vice versa. It may not sound like it does much.. but it's a noticeable difference. To me at least. I just started the recording thing about two months ago and I'm learning everyday! Only problem is.. my band just moved into a practice studio 30 miles away so I have no drums to play on anymore!

Time for a Gretsch Catalina Club, eh?

Edit: I paid $120 for the Blue Kickball at Guitar Center (it's the red ball mic) and the Behringer B1 goes for about $100 everywhere. After trying to get the right sound out of my kit for the first two months with 4 mics (two overhead, snare and kick) I discovered that I could use the B1 to mic the drums..... and this all happened LAST WEEK. Great sound. I love it. G'bye!
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  #90  
Old 02-17-2006, 01:09 PM
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

Here's what I would do.

Place the condenser mic at ear level just by your left ear making sure you don't hit it,that way you will pick up pretty much what you hear from the snare and toms, hihat will get caught by it well and frankly yudon't need to worry about that too much, just make sure you are happy with the snare sound.

Put the SM58 either about three feet infront of the kit low down at Bass drum height, try that out first, depending on how hard you hit the kick drum, you may need to put it somewhere else to get a good sound, possible on the batter side under the snare.

I would aviod putting it in the drum as that will really limit what you get out of it, it might produce a nice kick sound but you will get nothing else and with only two mics you need to get as much out of each as possible.
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  #91  
Old 02-17-2006, 02:30 PM
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

wow, thanks for the response guys, sounds like you really know alot! the reason i'm only using 2 mics is cause i got a really basic desk that can only do 2 tracks simultaneously (hey, it was 100 off a mate and im only 16). it is the fostex mr8 if your wondering.
im going to try all the different methods and if i find one i really like will post some sounds up! any other suggestions are welcome. thanks again ben
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  #92  
Old 02-17-2006, 10:19 PM
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

Ohhh, the good old days, I remember them...I had two micros, too and the position was: one as an overhead, one as a bass drum micro...

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  #93  
Old 02-17-2006, 11:20 PM
mjeffreys mjeffreys is offline
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

Dannar said... "My audio engineering teacher always says "mono sucks"..."

That is not true. Some of the best older recordings have drums in mono, panned a little to one side. Listen to Ray Charles records that were recorded 30-40 years ago. They BLOW AWAY the recordings going on in todays artificial world of the "products" of the recording industry. Remember... engineering is an art... and mono is a tool of an artist.

Maybe a mic in the bass drum and one overhead may sound nice. You could play with panning techniques to get a more intereting sound.
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  #94  
Old 02-18-2006, 12:05 AM
Dannar Dannar is offline
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

I should go into more detail over my "mono sucks" comment.

"Back in the day" all they had was mono. So since they could not record drums in stereo, they became good at getting a good drum sound out of mono recordings. When engineers became able to do stereo drum recordings, they did so. Hardly any stuck with mono, because if those engineers could get good mono sounds, they could get even better stereo sounds. If you compare the sounds of their mono work, to their stereo, in my opinion, the stereo work sounds much cooler. Plus, the drum sounds they were going after back then were nothing like the sounds every one is going after today. Back then most of the drum sets were jazz style drum sets, so they went for the jazz sound. As heard on many Ray Charles recordings. If your recording a traditional jazz album, you could use mono, but if your recording rock or funk, you don't want mono. You want a good stereo image. Plus no one today makes recordings that sound like the recordings of the 50's or 60's. If your goal is to recreate those recordings, then you could use mono, but it would still be hard to recreate that good of quality mono recordings. Even today most Jazz recordings have drums in stereo, and all rock or funk or anyother style use stereo too. It's a common practice for a reason, it works. If a artist today released a album where all the drums were mono, people would listen to it and go "what the hell is that!"
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  #95  
Old 02-18-2006, 06:24 PM
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

>>>>"If a artist today released a album where all the drums were mono, people would listen to it and go "what the hell is that!"


...it would be called "Rap" or "Hip-Hop". A lot of the loops and samples for that stuff is mono and, personally, I'd love to sell as many records as those guys do. No one who's buying those records seems to mind that fact that the main beats for a lot of that stuff is mono.

I think everyone has a valid point here. Is stereo better than mono? It's all relative. What's important is the feel and the song. The one thing I learned about engineering is that great engineering cannot improve a poor performance nor can it make a song better - period (and I'm not talking about Pro Tools engineering). Further, "bad" engineering won't necessarily ruin a good song or performance.

Ever hear the Van Halen story about how the engineer forgot to record one of Alex's kick drum mics for one of the songs on Van Halen 1? The only person who noticed it was Alex (I feel for you, bro, on that one), I doubt any of the millions of people that bought that record went "where's the other kick drum on this song?".

Bottom line, as long as whatever you're doing is right for the song and you're performing your best, just make sure the red light is on! If you don't record it, it won't matter if it's in mono or stereo...oh, and have fun! It's all good...
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  #96  
Old 02-18-2006, 07:58 PM
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dannar
Recording with only two mics will really make it tough to get a good sound. Especially two different type of mics.
I'll have to politely disagree strongly with this! The most important factors in the capture of a decent drum recording are the player, the room, and the kit...

The mics that the original poster has to play with are really not that inspiring, but with decent front end you could achieve excellent results!

re: techniques, a simple mono overhead and kick mic can result in a surprisingly punchy full-toned sound as long as your phase relationship between the mics is solid (tiny movements can have dramatic results, so spend some time adjusting positions) and the factors mentioned previously have been addressed! Listen carefully to what each mic is giving you and see how small changes in position affect both the soloed sound of the mic and the relationship with the other! With other mics to play with, say a C12 and either a fet 47 or R-122, I'd be delighted (and have been) to work with just two mics!

With three mics you can go for the classic Glyn Johns technique with one mic front of kick one three stick lengths above the snare and one low pointing across the floor tom three stick lengths from the centre of the snare too! If you can try this with a great kit in a great room with a great player and three U67s in great condition, you're gonna be VERY VERY happy!!! Pan the two kit mics L and R and leave the kick in the middle! Obviously thats an ideal setup so substitute away and see what happens!

The most important consideration with minimal mic techniques is to balance all the elements of the kit yourself while playing EXACTLY as you wish it to be represented on the recording!

Don't beat yerself up over mono/stereo either Dannar, theres a LOT of contemporary recordings with mono or fundamentally mono drum recordings!!!
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  #97  
Old 02-18-2006, 08:43 PM
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

This is really gonna bug some of the super production guys, but if you what down the street and asked 100 peole to describe how the drums sound on any given album, they'll say "like drums" 99% of the time. Meaning the listening audience could care less about the drum sound, they just care about the song as a whole.
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  #98  
Old 02-19-2006, 10:03 PM
tonys protege tonys protege is offline
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

hey, ive got some sounds im reasonably happy with but i'm getting so much bass drums through the overhead! i have a pacific cx kit so i have a 22X18 bass and then FAST size toms and a chad smith snare. it is a really loud bass drum and i was wondering if there were any tricks (blankets/mic positioning so not really tricks, more techniques) that i could use to reduce the amount of bass coming in the overhead.
thanks ben
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  #99  
Old 02-19-2006, 10:33 PM
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Default Re: recording with 2 mics

If you like all the other sounds from your overhead, just throw a thick blanket over your kick. Or put a pillow inside it to tone it down a bit.
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  #100  
Old 03-02-2006, 05:48 PM
Nick Garland Nick Garland is offline
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Default Microphones

Hi, I am looking into getting some recording equipment to mic up my drum kit. I am studying music technology at A level so I have some idea of what is required.

My kit is a single bass durm, 4 toms and a snare, with 6 cymbals including hats. What would be the best way to mic it up 2 on snare, 2 over heads and one on bass drum, or just one on snare 2 overheads and one bass?

Also should I buy seperate mics of a drum mic kit?

I know for the bass drum I need a special bass mic for low frequencies but for the rest of the kit would condenser mics be fine?

Lastly at college we use AKG C2000 mics which are 100 each, would these be good mics to use for overheads and on the snare drum?

Thanks

Nick
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  #101  
Old 03-02-2006, 07:03 PM
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Default Re: Microphones

Shure offers a quality drum mic set. I have the four piece set, but they offer a complete 6 piece set with 4 drum mics (1 bass drum - 3 snare/tom) and 2 condenser mics for cymbals, which should be more than enough for cymbals since being that a lot of cymbals wind up bleeding thru the vocal mics. I really need one more mic for my floor tom, but our board is pretty much maxed out anyways, so I'm making do for now. As far as quality, I think they are great.
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  #102  
Old 03-02-2006, 07:45 PM
Nick Garland Nick Garland is offline
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Default Re: Microphones

Could you get a recording from them please?
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  #103  
Old 03-02-2006, 08:36 PM
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Default Re: Microphones

I can probably have you something in a couple of weeks, we just purchased a Yamaha AW-2816 recorder. I'll send you a demo once we figure out how to use the thing. This sucker has one heck of a learning curve attached to it.
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  #104  
Old 03-05-2006, 01:22 AM
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Default Re: Microphones

I have the SHURE 4-piece kit as well. I like it lot for my 6 piece. I use 1 on the snare, 1 between my 2 floor toms, 1 between my rack toms, and of course that beautiful kick drum mike. It's awesome. Haven't recorded seriously with the mikes, but they are awesome live. If I had the cash, I get individual mikes for each tom.
For overheads, I have 2 SHURE SM-57s, but only use them in larger settings or when we play outside. Inside small bars, my cymbals are loud enough.

Oh, BTW, if you have something like a floating-tom system (a la Ludwig's Vibraband), the clips included in the SHURE pack are a pain.

Good luck.

J
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  #105  
Old 03-06-2006, 01:25 AM
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Default Re: Microphones

Here's what you could get if you decide to go with seperate mics instead of a kit:

Samson Q-kick bass mic

Nady cm-88 condensors (for overheads and hi-hat)

The venerable SM57 (or equivelent) for everything else.

These are all very inexpensive microphones, but they will serve their purpose well.

Are you needing a mixer as well? And if you already have a mixer, how many inputs can you use? I'm sure you already know that condesor mics require phantom power.

I have made recordings using only the Samson and two Nady's, and it sounded good, albeit very acoustic jazzy-sounding. For more punchy stuff you should close mic your kit.
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  #106  
Old 03-11-2006, 12:07 AM
Bonzo_88 Bonzo_88 is offline
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Default Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

I didnt really know where to post this thread so sorry if its in the wrong place. But basically ive got a live gig coming up in where in need to mic my drums and ive never doen it before. i was wondering if anyone with experience could help me with this.

My kit is a 10,12,14,16,20 yamaha stage custom advantage. i have zildjian zxt cymbals 14 hats, 16 crash, and 20 ride. zildjian a splash 10" and a 20" sabian paragon crash.

i really need this help soon cos the gig is on the 21st march.
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  #107  
Old 03-11-2006, 04:28 PM
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

Check this site, it may help you best. Micing is really all trial and error if you do not have any experience on your side. There are way too many nuances and techniques to get into to actually reply to your posting. Make sure your kit is well tuned or you will run into severe problems.

http://www.shure.com/selectionguides...rfrecmics.html
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  #108  
Old 03-11-2006, 04:58 PM
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

Yea, we need more detail to help with this.
How many mic's do you have and what kind are they? How many channels on the mixer are available for your drums? Then we can talk room size and shape, etc..
Some gig's I just mic the kick, snare, and one overhead, bigger gig's I have a mic for all the tom's, kick, snare, hi-hat, ride, 2 overheads, and sometimes we use another mic up high and about 3 feet in front of the kit for a ambiant addition to the mix.
Usually just micing the kick, snare, and an overhead works very well.
Hope this gives you some ideas on where to start anyway.
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  #109  
Old 03-11-2006, 08:22 PM
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

Yes more info please.

Here is the heirarchy of how I like to mic things (most important stuff first), all depending on available inputs for that gig and size of band, and all that stuff.

1 - Bass Drum mic. I've used just a bass drum mic more than any other microphone setup.

(adding mics)

2 - snare drum mic, positioned between hats and snare to pick up both

2b - one mic on snare and one mic near the hi hats (or as an overhead, see #3)

This is also a very common configuration for me with kick and snare/hats mic. Many times though, my gigs are small and the hat and snare needs little help.

3 - a single over head microphone is added to pickup toms and cymbals and ambiance of the kit. Note for small gigs (like jazz trios) this is sometimes the first setup (and only).

4 - two overheads

5 - big loud gigs, close mic on each tom tom. For my old gig that meant a lot of mics, a lot of cables and a lot of channels. Sometime it takes longer to set up mics than it does drums!
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  #110  
Old 03-11-2006, 09:10 PM
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

Stu is on top of his game here. Without knowing size of the venue, indoor, outdoor, your own P.A., who's running sound, keeping it as simple as you can is the best way to go if no one knows what they're doing.
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  #111  
Old 03-11-2006, 10:29 PM
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

I may have to disagree with Stu about the primacy of overheads on some gigs. I engineered on a gig for a friend last night for which we just used close mics - IMHO, most rock bands end up with way too much of the cymbals in the mix half the time anyway, so unless the room is fairly large overheads are often pretty inessential.

We ran last night with four microphones on the drums - one microphone each on the bass drum, snare and floor tom and one mic between the two mounted rack toms. The sound was actually pretty nice, all up. If the room had been larger then overheads might have been a good thing, but they have a nasty tendency to pick up all the foldback and other ambient stage noise and muddy things up.

In order to get a nice overhead sound you typically need condenser mics, and having two condensers sitting fairly wide open on stage when they're not 100% needed is not really best practice IMHO.
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  #112  
Old 03-11-2006, 10:33 PM
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

Quote:
Originally Posted by finnhiggins
I may have to disagree with Stu about the primacy of overheads on some gigs.
I have overhead usage pretty late in the primacy department. I'm not sure what the disagreement is?

I would suggest close micing on all toms as a last resort. Not for sound quality issues, just for logistical reasons. I find it much easier, and passable to run an "area" mic overhead for most gigs, before considering close micing.

Mind you, I love close mic'd drums the most. Just some gigs don't call for it (or most gigs, I would surmise).
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  #113  
Old 03-11-2006, 11:13 PM
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

I dont like overheads to hard to control feedback. I just use 1 kick, 1 snare, one between my rack toms 1 on my floortom. The hats and cymbals bleed through enough.
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  #114  
Old 03-11-2006, 11:16 PM
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

Ok, I see where the overhead complaints are coming from.

Maybe not the best choice for loud/rock music, but great for accoustic/jazz/lighter music.

Yes they do pick up too much cymbal for loud music. But for lighter accoustic music, I prefer a single overhead for overall ambiance over individual close mics.
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  #115  
Old 03-11-2006, 11:47 PM
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilblakdak
I dont like overheads to hard to control feedback. I just use 1 kick, 1 snare, one between my rack toms 1 on my floortom. The hats and cymbals bleed through enough.

IMHO this is ideal. At bigger venues I would mic the hats too.
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  #116  
Old 03-12-2006, 12:17 AM
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu_Strib
I have overhead usage pretty late in the primacy department. I'm not sure what the disagreement is?

I would suggest close micing on all toms as a last resort. Not for sound quality issues, just for logistical reasons. I find it much easier, and passable to run an "area" mic overhead for most gigs, before considering close micing.

Mind you, I love close mic'd drums the most. Just some gigs don't call for it (or most gigs, I would surmise).
My primacy argument was really with you having overheads before close-micing the toms. That's great in a jazz context where the stage volume is pretty low, but for most rock/pop gigs I'd go close-miked long before I put overheads in. Cymbals carry just fine acoustically for the most part anyway.

I'd tend to add mics in this order, for a 5pc:

1) Bass drum
2) Snare drum
3) Floor tom
4) Mounted toms (one mic between two)
5) Mounted toms (one mic per drum)
6) Single overhead
7) Stereo overheads
8) Hi-hat mic. Not that I use this much.

I don't actually like hi-hat mics at all. I worked with a very good engineer once who basically told me that he only puts a mic on the hi-hat because if he doesn't then the drummers always go "Why aren't you miking my hats, man?". Generally speaking hats have plenty of cut and show up just fine anyway. I've not seen many drummers where their hats seem acoustically quiet from out front of the kit - generally it's the opposite, to be honest.
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  #117  
Old 03-12-2006, 12:30 AM
Dannar Dannar is offline
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

With toms I have always seen it as all or nothing. It don't think it makes since to just mic one tom. That would sound mighty strange (dum dum DUM) I would either mic all toms, or mic no toms. The one mic for two side my side toms I think is a good way to go if mic's are limited.
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  #118  
Old 03-12-2006, 12:34 AM
finnhiggins's Avatar
finnhiggins finnhiggins is offline
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dannar
With toms I have always seen it as all or nothing. It don't think it makes since to just mic one tom. That would sound mighty strange (dum dum DUM) I would either mic all toms, or mic no toms. The one mic for two side my side toms I think is a good way to go if mic's are limited.
The only reason I would run a kick/snare/floortom rig would be just to help the low end carry from the floor tom out into the audience. You don't turn it up loud, you just give it a nice tight EQ so that you're just hearing the bass and mix it nice and low. Otherwise I tend to find you the the opposite to what you're describing through a mix: DUM Dum dum.
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  #119  
Old 03-12-2006, 09:35 AM
Stu_Strib
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

There are all kinds of ways to mic stuff up for all kinds of different gigs. I was just trying to supply a common sense approach to achieving a good sound with progressively more gear. I.E., what is the most important sequence if you were to add one piece at a time. As usual with everything drumming, it is a tradeoff, and you have to find what is acceptible to you. Unfortunately, the venue and sound guy for that event will probably have more say than yourself. I usually try to get as much stuff as I can, because I think drum sound is very important, but not every "engineer" sees it that way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by finnhiggins
My primacy argument was really with you having overheads before close-micing the toms. That's great in a jazz context where the stage volume is pretty low, b
Which is what I thought I said. Sorry if it weren't read that way.

My sequence was more of a logical, adding gear one piece at a time, as in if he added one mic at a time, what would he add. For me, close tom micing is always last (except for big loud gigs, like I said) because of the logistics.

A single overhead is fine (and maybe even better) for softer events.

As far as the Bass drum, snare drum and hi-hat mic in 2b, that is just to emphasis the importantness of those three elements of a kit. They are the three most used, so why not be the first to be micd, if you are on a mic budget, or not enough inputs?

I don't like "close" micing of hi-hats, but a nice condensor mic over in that area acts more like an over head for the hats and percussion elements (mostly the tamborine) I mount over there. I wouldn't use a mic hat on a simple 4 piece setup, rather a mic pointed at both the hat and the snare (losing seperation capabilities, but easier logistics).

If you are going to close mic toms, I really dislike putting one between two toms, because then you lose the ability to control the output level and mix it with the other mics.

As far as no overheads because the cymbals bleed through the other mics misses the point. First of all, high quality directional close tom mics pick up very little cymbal. Secondly, if you overhead the kit, you can adjust the overall ambiance of the kit, and have enough control and seperation for the cymbals that you can mix the cymbal volume in wiht the other instruments. This is why I don't like an "area" mic on toms, because you don't have the separation capability.
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  #120  
Old 03-12-2006, 10:06 PM
Bonzo_88 Bonzo_88 is offline
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Default Re: Micing up a drum kit for live performace.

hey. tahnks for all the info, the site, and stu were very helpfull. sadly im not sure what mics they are as the place where the gig is giving them to us for the gig. but thanks anyway. if i get more info ill post it. for now its a relatively small close cieling room. like a small pub.
cheers!
chris
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