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  #1  
Old 01-10-2010, 12:08 AM
Bradastronaut Bradastronaut is offline
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Default Electric kits

Hey guys i was wondering what the best electric kits below 600 pound would be?
ive been looking at the alesis dm5 but i have seen mixed reviews :S
thanks, and sorry for all the questions im just totally desperate for practice on something other than a pad D:
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Old 01-10-2010, 12:20 AM
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Default Re: Electric kits

I will watch this space with interest. My issue as well. Another important factor for me is space; I don't want a whole rack of stuff.

I keep trying out the Roland V-Drums Lite in shops but it never grows on me. Trouble is, the module only has a limited range of kit sounds (10) with only two normal acoustic kit settings, and neither are quite what I want.
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Old 01-10-2010, 12:31 AM
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Default Re: Electric kits

I got a TD3 with mesh head snare a few years ago for about 700 USD. Should be able to get a used one reasonably cheap now. Been thinking on selling mine but the benifits of having it are too good. Played a house party with it last week. Never thought I would use the rubber kit on the road but it worked well!
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Old 01-10-2010, 12:51 AM
Bradastronaut Bradastronaut is offline
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Default Re: Electric kits

Glad to see someone in the same position as me...i guess, means we should get double the help :P
Yeah the roland v lite is nice, just the pedal, i cant use that at all, and the toms are so small its annoying.
I cant find the td3 used anywhere locally, but it does look awesome. Do people not get any other brand of kit? or is roland the way to go, cause noone has recommended me anything yamaha or alesis so far :S
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Old 01-10-2010, 01:13 AM
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Default Re: Electric kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradastronaut View Post
Glad to see someone in the same position as me...i guess, means we should get double the help :P
Yeah the roland v lite is nice, just the pedal, i cant use that at all, and the toms are so small its annoying.
I cant find the td3 used anywhere locally, but it does look awesome. Do people not get any other brand of kit? or is roland the way to go, cause noone has recommended me anything yamaha or alesis so far :S
Well I can tell you the TD3 is not Awesome but it does work. There are limited sounds compared to the higher roland stuff but way more then 10.
I know nothing of the other brands low end kits..sorry.
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Old 01-10-2010, 01:53 AM
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Default Re: Electric kits

My nephew (he's 13) just bought a Yamaha DTXplorer kit off Craigs list for $500. That was pads, module, rack, amp, pedals, wires, throne, everything.
I just put an e-kit together. Off eBay, I landed a Yamaha rack, and 5 pads, for $174. A buddy had given me a Roland TD-7 module. Shop around, you can find modules in the $250-$300 range. Easily, you can get into a kit for $500-$600.
Personally, I'd stick with Roland or Yamaha. They are the 2 leaders in e-kits. Roland is the largest drum manufacturer in the world. And they don't even make acoustic drums. Yamaha, since they do make acoustic drums, samples their drum sounds from their acoustic kits. I think the Yamaha's sound a little truer, in nature.
Pictures of the pads and rack mixed in with crap I already own.
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Old 01-10-2010, 06:29 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

I've just bought a Roland TD6 with the mesh snare off Ebay for 350 ($560 at todays rate). Although it's a few years old it's in great condition, even has the wrapping around the rack legs. It came with a throne, gibralter bass pedal and Sony headphones.

I've now had it just over a week and my practice times have doubled. It's much easier to practice with my headphones on especially with a busy household. Just load up my ipod with my bands tracks and off I go. I've also found it useful with instructional DVD's. I route the sound through the TD6 brain so I can play along to them.

I'm very pleased with it but it isn't an acoustic kit. The hi-hat isn't anywhere near as articulate as mine normally is and the double zone cymbals and pads take a bit of getting used to.

Best to look at Craigs ist and Ebay for one. You just have to be patient and now is a good time of year.
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Old 01-11-2010, 09:59 AM
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Default Re: Electric kits

A used TD6 with mesh heads would be a perfect solution. I agree Roland and Yamaha are the way to go. Try them both. They use different technology. You can buy Roland drum software off the internet, for a range or real sounding kits.

Davo
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Old 01-11-2010, 11:15 AM
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Default Re: Electric kits

...OK slightly off topic...

...but I have a friend who plays drums and he thinks that electronic drum kits are cheating, I tried to explain to him that it isn't cheating without turning this discussion into a difficult argument...

...can anyone please give a few arguments as to why e-drums are not cheating...

BTW...his argument is that e-drums allow drummers to tune the mesh head tightly and therefore have faster rebound without compromising for sound.
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Old 01-11-2010, 11:24 AM
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Default Re: Electric kits

Are keyboardists cheating when they play organ or synth instead of acoustic piano? They're different instruments.

Some may make a fair argument that electronic instruments don't have the depth and sensitivity of acoustic ones but it's nice to have different sounds at your disposal. It's also nice not to annoy your neighbours too much.
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Old 01-11-2010, 11:34 AM
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Default Re: Electric kits

Quote:
Are pianists cheating when they play organ? They're different instruments.
Yeah, I was asking myself if pianists cheat by playing a digital synthesizer, you know with the gate arpeggiators, "virtual voices", pads and auto-loop and whatnot.

...but electronic drumkits, that is emulating a drum kit...!...I tried to tell him that it can be used to produce sounds not possible on an acoustic and that it can be used to complement an acoustic kit (like Danny Carey or Niel Peart does)...

...he hasn't changed, I should tell him that some drummers don't have as much space in their place as he does for his Sonor kit with the deep power toms...

...and that some drummers have other people that live in vertically adjacent housing.
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Old 01-11-2010, 11:54 AM
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Default Re: Electric kits

i own an alesis DM5 (without the sweet new surge cymbals or whatever they are... jsut the ole rubber ones) and it has been wonderful for me. ive been using it for practice in college cause i cant bring my real kit and whatnot. i mean its definitely not as good as a roland sound-wise or feel-wise (it took some getting used to playing it) but i am pretty happy with it myself. i have only twice had a problem with it and ive had it about a year. the problem was while playing it just stopped making sound. it would still recognize i was hitting the pads but nothing came out. turned it off. turned it back on and everything went just fine. haven't had that happen in many months now. if you just need something for practice, the alesis DM5 is great for the price.
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Old 01-11-2010, 12:10 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

Just checked online at a local store. It seems That the Alesis DM5 costs less than the Roland V0Drums Lite - and has 530 more sounds. No contest.

The reviews of the Alesis sometimes complain about glitches and not being able to stand up to heavy punishment, although others give it glowing reports (I'm not a heavy hitter anyway). The only advantage of the V-Drums Lite as far as I can tell is they are simpler and more compact.
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Old 01-11-2010, 12:12 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by BassDriver View Post
...OK slightly off topic...

BTW...his argument is that e-drums allow drummers to tune the mesh head tightly and therefore have faster rebound without compromising for sound.
Well he's right on that point. Every tom can feel like a super snare. All it takes is money!
Mesh head pads are pricey. I will say I find it easier to play the Rolands then my big old school Pearls. But so what really. I have them for practice and exercise. Don't get the cheating thing so much. Cheating who? Who looses?
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  #15  
Old 01-11-2010, 12:28 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

Personally I went from TD9 (costs about 2000 euros) to TDW-20 module (module alone costs more than TD9 kit) with TD-9 pads plus additional pads and pedals. But I still wasn't satisfied. Machinegunning (check out Langs DVD for great examples =P) and crappy sounds. The expansion board helped a little, especially snare and hi-hat are almost good already. But I still wasn't satisfied about the sound. Then I started to run midi through a firewire external sound card and run then through Superior Drummer 2.0 and Metal Foundry on my iBook pro. Now I have a decent sound I can almost gig with. Latency can be an issue with certain things and still it lacks a bit of the character of an acoustic kit. Lower end dynamics are sort of capped at a certain treshold because cross talk (hitting a pad trigger some other pad also because they are so sensitive) start to happen. So I'm forced to stay away from those so it's quite hard to play really anything quiet and delicate stuff on an low volume intro for example.

But this is what I have to play with for now. I'm forced to live in an apartment where I have neighbours down stairs, upstairs, left and right. And the space is also very small. I have to take my kit every week to practice, tear it down and set it up couple of times a week. So no acoustic kit for me, yet. =(

But time will tell if I ever actually buy one. You can do things with e-kits you could never do with acoustics and vice versa. But e-kits are coming closer and closer. When certain technicalities are solved I think in most cases e-kit will do even better. You won't need to be able to do cymbal harmonics for example to be able to play extreme metal. =P I think head bending is going to work in the future. Brushes, well I certanly hope so but I don't know if it's possible with the current mesh head trend.

But for best kits under 600. I dunno really. I wouldn't buy one. TD9 is propably the way to go for a beginner. Most guys start with that, and hey there were a TD-9 on Groove Essentials 2 too. =) But yeah, I understand, Roland overprizes everything because of lack of decent competition. (1000 euro kick pad, errm what?!) Let's see what NAMM brings us...
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Old 01-11-2010, 12:31 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollyanna View Post
I will watch this space with interest. My issue as well. Another important factor for me is space; I don't want a whole rack of stuff.

I keep trying out the Roland V-Drums Lite in shops but it never grows on me. Trouble is, the module only has a limited range of kit sounds (10) with only two normal acoustic kit settings, and neither are quite what I want.
Hi Polly, One of the bands I play in has a set of Roland TD12s. I think they are great for rehersal and playing in small clubs. I have had them home to dial in sounds. The other good thing about them is they are so quiet. I was screwing around playing to some of the loops that were in the brain, my wife comes down stairs and says, Do you know its 2:00am. Time flies when you are having fun. But in real life I can't stand playing them, They just are not real drums, You cannot be as dynamic as you can with real drums and the rubber hi hat and cymbals are a joke. They hurt my hands and wrist for some reason. Brass bounces better.
I think one or two pads and a decent brain would make a great addition to a drum kit.
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Old 01-11-2010, 12:41 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

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Originally Posted by yesdog View Post
Hi Polly, One of the bands I play in has a set of Roland TD12s. I think they are great for rehersal and playing in small clubs. I have had them home to dial in sounds. The other good thing about them is they are so quiet. I was screwing around playing to some of the loops that were in the brain, my wife comes down stairs and says, Do you know its 2:00am. Time flies when you are having fun. But in real life I can't stand playing them, They just are not real drums, You cannot be as dynamic as you can with real drums and the rubber hi hat and cymbals are a joke. They hurt my hands and wrist for some reason. Brass bounces better.
I think one or two pads and a decent brain would make a great addition to a drum kit.
Thanks for the info, Doggie. It Thing is, it costs over $6k in Oz. I won't be spending much more than that on my next car!

I'll probably just end up getting a kick drum practice pad to augment my current "setup" - a quiet pad on a djembe with two books on top to raise it up higher than the louder pad on my computer chair, plus putting some old towels over my ride cymbal ... and hustle for the band to gig more often :)
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Old 01-11-2010, 12:43 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

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They hurt my hands and wrist for some reason. Brass bounces better.
I agree the rubber is silly, but hurting wrists are only a technique issue. You can't believe how many times that comes up on e-drum forums. And the only solution is to correct your technique. I for one think it's a good thing. =) I have never had hurting hands since and it isn't like you need a special technique for rubber playing. No, you just need to really know how to play with free strokes. Rubber absorbs more energy than a cymbal wanting you to hit it more forcefully, but if you don't know how to hit it without absorbing the energy to your hand, you will have hurting hands. I had it bad, like 5 mins playing and then I had to stop for the night. I think in many ways e-drums are good for practice. This rubber thing is one, mesh heads being silent is one, you can adjust volume which is good for your ears. Then of course you can setup any sound to any pad. Makes it really easy to practice 4-way coordination for example and you can setup closed hihat voices on your bass drum pad and work on your precision. The possibilites are quite endless.
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Old 01-11-2010, 12:43 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

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Originally Posted by Pollyanna View Post
Thanks for the info, Doggie. It Thing is, it costs over $6k in Oz. I won't be spending much more than that on my next car!

I'll probably just end up getting a kick drum practice pad to augment my current "setup" - a quiet pad on a djembe with two books on top to raise it up higher than the louder pad on my computer chair ... and hustle for the band to gig more often :)
My wife got me a set of Vic Firth drum mutes for my B-day. I don't know if its a present for me or for her lol.
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Old 01-11-2010, 12:49 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

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Originally Posted by yesdog View Post
My wife got me a set of Vic Firth drum mutes for my B-day. I don't know if its a present for me or for her lol.
I hope she enjoys the toolkit she's getting :)

The only bummer about mutes is, unless you have two kits, you have to keep setting you kit up and tearing it down when you're playing for real. If you have the space for two kits they're a great idea!
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Old 01-11-2010, 01:56 PM
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I agree the rubber is silly, but hurting wrists are only a technique issue. You can't believe how many times that comes up on e-drum forums. And the only solution is to correct your technique. I for one think it's a good thing. =) I have never had hurting hands since and it isn't like you need a special technique for rubber playing. No, you just need to really know how to play with free strokes. Rubber absorbs more energy than a cymbal wanting you to hit it more forcefully, but if you don't know how to hit it without absorbing the energy to your hand, you will have hurting hands. I had it bad, like 5 mins playing and then I had to stop for the night. I think in many ways e-drums are good for practice. This rubber thing is one, mesh heads being silent is one, you can adjust volume which is good for your ears. Then of course you can setup any sound to any pad. Makes it really easy to practice 4-way coordination for example and you can setup closed hihat voices on your bass drum pad and work on your precision. The possibilites are quite endless.
Its not technique its the mind set of playing real drums. I find if i back off on hitting the cymbals the problem goes away. I still think they suck.
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Old 01-11-2010, 03:25 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

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Its not technique its the mind set of playing real drums. I find if i back off on hitting the cymbals the problem goes away. I still think they suck.
That's what they all say... Yeah, they suck. But at least we don't have wear ear protection in rehearsals.
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Old 01-12-2010, 12:46 AM
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Default Re: Electric kits

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That's what they all say... Yeah, they suck. But at least we don't have wear ear protection in rehearsals.
True! My guys want me to gig with a TD3 kit. Um..NO. More room for them on tiny stages is why. No no no. My acoustic kit sits pretty tight I think.
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Old 01-12-2010, 05:47 AM
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Default Re: Electric kits

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Originally Posted by BassDriver View Post
...OK slightly off topic...

...but I have a friend who plays drums and he thinks that electronic drum kits are cheating.....
As stated above....cheating who? Many in this world do not have the "luxury" of being able to keep acoustic drums. So many, in fact, that Roland is the largest drum manufacture in the world, and they don't make or sell acoustic drums at all. If it's play an e-kit, or don't play at all. Embrace the guy playing the e-kit.
I've played acoustic drums 40+ years. I love drums. I started playing the e-kit 5 or so years ago. And I love them too. Try getting a DW (or any acoustic kit) to sound like tabla, conga, udu, birds chirping, waves crashing on the shore, or a helicopter flying a search pattern in stereo, all at the push of a button and/or a tap of a pad.
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Old 01-12-2010, 06:47 AM
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Default Re: Electric kits

I would highly recommend the yamaha dtxplorer, I just got one like 2 months ago and its got a lot of features for the price. I got a deal on ebay, it cost me 430 bucks in mint condish...
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Old 01-12-2010, 12:03 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

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...can anyone please give a few arguments as to why e-drums are not cheating...
You have to have a set of rules before you can cheat. This topic has been beaten up to death in e-drum forums so it's getting a bit boring. Valid counter arguments are usually: take away the mic from the singer, tell your bass and guitar player to switch acoustic and your keyboard player to get a new acoustic piano and then use absolutely no electricity. At least Keith Jarret would be pleased (he has said electric instruments are just toys, as much as I respect Jarret, I have to say in this respect he's an idiot).

But for most of us we don't have to use any music related arguments. For me for example, I couldn't play AT ALL if I didn't have my e-kit. Or I could only play 4 hours a week at our rehearsal space. So hmm. My choices are: 1. be a lousy drummer with great acoustic kit with great sound or 2. be a decent drummer and be able to practice and for now play a silly plastic kit that sounds decent enough to gig. Wonder which I chose...

I always get a rush of adrenaline from this discussion. First thing I was asked by a very good ELECTRIC bass player when I went to studio with our band was: "when are you going to get REAL drums". I wish I had had more quick mouth back then and just say to him "when are you going to have a real bass then?" but instead I used half an hour to explain my problems with practicing in my apartment and stuff like that. Again I want to punch someone... I gotta by myself a punching bag.

E-kits bring us a new generation of drummers. Not because of the sounds or anything related to them being electric in nature but because of now we can play where ever we need to. In couple of years there are actually drummers who don't live in a cave or woods but be just ordinary people like rest of the musicians, living in the city omg. =P
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Old 01-12-2010, 12:42 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

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E-kits bring us a new generation of drummers. Not because of the sounds or anything related to them being electric in nature but because of now we can play where ever we need to
True enough. Thing is, is it harder to transition to an acoustic kit after practising on e-drums or on a rubber practice pad kit?

There was a thread while ago (can't find it now) about the difficulties of adjusting back to an a-kit after practising on v-drums. Yet, you never hear of people saying how they struggle to adapt to normal kit after playing a set of rubber pads.

Is that because they expect a kit to be be wildly different to pads so there's no expectations? Or is it because lazy habits can form since it's easier to get a great sound on an e-kit? Or maybe, if you can get things sounding good on a pad, then translating those moves to a beautiful set of real drums is inspiring?

I don't know the answers. What I do know is e-drums are more fun, and therefore more inviting, than rubber pads that go "thud". That would get people playing more often. But they are also much more expensive, require more smarts and effort to set up, and usually take up more space.

I'm leaning towards a pad setup but the fat lady hasn't sung yet (you don't want to hear me sing, either :)
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Old 01-12-2010, 01:06 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

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Originally Posted by Pollyanna View Post
Just checked online at a local store. It seems That the Alesis DM5 costs less than the Roland V0Drums Lite - and has 530 more sounds. No contest.

The reviews of the Alesis sometimes complain about glitches and not being able to stand up to heavy punishment, although others give it glowing reports (I'm not a heavy hitter anyway). The only advantage of the V-Drums Lite as far as I can tell is they are simpler and more compact.
Pol, do not buy V-Drums Lite. Terrible pedals. Go and see D and ask him what he can do. Forget Alesis and Yamaha, go with Roland. D knows all about the E kits. Talk to him first.
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Old 01-12-2010, 01:23 PM
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Default Re: Electric kits

Just stole this from another thread. Pearl has "upped the ante"..... http://www.pearldrum.com/epro-preview.html
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Old 01-12-2010, 01:53 PM
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True enough. Thing is, is it harder to transition to an acoustic kit after practising on e-drums or on a rubber practice pad kit?
Luckily I can compare a's and e's weekly and when I first got my e-kit I noticed I had the habit of playing too much with my fingers because of the bounciness of the mesh heads. But soon after that I began to practice purely wrist strokes and after that it really doesn't matter what the material is what I play. Of course from material to material the feel is always _a bit_ different but I think it's not that a big of a deal if you can at least once in a while try out the different feels. Your body remembers. I played quite a bit with acoustics on christmas and it was fun and I can get a lot of different sounds from the drums. It's like 3D where e's are 2D. =P But again, the better your control is, the less you notice any negative difference. Think of Jojo playing on the peperoni pizza on his DVD. =) People have used practice pads for decades, how's that any different?
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Old 01-12-2010, 03:18 PM
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Originally Posted by harryconway View Post
Just stole this from another thread. Pearl has "upped the ante"..... http://www.pearldrum.com/epro-preview.html
that's quite an electronic kit. i was hoping someone would come out with a module that used sounds from fxexpansion/bfd. i see that pearl has finally done that.
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  #32  
Old 01-13-2010, 12:23 AM
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DestinationDrumming DestinationDrumming is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Cheshire, UK
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Default Re: Electric kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollyanna View Post
Are keyboardists cheating when they play organ.
Depends whether they use someone elses hand :o))
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