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  #81  
Old 01-27-2006, 03:07 PM
Belgiandrummer Belgiandrummer is offline
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Default Re: Cutting a hole in the bass drum...How big, etc...

I found this on the net:

Holes in Your Head or Not


Here are the basic concepts:



· Any hole larger than 7” is like having no head at all on the drum.



· A 7” hole creates the feel of a one-headed kick drum, feeds more beater attack direct to an audience and provides some of the tone of the resonant head. Further, it’s easy to position a mic and change internal muffling devices, if used.



· A 4-1/2” or 5” hole, or even 2 such holes, offset, allows some relief for rebound control of the kick beater, contains more of the drums resonance so that the resonant head is more pronounced in the tuning of the drum. A 4-1/2” hole is difficult to get large mic’s positioned within (but can be done) and/or internal muffling altered.



· No hole, very resonant, creates more bounce or rebound from the kick beater. It can become difficult to get the “slap” of the beater and resonance of the drum both when miced with one microphone. The muffling remains inside. The resonant head is very predominant in the overall sound.



There are usually four reasons why drummers want a hole (or multiple holes) in the bass drum:



· It looks cool.

· They do not like the feel of the beater on the batter head surface, it bounces as a result of not enough air relief.

· They need to mic the drum from or capture the sound from the inside.

· They want more projection without using a mic (less bass impact, more beater attack presence).



For those who want it because it looks cool, there is an acoustic impact on the sound by placing a hole or holes in the resonant side. By acoustic impact I mean that the removal of head material does affect the bass portion of the note coming from the drum.



Allot of the “bass” portion of what you hear is based upon the surface area in the center of the drum. That surface area is a diaphragm working much like a speaker radiator might work, in that it will aid in moving air. Remember that pitch is dictated by the tension and the surface area in movement. So if you remove a large center portion, you lose a large portion of the bass reinforcement that gets emitted by the heads movement and tension usually has to increase to compensate for the removal of the center area. Adding holes does not increase bass content as might be the case on a tuned vented speaker cabinet would.



Thicker heads tend to stay in motion longer. With loose tension they will vibrate at a lesser rate, which all translates into lower pitch and a longer resonance. This assumes no internal muffling, or other devices to make the head stop its vibrating motion sooner.



Some want the different feel created by having air relief but still want maximum bass affect. As you remove more head area you trade off deep bass for a different feel. A solution is using smaller holes placed around the perimeter of the head. If you want the mic to capture sound from inside, you either have to resort to say the May mic system or revert to a larger hole to get the mic into the drum as you require. What you ultimately do will be based upon the balcance of all the factors that are important to you.



It is the area of the hole that counts. Where it is located matters little for the affect on sound (as long as it isn't on the batter side). If you want maximum tone out of the head, then the size of each hole needs to be in the 1-2” size, and they need be placed closer to the perimeter, but not placed so the edge of the hole is closer than about 1” to the break for the bearing edge. In other words, for the best tone, you need to keep as much of the center of the resonant head intact as possible. And again, it’s not the number, it’s the area displaced that can make a big difference and where that area is removed. You can make any number you want, in the following example to illustrate the concept we'll make two holes to represent the maximum area displaced by a common 7 inch hole.



The math is simple. We first need to calculate the area of a 7” hole. To do this we use the formula Pi(R˛). So first find half of the diameter of the 7" hole (the radius), which is 3.5”. Now multiply that times itself. So 3.5 x 3.5 = 12.25. Then take this result of 12.25 and multiply it times Pi, which is 3.142. So we now have 12.25 x 3.142 = 38.5. So the area of the 7 inch hole we started with is 38.5 square inches. This 38.5 sq. in. is important. We will simply round it up to 40 square inches, cause close is enough.



Now we can use any number of holes as long as is does not cumulatively exceed 40 square inches of total area. Yet at the same time does equal 40 square inches. This will be the same air relief as having one 7” hole and the end result will be more center surface are and a stronger bass affect.



Now take the 40 sq. in. and divide by 2, 3, or 4, what ever. Let’s say you want 3 holes. 40 ÷ 3 = 13.33. So 13.33 is the maximum area for each of the 3 holes. So we now take the 13.33 ÷ Pi (which is 3.142) = 4.24. Now extract the square root (from a math table or calculator) of 4.24 and you get 2.06. So 2 x 2.06 = 4.12. This means 3 holes of 4.12 diameter will give the same acoustic result as a single 7” hole.



Let’s say you have1 hole of a diameter of 4.5”, a common bass drum hole. Let’s compute the area displaced by that single 4.5” hole. (Math: 4.5 ÷ 2 = 2.25, THEN 2.25 x 2.25 = 5.0625, THEN 5.0625 x 3.142 = 15.9). A 4.5” hole has an area of 15.9 sq. in.



In the above example we show that if we were to use 2 holes of 4.5”, the cumulative affect will have less area (31.8 sq. in. total) than that of a single 7” hole, whichj we learned was about 40 sq. in. The 2 – 4.5” holes will therefore be a little more bass heavy than will a head with a 7” hole because they do not remove as much of the heads surface, although you probably will not hear it.



As the bass drum is equipped with a solid resonant head, it will always sound warmer or more bass heavy. The smaller holes are designed to allow relief yet still allow the resonant head to resonate. As you cut away more of the head there is less to resonate.



More large holes will make the drum a little louder and more present out front. Smaller holes around the perimeter gives better feel but the drum retains warmth.



So if you want more acoustic impact from the resonant head itself, create less “hole” area
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  #82  
Old 01-30-2006, 07:00 AM
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Default Re: Bass Drum Holes

Making a hole in a front bass head.
One thing my teacher suggested--and it worked great. is to-
1.take the head off
2.heat up a coffe can(or anything that is round, and made of metal)
3.when it is hot enough,press it down on the head to make a hole
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  #83  
Old 02-10-2006, 09:10 AM
pearldjian0711 pearldjian0711 is offline
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Default putting a hole in front bass reso...

i wanna put a hole on the front bass reso head. how big should the hole be? and how would i cut a perfect circle? oh and where is the best place to put the hole (more to the center or side?)
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  #84  
Old 02-10-2006, 09:27 AM
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Default Re: putting a hole in front bass reso...

Guitar center or most drum shops should have the HOLZ system. It's 2 plastic rings that snap together, real easy to install. Are you doing this for recording purposes or to vent the bass drum?
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  #85  
Old 02-13-2006, 03:47 AM
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Default Re: Cutting a hole in the bass drum...How big, etc...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leadfoot
If you're doing it for the purpose of miking the drum, make sure you put the hole high enough off the floor so the stubby boom stand can go in the hole. I cut one once too low, & couldn't get the boom in it. Oops!
The only obvious solution to this would be to hang the mic from the ceiling, and then drop 'er down in there... or you could just rotate the head.
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  #86  
Old 02-27-2006, 12:31 PM
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Default bass drum hole

for a 22 inch bass drum what hole size would be good?
i need a good balance between resonance and micing placement convenience.
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  #87  
Old 02-27-2006, 02:02 PM
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Default Re: THE DRUM MODIFICATION THREAD.

Hi, i'm assuming this is the right thread. What's the best way to port the bass reso head? Stanley knife + stencil? any suggestions appreciated.
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  #88  
Old 02-27-2006, 03:01 PM
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Default Re: bass drum hole

Get an aquarian regulator with a 4 inch hole already in it. Cutting holes on your own can be done but most of the time it ends with a ruined head. I have also seen black remo ambassadors with the 7 inch hole in the center. They were just plain black, no logo.
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  #89  
Old 02-27-2006, 04:05 PM
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Default Re: bass drum hole

A 4" hole at about 4 o'clock on your head should work fine. You can buy a hole cutter, or get a really sharp exacto-knife and a 4' tin can and take your time, you only get one shot at it.
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  #90  
Old 02-27-2006, 09:46 PM
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Default Re: bass drum hole

I use the HOLZ system. 2 plastic rings, with adhesive already on them. Comes with easy to read instructions. Makes for a pro-looking front head. I've used the system 5 times myself and not messed up a reso. head once.
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  #91  
Old 02-27-2006, 11:25 PM
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Default Re: bass drum hole

google the "Drum tuner's bible". Great teachings on everything...including but not limited to ....why cut a hole, size of hole to cut, where to cut the hole etc. etc...
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  #92  
Old 02-27-2006, 11:30 PM
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Default Re: bass drum hole

Quote:
Originally Posted by harryconway
I use the HOLZ system. 2 plastic rings, with adhesive already on them. Comes with easy to read instructions. Makes for a pro-looking front head. I've used the system 5 times myself and not messed up a reso. head once.
I agree HOLZ works well. BEWARE of the imitation HOLZ kit that Guitar Center sells. The rings do not stay snapped together. I have installed numerous HOLZ kits without a problem. It works well and east with an Exacto knife with a sharp brrand new blade installed...

Matt
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  #93  
Old 02-28-2006, 02:18 AM
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Default Re: bass drum hole

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilblakdak
A 4" hole at about 4 o'clock on your head should work fine. You can buy a hole cutter, or get a really sharp exacto-knife and a 4' tin can and take your time, you only get one shot at it.
4" hole at 4 oclock is about standard with todays drummers.... the best thing is to get an Aquarian Port Hole... you just plopp it on and cut the hole with a sharp utility knife... I do this on 90% of the drum sets I sell... its easy and you dont have to worry about the hole ripping...
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  #94  
Old 02-28-2006, 02:54 AM
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Default Re: bass drum hole

I'll tell you a secret that will take all the worry out of cutting that hole. Take an empty coffee can with the diameter you're looking for. Next, go turn on the stove and set the can upside down where the open end is touching the burner. As soon as you get it heated up nice and hot, take some oven mitts and grab the can, place it over the bass drum head and watch it melt a perfect circle. Be sure to get it centered up where you want it before you lower the boom. It goes very quick. It makes a nice clean cut. Good luck.
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  #95  
Old 02-28-2006, 04:46 AM
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Default Re: bass drum hole

isn't that one of alex van halen's tricks? Thought i heard that he did that or something...
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  #96  
Old 04-18-2006, 12:07 AM
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Default porting the bass drum

Hi, im planning on making a port in my in my bass drum, ive read prof sounds toughts on it and i think it will help me get closer to the sound i want, but i cant find a topic that says how to cut it, the only thing i found on here was to heat up a something circular made of metal and to push on the head, does thi really work ?
Does anybody have tips on how to cut it ?

Last edited by Tuxido; 04-18-2006 at 12:33 AM.
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  #97  
Old 04-18-2006, 12:30 AM
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Default Re: porting the bass drum

I've always used heads with pre-cut holes but I believe that some drumhead or accessory companies make a tool for porting the head. It includes a ring that keeps the hole from tearing at the edges.
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  #98  
Old 04-18-2006, 12:40 AM
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Default Re: porting the bass drum

Hello Tuxido,
I have some knowledge on the subject since I have done my own porting. The best and most important thing is not to heat anything and apply to the drum heads. This will only serve to ruin a drumhead and make a mess of things. I suggest that you get a circular compass and painter's masking tape first.
Follow these steps:
1)Tape up the head area that will be cut by applying the tape to the head.
2) Use the compass to trace out the diameter cut size: (4" is the best all round port size in the 4 O'clock position) you won't loose to much front head resonance.
3) With the head on the drum and tensioned, cut out the traced outline with a single edge razor blade ( make the cut in a vertical motion going around the head. Take you time with this as to not to create jaggered edges.(short passes are better)
4)After cutting out the head portion not needed, sand the inner cut portion of head with 320 grit sand paper to smooth out any imperfections. Be careful not to sand the face of the head. ( Appy tape to the surface to protect this face) Good Luck!!!!!!
Let me know how it turns out tuxido...... wagaad@msn.com
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  #99  
Old 04-18-2006, 12:44 AM
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Default Re: porting the bass drum

A product called HOLZ consists of two plastic rings that have adhesive on them. You place one on the drum head, cut inside the ring (with a razor or real sharp knife), snap second ring onto other side of drum head. Done.
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  #100  
Old 04-18-2006, 12:56 AM
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Default Re: porting the bass drum

Wow, thx Gdrumz, thats exactly what i needed, ill post pictures when im done ( probly in a couple of days)
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  #101  
Old 04-18-2006, 01:52 AM
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Default Re: porting the bass drum

Done ! Thanks!
My hearth was beating really fast at the beginning, so my tip is, to calm down and to apply controlled force when cutting to avoid slipping.
And got an idea, your description + my pic = how to port a bass drum tread ?

heres the pics;






^^messed up there (slipped) but fixed it with the sandpaper, :)

Last edited by Tuxido; 04-18-2006 at 02:06 AM.
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  #102  
Old 04-18-2006, 02:12 AM
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Default Re: porting the bass drum

Good job. Now I suggest you purchase a reinforcement ring (as mentioned above such as a 'Holz' to prevent a tear from developing. At the very least apply some clear tape around the circumference of the hole to help reinforce slightly (as emphasised above) good job, I'd be scared to ruin my Resonant head as you don't see too many Tamburos around.
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  #103  
Old 04-18-2006, 02:17 AM
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Default Re: porting the bass drum

yeah, ill do that when i buy my hats *knock on wood* saturday.
i really was shaking when i was cutting, haha..
but it turned out good.:)
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  #104  
Old 04-27-2006, 02:26 AM
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Default Holes in Kick Head

Just wondering what the general consensus was regarding the 'new trend' using 2 holes in the resonant kick head. I have always used one 5 or 6'' hole,right of center. As of late I have noticed alot of drummers using 2 holes and wondered what the effect on the sound is. Some,even though they have two holes,are only using one mic when playing live. I play rock on a 22x18 Mapex Pro M also. Thanks for the responses......
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  #105  
Old 04-27-2006, 03:17 AM
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Default Re: Holes in Kick Head

Maybe they like how thier bass drum sounds without a reso head...but they don't like how that looks? But just one hole in the center would have that effect...

The only other thing that I can think of is two bass mics, both inside the drum, which doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. Two mics are great but to put them both in the same area is pointless...Plus you said that guy wasn't using two mics...Hmmm....

anyone know for sure? I was gonna say so you can put the mic stand on either side, but that isn't an issue unless you are using a very small stand...
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  #106  
Old 04-27-2006, 09:50 AM
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Default Re: Holes in Kick Head

Mostly I think it's just the latest fashion craze. I've even seen reso. heads with 3 ports in them. 2 or more ports basically negates the reso. head altogether.
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  #107  
Old 04-27-2006, 10:35 AM
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Default Re: Holes in Kick Head

The stock head that came new on my '87 Premier kick had two holes - about a 5" near center and and a smaller one closer to the hoop. This was common on 80's Premiers for a while. I never figured out what the point was sound wise- figured it must be for looks instead of some special sonic advantage. Replaced it fairly soon with a Remo reso (stock heads often leave a lot to be desired). Later it came to mind that the maybe the large port was for placement of a large mic (D-112) inside and close to the batter, while the small one could accept a dynamic mic (SM57) placed slightly inside the reso to pickup the sound of the front of the drum as reinforcement.
Who knows? Head was long gone when I thought of this.
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Last edited by Loge; 04-27-2006 at 10:51 AM.
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  #108  
Old 05-04-2006, 08:18 AM
BigSexyPanda BigSexyPanda is offline
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Default Cutting hole in resonant head of bass drum

is it smart? is it stupid? is it worth it? does it actually help to open up the sound and make it sound better? or is it better to just get a new resonant head with a hole in it? and one more question, do bands usually cut holes, or do they usually just get heads with holes in em? had argument with friend want to know which sides right. thanks ahead of time.
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  #109  
Old 05-04-2006, 08:42 AM
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Default Re: Cutting hole in resonant head of bass drum

wow so many questions haha..
Alright, first off, it's a totally personal option. Some like it, some don't. The holes are mainly used to lessen the boom i find and it helps record because you can place the mic right inside. If you want to cut a hole, a good width is between 6-10" but don't go beyond that. I prefer the bass with no hole and just a little blanket in it to give a real nice boooooom sound. Don't choke the bass drum too much with blankets and pillows. Also once you cut the hole, either go out and buy a ring to place on the cut part to stop further tearing, or place tape around it.
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  #110  
Old 05-04-2006, 10:00 AM
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Default Re: Cutting hole in resonant head of bass drum

There is a drum head hole system called HOLZ that works great. I've used it on all the reso. heads I have that have ports.
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  #111  
Old 05-04-2006, 01:58 PM
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Default Re: Cutting hole in resonant head of bass drum

instead of doing it yourself i would suggest getting a aquarian regulator with a hole. awesome head and it muffles a little so if you have a superkickII or Emad you're set.
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  #112  
Old 05-04-2006, 09:28 PM
BigSexyPanda BigSexyPanda is offline
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Default Re: Cutting hole in resonant head of bass drum

are those resonant heads expensive?

and well the bass drum i have, i dont know if its just the beater or maybe i havent taken enough time trying to tune it, but it just doesnt sound like a bass drum. haha it has this nasty smack noise to it sometimes, and ive gotten it to where it sorta has the boom to it, but now my only problem is amplification, which is why i wanted to try to cut a hole to mic it.
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  #113  
Old 05-04-2006, 09:34 PM
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Default Re: Cutting hole in resonant head of bass drum

Don't cut the hole, melt it. Use a small coffee can and heat it up on an electric burner and drop it on the head. It cuts almost instantly so be sure you have good control of the can.
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  #114  
Old 05-04-2006, 10:26 PM
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Default Re: Cutting hole in resonant head of bass drum

Cutting a hole in the front bass drum serves two purposes. One, it is used for miking purposes to get a microphone inide the bass drum for a more isolated sound, and two, to reduce the resonance of the drum. The bigger the hole in the drum, the less resonant the drum becomes. Most companies that supply drumheads with a hole already cut in it have holes in the center of the drum about 10" in diameter, or a smaller hole offset about 6" in diameter. I personally prefer an even smaller hole, about 4" in the 4 o'clock position on the head to retain a good amount of boom but still being able to insert a microphone. If you aren't miking, I would not cut a hole out and tune the drum to get a big powerful sound. If you are miking, get an old head and experiment with hole sizes to find the amount of resonance you like before you actually make a hole. A great way to cut a hole is to find a metal circular object that is the size hole you want (I use a small coffee can). Heat it on a burner on your stove 'til it gets pretty hot, place it quickly on the drum head where you want it and press firmly. It will melt right through the head and give you a perfect hole every time. You may want to try it on an old head first. Good luck!
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  #115  
Old 05-12-2006, 05:08 AM
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Default Re: Cutting a hole in the bass drum...How big, etc...

you want a 6-8inch hole you can put it anywhere. i suggest taking electrical tape and reinforcing it on the inside.but make sure you only put 1 layer so you dont change the sound to much.
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  #116  
Old 05-13-2006, 09:34 PM
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Default Re: Cutting a hole in the bass drum...How big, etc...

The heated coffee can trick worked for me just fine. Just be careful what you have UNDER the head. I marked up my mom's cutting board so now (after 10 years or so now) it still has that semi-circle mark on it.
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  #117  
Old 05-24-2006, 12:37 PM
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Default Re: Cutting a hole in the bass drum...How big, etc...

I can't agree with you on your reply jollymosher. Putting a 6 to 8 inch hole in the bass drum will significantly reduce the amount of resonance from the bass drum, especially an 8 inch hole. Too much if you want to retain some boom. Putting that hole in the middle of the head will reduce the resonance even more, since most of the force from the impact of the beater on the batter head will be directed toward the center of the front head, so it does matter where the hole is placed. Also, reinforcing the hole from the inside is a good idea, but I wouldn't use electrical tape. It looks like crap if a light shines through the back of the kick drum and casts a shadow on the head. I cut a "donut" out of an old front head the same size as the hole and used contact cement to glue it onto the head around the hole. It reinforces the hole really well, looks neat and professional if lights from behind cast a shadow on the front kick head, and it doesn't change the sound at all.
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  #118  
Old 05-24-2006, 01:07 PM
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Default Re: Cutting a hole in the bass drum...How big, etc...

A good useful thing in my opinion are the 6 very little holes in DW-front BassDrum Heads. They do the job perfectly....

That's also the reason they are in black colors, so you don't see them.

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  #119  
Old 05-24-2006, 01:50 PM
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Default Re: Cutting a hole in the bass drum...How big, etc...

The DW head looks great and probably works well, but what about miking purposes? That's the only drawback I see to that head for live playing and having to deal with different sound companies and sound techs who prefer to place a microphone in the drum.
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Old 05-24-2006, 02:30 PM
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Bernhard Bernhard is offline
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Default Re: Cutting a hole in the bass drum...How big, etc...

Quote:
Originally Posted by cdrums21
The DW head looks great and probably works well, but what about miking purposes? That's the only drawback I see to that head for live playing and having to deal with different sound companies and sound techs who prefer to place a microphone in the drum.


DW is prepared of course for inside miking.....also all toms

Bernhard
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