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  #81  
Old 08-03-2006, 07:32 AM
phillip latimer phillip latimer is offline
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Default Re: double bass or not

thanks everyone i'm thinking about trying the double petal . it has realy helped to have
your advice so again thanks and keep rocking
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  #82  
Old 08-03-2006, 09:35 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

I'd like to dispute some of these Pros and add some cons, just as a word of warning...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tama Player
Double bass is really common now-a-days.

Pros
1. Lots of different techiniques that go with a wide variety
of music
Really? That's funny, because 99.9% of the time I hear double bass it's the same stuff and it seems rather unneccesary and uninspired. You get the odd guy like Thomas Haake who actually uses it to phrase interestingly against other stuff, but about 60% of the time it just gets used to do that little 16th note triplet before a cymbal crash lick, quads and some occasional bursts of 16th notes underneath cymbal rolls, and the other 39.9% is just constant 16ths at a much higher speed with less interesting stuff over the top.

About the only styles where I've heard double pedal actually sound appropriate are metal-derived ones. It sort of works in fusion too, but that's only because fusion is all about showing off and most double-pedal players are all about showing off too.

Quote:
2. can get some serious speed
See last point above.

Quote:
3. over all very nice ;)
That's not a Pro, you're cheating!

Quote:
Cons
1. double bass can be expensive.
2. takes alot of practrice
2. should probably read "Takes a lot of practice to even play uninspired stuff in a competent manner, takes a stupendous amount of practice to do anything interesting".

3. Doesn't add much to the majority of musical styles.

4. The practice time you spend on double pedal could be used practicing any number of more applicable and original material.

5. Affects your setup because you suddenly need more space around the hi-hat stand for the pedal.

6. Makes you start buying stuff like drop-clutches, extra pairs of hi-hats and so forth just so you can have a crisp ride surface.

7. If you don't have any original ideas for what to do with it now then you probably won't after you've bought one and done all the practice.

Ok, so I'm obviously not a fan. But like every other teenage drummer I bought a double pedal at one stage in the game. I learned the "constant 16ths under cheesy grooves" thing, the "16th note triplets leading into a hit" thing, the "huge meltdown ending with quads and fast double kick under the cymbals" thing and all the other standards. Then I realised something: Stuff with heaps of double bass very rarely has even *as much* energy as stuff with the bass drum more widely spaced out. And when it does it's usually from a player who can generate that kind of intensity with a single pedal anyway.

I discovered I was spending all this time working on double kick when actually it was adding less than zero to the quality of my playing. So now the double pedal is just used as a pedal on my practice pad kit, I've not used it live in something like 3.5 years. I just wish I'd realised that before spending the money on the damn thing, they're not cheap.
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  #83  
Old 08-03-2006, 04:36 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

^that's a post that will convince just about anyone not to buy a double pedal.
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  #84  
Old 08-03-2006, 04:56 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bttl
I cant explain how much i think Dualist pedals should be banned and removed from the face of drumming. The whole concept makes me wanna smash things. There are people that learn double bass or fast single pedal work only to have these Dualist 'pedals' (they dont deserve to be called pedals) making light work of hours upon hours of peoples training.

Pathetic!
are we more concerned about making music or having some weird acrobatic skills ?? this is a drummers forum not circus artists' ....... most music directors out there are least bothered about how you create the sound as long as you are GROOVING ..even if that takes to using readymade drum loops instead of actual people ...... period.

pardon me if I come accross too harsh ... but could not help after reading the myopic one sided comment ....
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  #85  
Old 08-03-2006, 06:35 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by finnhiggins
Really? That's funny, because 99.9% of the time I hear double bass it's the same stuff and it seems rather unneccesary and uninspired. You get the odd guy like Thomas Haake who actually uses it to phrase interestingly against other stuff, but about 60% of the time it just gets used to do that little 16th note triplet before a cymbal crash lick, quads and some occasional bursts of 16th notes underneath cymbal rolls, and the other 39.9% is just constant 16ths at a much higher speed with less interesting stuff over the top.

About the only styles where I've heard double pedal actually sound appropriate are metal-derived ones. It sort of works in fusion too, but that's only because fusion is all about showing off and most double-pedal players are all about showing off too.
i'd have to disagree with much of what you are saying and you're "stats". a double pedal is simply a tool that you can attach to your drum kit to allow you execute certain things that wouldn't be possible without it. there are those who use the pedal like you described, ie nothing but 16th note rolls under a groove n' such. but many players in many styles incorporate more than two pedals in their set-up simply because they are as co-ordinated with their feet as they are with their hands.

Thomas Lang has not only a double pedal, but extra pedals controlling hi-hats, jam blocks, and little "splash" hats that he uses to add texture and colour to his playing. ditto Benny Greb.

Terry Bozzio has something like 16 or so pedals attached to his monster kit, and he uses those to create ostinatos that he uses to solo over. and if you go on the vic firth site, you can see Akira Jimbo using not only a double pedal, but controlling his hit-hat at the same time.

Carter Beauford uses his double pedal execute little bass drum "fills" that follow Stefan Lessard's bass line fills. and he also uses it to build tension during the long jam out sections of DMB songs. and do i even have to mention Danney Carey? or Jojo Mayer?

using a double pedal, or any other pedal extentions to your drum kit is the next "step" in incorporating your feet into your playing. using your logic then you should only use 1 hand on the snare drum at a time. is using "double sticks" some sort of cheating or just a way to play 16th note rolls on the snare? well you could learn to do it with one hand. but using two is just that much more effiecient.
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  #86  
Old 08-03-2006, 06:46 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by hungrypo
or Jojo Mayer?
Hmm Jojo is a bad sample, because he never used DB till now. He only sounds like he uses one..sometimes.
He just started three weeks ago - but not many have seen it till now.

Bernhard
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  #87  
Old 08-03-2006, 06:50 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

I waited 25 years before I started playin dbl bass. I have a very good and fast right foot, but there is no way I was gonna triplets at 120bpm (on bd) and play eighths on my ride. It all comes down to what you like. It has helped me with independance, and broadened my thoughts on fills.
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  #88  
Old 08-03-2006, 07:53 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurotica
Double bass makes music "richer". Even if its not speed metal.
Definitely - double bass is better for me.
? I dont have a clue as to why. explain to me please
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  #89  
Old 08-03-2006, 07:56 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by hungrypo
i'd have to disagree with much of what you are saying and you're "stats". a double pedal is simply a tool that you can attach to your drum kit to allow you execute certain things that wouldn't be possible without it. there are those who use the pedal like you described, ie nothing but 16th note rolls under a groove n' such. but many players in many styles incorporate more than two pedals in their set-up simply because they are as co-ordinated with their feet as they are with their hands.

Thomas Lang has not only a double pedal, but extra pedals controlling hi-hats, jam blocks, and little "splash" hats that he uses to add texture and colour to his playing. ditto Benny Greb.

Terry Bozzio has something like 16 or so pedals attached to his monster kit, and he uses those to create ostinatos that he uses to solo over. and if you go on the vic firth site, you can see Akira Jimbo using not only a double pedal, but controlling his hit-hat at the same time.

Carter Beauford uses his double pedal execute little bass drum "fills" that follow Stefan Lessard's bass line fills. and he also uses it to build tension during the long jam out sections of DMB songs. and do i even have to mention Danney Carey? or Jojo Mayer?

using a double pedal, or any other pedal extentions to your drum kit is the next "step" in incorporating your feet into your playing. using your logic then you should only use 1 hand on the snare drum at a time. is using "double sticks" some sort of cheating or just a way to play 16th note rolls on the snare? well you could learn to do it with one hand. but using two is just that much more effiecient.

where's the fun in using two feet? i mean i use double pedals when my bassman asks me to but that's the only time i will.
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  #90  
Old 08-03-2006, 07:59 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by finnhiggins
I'd like to dispute some of these Pros and add some cons, just as a word of warning...



Really? That's funny, because 99.9% of the time I hear double bass it's the same stuff and it seems rather unneccesary and uninspired. You get the odd guy like Thomas Haake who actually uses it to phrase interestingly against other stuff, but about 60% of the time it just gets used to do that little 16th note triplet before a cymbal crash lick, quads and some occasional bursts of 16th notes underneath cymbal rolls, and the other 39.9% is just constant 16ths at a much higher speed with less interesting stuff over the top.

About the only styles where I've heard double pedal actually sound appropriate are metal-derived ones. It sort of works in fusion too, but that's only because fusion is all about showing off and most double-pedal players are all about showing off too.



See last point above.



That's not a Pro, you're cheating!



2. should probably read "Takes a lot of practice to even play uninspired stuff in a competent manner, takes a stupendous amount of practice to do anything interesting".

3. Doesn't add much to the majority of musical styles.

4. The practice time you spend on double pedal could be used practicing any number of more applicable and original material.

5. Affects your setup because you suddenly need more space around the hi-hat stand for the pedal.

6. Makes you start buying stuff like drop-clutches, extra pairs of hi-hats and so forth just so you can have a crisp ride surface.

7. If you don't have any original ideas for what to do with it now then you probably won't after you've bought one and done all the practice.

Ok, so I'm obviously not a fan. But like every other teenage drummer I bought a double pedal at one stage in the game. I learned the "constant 16ths under cheesy grooves" thing, the "16th note triplets leading into a hit" thing, the "huge meltdown ending with quads and fast double kick under the cymbals" thing and all the other standards. Then I realised something: Stuff with heaps of double bass very rarely has even *as much* energy as stuff with the bass drum more widely spaced out. And when it does it's usually from a player who can generate that kind of intensity with a single pedal anyway.

I discovered I was spending all this time working on double kick when actually it was adding less than zero to the quality of my playing. So now the double pedal is just used as a pedal on my practice pad kit, I've not used it live in something like 3.5 years. I just wish I'd realised that before spending the money on the damn thing, they're not cheap.

great points finn I agree wholeheartedly
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  #91  
Old 08-03-2006, 08:18 PM
Drifter in the Dark Drifter in the Dark is offline
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Default Re: double bass or not

My favorite double bass players have always been those who don't use their double pedal all the time. (Kind of ironic when you think about it). Carter Beauford and Tim Alexander ("John the Fisherman", anyone?) are the two best examples I can think of. But whatever you do, do it with taste and it will sound good. You can sound just as good or bad with a single pedal as you can with a double. It's all in how you use your tools.
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  #92  
Old 08-03-2006, 10:50 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bttl
I cant say i am a double pedal fan but if thats what you are looking for and more importnantly what you need in your music style then go for it.

I cant explain how much i think Dualist pedals should be banned and removed from the face of drumming. The whole concept makes me wanna smash things. There are people that learn double bass or fast single pedal work only to have these Dualist 'pedals' (they dont deserve to be called pedals) making light work of hours upon hours of peoples training.

Pathetic!
Well dude, i spent 12 years playing double pedal death/thrash metal in a variety of bands, I now have a duallist triple pedal, (left pedal linked to a slave beater as a normal conventional double pedal works) which means I can play single footed doubles OR standard conventional double pedal style, i switch between the two depending on what is required/what feels best/what polyrhythms sound best from the musical situation.

So congratulations on not knowing what the hell you are talking about. And that is from someone with just over 12 years of non-stop death/thrash metal double pedal playing.
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  #93  
Old 08-04-2006, 12:01 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by phillip latimer
I would like to know the pros and cons of the double bass . I've tryed it once or twise but
not realy enough to say I know anything about how to use them.anthore problem is space
most of the places i've played just didn't have the room to set up all that gear.
thanks
Are you talking about having two base drums or playing with a double pedal?

My kit has two base drums and I love it. I can tune one just a little lower, (not alot lower), than the other and get a nice sound from them. I just like the look of a kit with two base drums.

Yes space can be a problem and you have to haul around an extra drum but it is worth it to me.

Double pedal is nice because you only need one base drum but I didn't like it. It just felt strange to me.
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  #94  
Old 08-04-2006, 12:21 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Meh, I can't say it's really appealed to me that much, I always wanted feet the speed of Bonzo's (sorry for bringing him up), so I stuck with one pedal and have been working on my doubles, general bass drum speed, both heel-down and up, ect. It's ultimatly your desicion, but my advice is that if you get you don't all of a sudden focus on just two feet at a time. Learn to get both feet working evenly and as fast as each other, like beatsMcgee said.
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  #95  
Old 08-04-2006, 12:32 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

I've been playing double for not very long, but I've been practicing non stop on them. I saw someone suggest doing hand rudiments with your feet. Thats definately a good idea and thats what I did. IT works pretty well. And double kick can be in ANY genre....any genre with a drumset involved anyway. Its not so hot in digitally processed trance music probably...
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  #96  
Old 08-04-2006, 12:44 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

I used to own one and learned all the Tool licks and whatnot back when I was 14-15. Double pedal really doesn't have all that much musical application- except for metal or prog rock, or possibly fusion. Not very many players do interesting things with it. Most of the common things that are done with a double pedal can be done with a single pedal and a little bit of woodshedding, ie RLFF RLRLFF RLRLRLFF fills, etc. Exception being those big strings of crossover cymbals BD licks.
99.9999% of things you can do musicially can be done with the single pedal. But if you play those sort of styles that makes a double pedal necessary, then by all means, buy one. If you feel you want it and you don't play this styles, get good at a single pedal first, then buy a double pedal after.
One other thing you may want to consider- you lose control of the hihat pedal as well, which does limit your options.
I guess it's not for me, but if you're digging the sounds, go for it.
And those dualist pedals are terrible, they spit in the face of everyone who's developed a good right foot. Hard to get the strokes even, as well. Just my opinion.
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  #97  
Old 08-04-2006, 12:56 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

thanks for reminding me what i left out of my post.

duallist pedals suck
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  #98  
Old 08-04-2006, 01:27 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

i am with pussycat and deathmetalconga, if youre looking to save space and maintain your current setup but with double bass sound, get the duallist. i just got my double bass electric pad for my electric set for the duallist and cannot wait to finally try it out on an electric kit...

but boy, the thread for the duallist was a sore convo, if you want to go searching for it...

so don't listen to these fools, its all about personal choice and taste. like someone once said about the "duallist debate" is that without advances in drums like the kick pedal or high hat, your feet would never be used...to someone whos never used their feet how would that look to them? like cheating?

all about personal choice, not about cutting corners....

so back to the ORIGINAL question, i would say test the waters, try some different things out and see where you fit in. if double pedal and two bass drums just doesnt feel right at the moment, don't force it. when youre ready, you'll know and go for it.

good luck.
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  #99  
Old 08-04-2006, 01:52 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

only get double bass if you NEED it honestly its better to figure out a way to get it with a single pedal cause that builds your technique qith one pedal ... if ound i started to depend on a double pedal and thats not good
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  #100  
Old 08-04-2006, 01:56 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by dasilvs
so back to the ORIGINAL question, i would say test the waters, try some different things out and see where you fit in. if double pedal and two bass drums just doesnt feel right at the moment, don't force it. when youre ready, you'll know and go for it.
I think this sums it up and is worded better than anyone elses answer. I couldn't agree more.
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  #101  
Old 08-04-2006, 02:09 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
99.9999% of things you can do musicially can be done with the single pedal.
Ouch...That is pretty far from the truth. People like Virgil, Lang, and Grant Collins are showing that you can treat your feet the same as your hands.

They play very intense rudiments with their feet and use them in musical context. You can't play a double stroke roll, flams, or paradiddle combinations, etc using just a single pedal.

These are they types of things the evolution of the instrument have have taken us to. So to say 99.9% of things you can do musically can be done with a single pedal, is pretty misleading by todays standards.
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  #102  
Old 08-04-2006, 02:40 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by toteman2
Ouch...That is pretty far from the truth. People like Virgil, Lang, and Grant Collins are showing that you can treat your feet the same as your hands.

They play very intense rudiments with their feet and use them in musical context. You can't play a double stroke roll, flams, or paradiddle combinations, etc using just a single pedal.

These are they types of things the evolution of the instrument have have taken us to. So to say 99.9% of things you can do musically can be done with a single pedal, is pretty misleading by todays standards.
I definately agree with that. Thomas Lang is amazing with his feet and would like to see the best single pedaller do 99.9999% of the things he does
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  #103  
Old 08-04-2006, 03:03 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by grahamo87
And double kick can be in ANY genre....any genre with a drumset involved anyway.
But how many does it actually add anything to? Rock, sometimes. Metal, usually. Prog, yup. Other stuff...? I can't think of many folk, latin (not fusion-with-some-latin), contemporary (hip-hop/r&b/dance/d&b), blues, jazz, singer-songwriter/soft-rock, pop etc contexts where double pedal adds anything to grooves at all.

The big realisation for me about double pedal came after I got a drum machine / sequencer and started programming a lot of grooves. All of a sudden I had the ability to write all these grooves with syncopated 32nds and god knows what else that would take me years of practice to get to the stage where I could play - and which I was putting in the practice towards, optimistically thinking that the facility would be helpful once I had it.

So I started programming grooves like that. Most drummers do this a bit when they get a sequencer - start programming stuff they can't play. What did I discover? It all sounds like arse! Really. If you have a completely technically-agnostic environment then from a purely musical perspective double-kick stuff doesn't actually sound any good. That's why all the programmed stuff you're hearing out there in hip-hop, dance music etc isn't using it.

The bass drum has a particular role in most grooves - it's an anchor, something that people can lock into when they're dancing. The snare can syncopate around it more, but if you move the bass drum then you dramatically change the feel - see reggae with the "drop" on the three instead of anchoring the one, or latin styles where you have a lot of bass drum syncopation off the start of the bar.

When it comes to bass drum from a purely musical perspective I don't understand this whole "more is better" philosophy. 90% of the time you can make a groove better by just keeping the bass drum to define the "shape" and then working around that.

This, of course, doesn't completely apply in metal. Metal is often all about very aggressive tutti sections with as many instruments doubling a very sharp, syncopated rhythm as possible. So being able to do this with the bass drum can help. But in other styles which aren't about pure aggression? The only things I hear people using double kick for there are things where an 18" tom could often be substituted - little bursts of stuff into a cymbal crash, or another voice in a tom fill or something. The reality is that for the vast majority of this stuff you can - as TheDuke86 said - just re-orchestrate it into hand-foot combinations with a single pedal and train your right foot up.

I've got nothing against the idea of using your feet to play more voices, ala Terry Bozzio, Grant Collins or Thomas Lang. That's just sensible. But why would you need more bass drum? Most of the time more bass drum just muddles up the low end and makes the rhythm section sound less tight and cohesive. Unless you actually have a musical answer to why you'd need more of a particular instrument I don't see the sense in spending a lot of time and money on being able to play more bass drum.
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  #104  
Old 08-04-2006, 03:10 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by grahamo87
I definately agree with that. Thomas Lang is amazing with his feet and would like to see the best single pedaller do 99.9999% of the things he does
He doesn't do that stuff in songs though, does he? Most of the work he does where he actually gets paid to play music has much more sparse bass drum work.

Ditto for Collins, Donati etc. While they might have found some new *technical* possibilities with the feet... go look at a marching band playing any style of music. Do they have the bass drummers playing flam-paradiddles with dynamics in 32nd notes, or are they holding down a more simple pattern? Why is this? Clearly since they're just playing bass drum they could do more if they wanted...

The reason is that most of the time having some guy thrashing away at a bass drum in dense subdivisions doesn't actually sound any good musically, so very few people other than drummers could ever imagine a need for it. And I suspect that most of the drummers who do see a need for it are getting back to OzJazzer's quote over in the jazz thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by OZJazzer
I know many musicians who love their instrument more than they actually like music. This I think applies to many drummers in particular.
It's cool to feel a sense of satisfaction and achievement *technically* in being able to play a flam-ratamacue-diddle-arama with your feet. But what does it actually do for music that composers for larger percussion sections haven't been deliberately discarding as useless for decades?
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  #105  
Old 08-04-2006, 03:34 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
go look at a marching band playing any style of music. Do they have the bass drummers playing flam-paradiddles with dynamics in 32nd notes, or are they holding down a more simple pattern? Why is this? Clearly since they're just playing bass drum they could do more if they wanted...
Actualy, a great deal of the time they do crazy insane runs between them in many different note values, and using many differnet rudiments. Other times they tend to keep it simple when the music calls for it.
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  #106  
Old 08-04-2006, 04:20 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by toteman2
Actualy, a great deal of the time they do crazy insane runs between them in many different note values, and using many differnet rudiments. Other times they tend to keep it simple when the music calls for it.
I'm not necessarily talking about the American ultra-technical approach to marching percussion where stick tricks and speed are as important as the result. I was thinking more of the kind of marching bands that are actually specifically about playing a style of music, rather than competing for prizes.

I'm talking more about the stuff you'd see in South America, or in the Balkans and so forth. Sure, in the world of competitive marching percussion where you're judged on difficulty and flash it's not unreasonable to expect that the technically difficult stuff would float to the surface again. But when it comes to stuff that actually *grooves* it's almost inversely proportional - the more depth and feel a groove has the less the bass drum is doing. Obviously that doesn't apply all the way down to nothing where the bass drum is detracting from the groove whenever it is used, but for me it's certainly the ultimate "less is more" instrument the vast majority of the time.

Would the Purdie Shuffle be better if it had 16th note triplets on the bass drum under it? Would "When the levee breaks" be improved as a groove by playing it as an accent pattern on constant 32nd notes? Probably not. Could you improve your playing of either of them by working on your dynamics with your right foot, your tone with your left hand, your ability to play clean patterns with subtle changes to the pressure on the hi-hat? Almost certainly. So why the emphasis with drummers on double pedals and foot speed/control when so few people have mastered those basic elements of three-way co-ordination with a single pedal? I don't see it actually adds anything musically that the same amount of work on almost anything else wouldn't trump easily.
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Old 08-04-2006, 04:55 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by finnhiggins
I'm not necessarily talking about the American ultra-technical approach to marching percussion where stick tricks and speed are as important as the result. I was thinking more of the kind of marching bands that are actually specifically about playing a style of music, rather than competing for prizes.

I'm talking more about the stuff you'd see in South America, or in the Balkans and so forth. Sure, in the world of competitive marching percussion where you're judged on difficulty and flash it's not unreasonable to expect that the technically difficult stuff would float to the surface again. But when it comes to stuff that actually *grooves* it's almost inversely proportional - the more depth and feel a groove has the less the bass drum is doing. Obviously that doesn't apply all the way down to nothing where the bass drum is detracting from the groove whenever it is used, but for me it's certainly the ultimate "less is more" instrument the vast majority of the time.

Would the Purdie Shuffle be better if it had 16th note triplets on the bass drum under it? Would "When the levee breaks" be improved as a groove by playing it as an accent pattern on constant 32nd notes? Probably not. Could you improve your playing of either of them by working on your dynamics with your right foot, your tone with your left hand, your ability to play clean patterns with subtle changes to the pressure on the hi-hat? Almost certainly. So why the emphasis with drummers on double pedals and foot speed/control when so few people have mastered those basic elements of three-way co-ordination with a single pedal? I don't see it actually adds anything musically that the same amount of work on almost anything else wouldn't trump easily.

I agree with every word 100%...

I remeber this subject came up a while ago on a different thread. All I'm pointing out is that there are musical possibilities that can be obtained with a double pedal, that can't be obtained with a single pedal. Weather or not is sounds good is subjective.

As always Finn---Excellent insight.
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Old 08-04-2006, 05:11 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Ok I think we can all agree that double bass doesn't work in some kinds of music. It sounds good in speed metal but not good in poka, unless of course you are playing speed metal poka.

I'm a two base drum player. I use my right BD the most with my left foot on the hi-hat pedal. I use both BDs together for fills or solos. Soloing is where I find double bass the most useful. Yea I can do doubles and triplets on a single pedal but I like double better. It is really just a matter of taste and what works better for me.

Last edited by Fur drummer; 08-04-2006 at 05:24 AM.
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Old 08-04-2006, 05:31 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

I've aways seen the double pedal as a useful tool. Of course, I play metal most of the time. When I played with the school jazz band, there was never a need for it. When I just practice at home with different genres, I rarely use it. Sometimes when I play with a more funkish feel I'll use it for some fills. Three on the hands, three on the feet. It doesn't ever seem to fit too well playing that real fast though, so most of the time I could be playing the three on the bass with one foot.
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Old 08-05-2006, 10:00 AM
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Default Re: double bass or not

dont like double pedal or double bass, to me its cheating, cause especially if you're playing punk/metal or watever, you can go really fast really easy, wat would be an accoplishment would be to go really fast with one foot.

thats just me though
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Old 01-13-2007, 12:04 PM
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Default Re: Too Double Bass or not to Double Bass

hmm....
i've got three bass drums, so i have both :-P
2x dw 5000 single pedal
1x pearl P-101P double pedal
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Old 01-13-2007, 05:05 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by gusty View Post
dont like double pedal or double bass, to me its cheating, cause especially if you're playing punk/metal or watever, you can go really fast really easy, wat would be an accoplishment would be to go really fast with one foot.

thats just me though
Ive said this before though, and I dont even play double bass. You can work so hard and so long to be able to do everything except flamming with a single stick, but why would you? If we scoff at innovation we will never have technical progression within the drumset.
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Old 01-30-2007, 07:07 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

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Originally Posted by brittc89 View Post
Ive said this before though, and I dont even play double bass. You can work so hard and so long to be able to do everything except flamming with a single stick, but why would you? If we scoff at innovation we will never have technical progression within the drumset.
Could anybody have said that any better, I think not.
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  #114  
Old 02-17-2007, 01:53 PM
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Default Re: Too Double Bass or not to Double Bass

Most of the time a double pedal is not needed BUT there are times it is! I can roll pretty fast on a single pedal but not as fast as I could with a double pedal! A double pedal to me is just like playing two bass drums but you only have one! I also disagree with being taught to play traditional grip instead of match grip! I wished back in school I had learned on double bass drum and had been taught match grip it would have saved me from learning it later and retraining my grip!
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Old 08-24-2007, 02:54 PM
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Default Re: Too Double Bass or not to Double Bass

I either use heel to toe, or rely on rebound from the bass drum. but when I feel lazy i reach for the double pedal.
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  #116  
Old 09-10-2007, 02:29 AM
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Default Re: Too Double Bass or not to Double Bass

Ive been playing for a little over a year now and ive decided on getting a double bass pedal.
I put of getting one to begin with so i wouldnt be tempted to use double bass in places where with a bit of practice it could be rolled off with a single. I am far more impressed with really good use of a single pedal but I think that double bass is just another skill that one can master.
I personally dont think its a matter of being ready skill-wise, its your philosophy and self discipline that has to be right.
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Old 09-10-2007, 02:59 AM
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Default Re: To Double Bass or not to Double Bass

If your name is "Latin Groover" I would advise against the double bass.
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  #118  
Old 09-10-2007, 03:33 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by gusty View Post
dont like double pedal or double bass, to me its cheating, cause especially if you're playing punk/metal or watever, you can go really fast really easy, wat would be an accoplishment would be to go really fast with one foot.

thats just me though
You have to realize people like Tim Waterson who do their best to have all the speed they can on the bass drum are as fast as it is realistically possible to be. Each foot is about to it's human limit. It's not like really fast double bass players don't work on single, it's SO important to have each foot fast individually.
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Old 09-10-2007, 06:20 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Pasquini View Post
You have to realize people like Tim Waterson who do their best to have all the speed they can on the bass drum are as fast as it is realistically possible to be. Each foot is about to it's human limit. It's not like really fast double bass players don't work on single, it's SO important to have each foot fast individually.
If you are a DRUMMER you can play with or without a double pedal.
I always try to play as much as I can with one foot as long as I dont loose the GROOVE...
PS my right foot is much faster than 1/2 of both feet.........LOL
Tim
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Old 09-10-2007, 07:38 PM
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Default Re: double bass or not

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Waterson View Post
If you are a DRUMMER you can play with or without a double pedal.
I always try to play as much as I can with one foot as long as I dont loose the GROOVE...
PS my right foot is much faster than 1/2 of both feet.........LOL
Tim
I use my single pedal a ton more than my double.

You're killer man. I'm trying to work on double bass groove but it always seems as though double bass really becomes too much of a focus. I guess it's just a constant struggle.

As a side note, what's your left foot 10 second speed?
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