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  #1  
Old 07-05-2015, 01:34 PM
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sdrum177 sdrum177 is offline
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Default Stain on my pedal board

Hey Guys
Need some advice here…
This is my tama hi hat stand. As you can see, the foot board has some stain on it. I can't recall how it happened. I guess my shoe was probably dirty wile I was playing…
I tried to clean it with an alcohol but it didn't help a bit.
What are you suggesting to do? What kind of cleaning material can remove it?
I have a groove juice at home (for cymbals cleaning) do you think it can do something? (Off coarse without harming)

Thanks
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Old 07-05-2015, 02:23 PM
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Jeff Almeyda Jeff Almeyda is offline
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Default Re: Stain on my pedal board

The pedal board is made of aluminum. Bare aluminum will oxidize just like bare steel will (rust).

If it bugs you, you can take an abrasive pad such as scotch brite or steel wool to rub it off. But it will continue to happen unless you continue to maintain it.

The parts should be anodized but they are not in an attempt to cut costs.
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Old 07-06-2015, 09:01 AM
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Default Re: Stain on my pedal board

Thanks Man. i'll try to do that....
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Old 07-06-2015, 11:24 AM
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gdmoore28 gdmoore28 is offline
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Default Re: Stain on my pedal board

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Almeyda View Post
The pedal board is made of aluminum. Bare aluminum will oxidize just like bare steel will (rust).

If it bugs you, you can take an abrasive pad such as scotch brite or steel wool to rub it off. But it will continue to happen unless you continue to maintain it.

The parts should be anodized but they are not in an attempt to cut costs.
Stop! That's not oxidation. Aluminum oxidation is whitish in color and powdery. Using steel wool on the pedal will destroy the uniformity of the machine grooves and leave a permanent imperfection. All you have there is something greasy that has made itself at home in the grooves of the aluminum. Alcohol will not touch it. You will need to use an aluminum-safe de-greaser and rub it into the grooves with an old toothbrush. Do it several times if necessary. Easy, simple.

GeeDeeEmm

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Old 07-07-2015, 09:00 AM
dzarren dzarren is offline
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Default Re: Stain on my pedal board

Yes indeed. That is just something on the aluminum, not a chemical or any sort of physical changes have occurred, likely.
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Old 07-07-2015, 05:39 PM
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Jeff Almeyda Jeff Almeyda is offline
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Default Re: Stain on my pedal board

Quote:
Originally Posted by gdmoore28 View Post
Stop! That's not oxidation. Aluminum oxidation is whitish in color and powdery. Using steel wool on the pedal will destroy the uniformity of the machine grooves and leave a permanent imperfection. All you have there is something greasy that has made itself at home in the grooves of the aluminum. Alcohol will not touch it. You will need to use an aluminum-safe de-greaser and rub it into the grooves with an old toothbrush. Do it several times if necessary. Easy, simple.

GeeDeeEmm

GeeDeeEmm
It is oxidation. I understand your conceren but I assure you I know what I'm talking about.

I actually own an aerospace aluminum processing plant. (www.MasterMetal.com)

Aluminum can bond with organics, such as grease, and actually form an oxidative layer which resists normal cleaning procedures. That layer appears as a dark stain, similar to a heat-treat stain. The "white rust" you are referring to is a result of long-term exposure. Totally different type of oxidation.

Do be careful with how much pressure you apply, but if you use a mild abrasive, possibly even baking soda on a rag, you will find that the stain goes away.

I scotch brite my Axis pedals regularly. I had my first pair for over 15 years.
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Old 07-07-2015, 10:56 PM
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Default Re: Stain on my pedal board

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Almeyda View Post
It is oxidation. I understand your conceren but I assure you I know what I'm talking about.

I actually own an aerospace aluminum processing plant. (www.MasterMetal.com)

Aluminum can bond with organics, such as grease, and actually form an oxidative layer which resists normal cleaning procedures. That layer appears as a dark stain, similar to a heat-treat stain. The "white rust" you are referring to is a result of long-term exposure. Totally different type of oxidation.

Do be careful with how much pressure you apply, but if you use a mild abrasive, possibly even baking soda on a rag, you will find that the stain goes away.

I scotch brite my Axis pedals regularly. I had my first pair for over 15 years.
Naturally, Jeff, I must bow to your greater expertise in the metallurgical field, and it seems that we have both actually concluded that the offending area - call it oxidation - is the result of the aluminum "having bonded with organics, such as grease." So, whether the observed anomoly is still an oily substance or has actually progressed to the point of having oxidized, can we both agree that the most prudent initial attempt at solving the problem would be the use of an aluminum-safe liquid cleanser rubbed into the grooves with a fine brush? Were it not for the textured surface of the pedal board, I would agree that the OP could safely clean away with 0000 steel wool or a fine Scotchbrite pad, but I'm quite concerned that any abrasive will play havoc with that fine grooved surface. Getting to the bottom of those grooves will require quite a bit of pressure, and I'm certain that the top of the grooves would give in first. Thanks for being quite the gentleman in your reasoned reply. I'm sure we both have the OP's best interest at heart.

Kind regards,
GeeDeeEmm

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