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  #1  
Old 09-16-2008, 11:47 AM
key.hold key.hold is offline
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Default Remo Coated Pinstripe on snare drum..

what do you think guys? will this head make my 14x5.5 maple snare dead-sounding?
I'm planning to get one. Any inputs would be greatly appreciated. Thanks mucho! :)
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  #2  
Old 09-16-2008, 12:49 PM
Xavia_V3 Xavia_V3 is offline
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Default Re: Remo Coated Pinstripe on snare drum..

I think pinstripe are more for toms tbh :S I may be wrong but I think yould be better off with a coated Powerstroke 3 on your snare (with a Hazy ambassador snare side) - Its what I have on my snare and it sounds sweet loose or tight
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  #3  
Old 09-16-2008, 03:56 PM
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drumtechdad drumtechdad is offline
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Default Re: Remo Coated Pinstripe on snare drum..

Quote:
Originally Posted by key.hold View Post
what do you think guys? will this head make my 14x5.5 maple snare dead-sounding?
Yes.

Quote:
I'm planning to get one. Any inputs would be greatly appreciated. Thanks mucho! :)
It may work for you if you play out miked and want a dead, lifeless sound. If you play out unmiked it will sound like a cardboard box from the audience.

Thousands and thousands of recordings have been made with a standard snare head combo, i.e., coated single-ply 10mil batter and 2 or 3mil hazy reso. You can get a huge variety of sounds out of this combination with appropriate tuning and/or discreet muffling such as moongel.

If you play out unmiked I recommend you avoid 2-plies, rings, dots, and all that other stuff because a muffled snare drum (pins would make it severely muffled) sounds soft and dead from the audience. A bit of ring--a well-tuned snare has a pleasant ring--helps the snare sound loud and lively from the audience. If that kind of sound is too much ring for you in your practice space you can always throw a studio ring on it. (It's always worthwhile to hear your drums, with someone else playing, from a distance in a venue-sized room. Once you do you'll start pulling the muffling off of everything.)

If you play out miked, then you can fool with rings and dots and expect greater success.
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  #4  
Old 09-16-2008, 05:16 PM
TheArchitect
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Default Re: Remo Coated Pinstripe on snare drum..

Quote:
Originally Posted by drumtechdad View Post
Yes.



It may work for you if you play out miked and want a dead, lifeless sound. If you play out unmiked it will sound like a cardboard box from the audience.

Thousands and thousands of recordings have been made with a standard snare head combo, i.e., coated single-ply 10mil batter and 2 or 3mil hazy reso. You can get a huge variety of sounds out of this combination with appropriate tuning and/or discreet muffling such as moongel.

If you play out unmiked I recommend you avoid 2-plies, rings, dots, and all that other stuff because a muffled snare drum (pins would make it severely muffled) sounds soft and dead from the audience. A bit of ring--a well-tuned snare has a pleasant ring--helps the snare sound loud and lively from the audience. If that kind of sound is too much ring for you in your practice space you can always throw a studio ring on it. (It's always worthwhile to hear your drums, with someone else playing, from a distance in a venue-sized room. Once you do you'll start pulling the muffling off of everything.)

If you play out miked, then you can fool with rings and dots and expect greater success.
I would agree that muffled heads like pinstripes and PS3's wouldn't be a good choice. On the other hand a coated emperor is not a bad snare head at all. I play one on one of my Acrolites to add a little meat to the sound of that drum. Still has plenty of ring and bite, just a little beefier on the low end.
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  #5  
Old 09-16-2008, 05:56 PM
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Nodiggie Nodiggie is offline
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Default Re: Remo Coated Pinstripe on snare drum..

may I suggest a coated G2 or coated EC2?

Replacing my EC2 with G2 today.
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  #6  
Old 09-16-2008, 06:24 PM
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Cymbalrider Cymbalrider is offline
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Default Re: Remo Coated Pinstripe on snare drum..

So many people want to dampen snare drums these days. Well I guess if you are one of those people who just beat 2 and 4 and don't play anything musically expressive, I guess it doesn't matter. Coated single ply is always the best option for snares, although 2 ply heads can add that thicker sound. Don't get something muffled though, as dampening the edge prevents the sound from going anywhere. Everyone else will just hear a 'thwack' instead of a nice drum sound.
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  #7  
Old 09-16-2008, 07:17 PM
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stasz stasz is offline
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Default Re: Remo Coated Pinstripe on snare drum..

Quote:
Originally Posted by drumtechdad View Post
Yes.



It may work for you if you play out miked and want a dead, lifeless sound. If you play out unmiked it will sound like a cardboard box from the audience.

Thousands and thousands of recordings have been made with a standard snare head combo, i.e., coated single-ply 10mil batter and 2 or 3mil hazy reso. You can get a huge variety of sounds out of this combination with appropriate tuning and/or discreet muffling such as moongel.

If you play out unmiked I recommend you avoid 2-plies, rings, dots, and all that other stuff because a muffled snare drum (pins would make it severely muffled) sounds soft and dead from the audience. A bit of ring--a well-tuned snare has a pleasant ring--helps the snare sound loud and lively from the audience. If that kind of sound is too much ring for you in your practice space you can always throw a studio ring on it. (It's always worthwhile to hear your drums, with someone else playing, from a distance in a venue-sized room. Once you do you'll start pulling the muffling off of everything.)

If you play out miked, then you can fool with rings and dots and expect greater success.
Great post by drumtechdad. At my school I see kids playing at school events and even in a cafeteria-sized room a muffled snare head only came across to the audience as an unremarkable "chut" sound. The dude playing the kit had to really lay into his snare to get a respectable backbeat for the music he was playing, and nobody wants to have to beat up your drums just to be heard. Try different head combinations and step back to where your audience will be while someone else plays.
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  #8  
Old 09-17-2008, 04:53 AM
key.hold key.hold is offline
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Default Re: Remo Coated Pinstripe on snare drum..

Thanks guys! This is really a big help. :)
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