DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > Drum Gear > Other Gear

Other Gear Discuss Hardware and all other equipment not covered in the other topics

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 11-13-2007, 09:08 PM
zambizzi's Avatar
zambizzi zambizzi is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Big Bad Boise
Posts: 4,047
Default CAD Drum Mics

I'm sorry if this has been asked but I tried searching "CAD" and "CAD Microphones" but both searches don't allow the word "CAD" because it's "too short to be included in the search". Seems like a silly limitation...but anyhow...

I'm looking at a CAD drum mic set to cut a decent demo in my home studio. It's this bad boy right here:

http://www.guitarcenter.com/CAD-Prem...64-i1126882.gc

Anyone have these? I can spend up to $400 on drum mics and typically play a 5pc kit (kick, snare, 1 tom up, 2 toms floor, ride, hats, 2 crashes, 1 splash).

What would be better for my budget, if anything?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-13-2007, 09:48 PM
DaveyBoy DaveyBoy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 112
Default Re: CAD Drum Mics

http://www.harmony-central.com/ Are great for reviews.

Dave
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-13-2007, 10:51 PM
drumr0's Avatar
drumr0 drumr0 is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Gordonsville, Tn.
Posts: 655
Default Re: CAD Drum Mics

I have a set of CAD mics and can say they have done a good job for me doing live shows. I have not done any recording with them though. The kit you are looking at is a step up from the one I have (PRO-7). The condensers in my kit sound really nice and do a real good job. I think the weakest link is the kick mic. It does an ok job, but I have heard better. I also have to run the tom mics pretty hot to match the rest of the mics.

I used an Audix mic set up a while back (the D series) and they really sounded good. If you have $400 budget I would pobably get an Audix or Shure mic kit and some condensers if you can spend a little more.

All in all I would say you wouldn't be dissapointed with the CAD's they sound pretty good, and for the price they are good, but there are better mics for sure.
__________________
My Kit- DW--Paiste--Sabian--Gibraltar--http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...ad.php?t=30002
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-14-2007, 03:23 AM
somexone75's Avatar
somexone75 somexone75 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 156
Default Re: CAD Drum Mics

Personally would recommend Shure as number one and CAD as number two on the list, but I come from a sound recording world. I always try to get the true sound. I'm pretty sure there are more cost efficient setups, but in the recording world you get what you pay for. An age old proverb from the recording world, your recording is only as good as your gear. If you buy the cheap stuff a/i Nady, Beringer, or any cables other than Mogami or Monster you won't get the true potential out of your gear and will get a sound that is not true.

I know there are going to be people who will say there is nothing wrong with some cheap product, but have you tried the high quality gear. I think not.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-14-2007, 03:35 AM
SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ's Avatar
SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Louisiana Swamp
Posts: 1,739
Default Re: CAD Drum Mics

Since you have $400, have you considered buying a couple of better quality mics as opposed to a budget set? You can get a great sound from your kit with just two or three mics, then add on as you can afford it.
__________________
Listen to WWOZ
Tape Op
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-14-2007, 11:51 PM
bojangleman's Avatar
bojangleman bojangleman is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 1,840
Default Re: CAD Drum Mics

well. this option deponds on the size of your kit. which like sleeply said, you could always just buy some overheads and get the whole set. but if your kit happens to be a 4 piece. here is a shure set up..really good price for a quality product i think. here is the link :
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Shure-PG...98-i1126561.gc
hope this could help ya!

Alex
__________________
Band:
http://www.myspace.com/springloadedcomeback
Add Us!
CHRISTIAN DRUMMERS ARMY
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-15-2007, 12:13 AM
drumr0's Avatar
drumr0 drumr0 is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Gordonsville, Tn.
Posts: 655
Default Re: CAD Drum Mics

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bojangleman View Post
well. this option deponds on the size of your kit. which like sleeply said, you could always just buy some overheads and get the whole set. but if your kit happens to be a 4 piece. here is a shure set up..really good price for a quality product i think. here is the link :
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Shure-PG...98-i1126561.gc
hope this could help ya!

Alex
I think that would be the way to go also.. That is a good deal!!
__________________
My Kit- DW--Paiste--Sabian--Gibraltar--http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...ad.php?t=30002
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-15-2007, 04:16 AM
somexone75's Avatar
somexone75 somexone75 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 156
Default Re: CAD Drum Mics

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bojangleman View Post
well. this option deponds on the size of your kit. which like sleeply said, you could always just buy some overheads and get the whole set. but if your kit happens to be a 4 piece. here is a shure set up..really good price for a quality product i think. here is the link :
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Shure-PG...98-i1126561.gc
hope this could help ya!

Alex

That would be a very good home start up mic cabinet, but he would also need to consider the cost of the Drum mounting clamps or Mic stands (which I would not recommend due to size and they really get in the way while you play). I think you should wait a few months and save up a little more money and get everything at once. Something I have learned is don't just buy the cheap stuff to later replace it with the better stuff, just be patient and buy the good stuff.

Take your time making the decision, you won't regret it.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-15-2007, 04:55 PM
zambizzi's Avatar
zambizzi zambizzi is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Big Bad Boise
Posts: 4,047
Default Re: CAD Drum Mics

Yeah, I think I'd prefer quality over quantity, as well. I'm playing a 5pc (3 toms, 1 kick, 1 snare) and my cymbal setup consists of 1 ride, 1 pair hats, and 2 crashes.

I think if I had one mic for the two floor toms, it'd be fine....one for the 10" up top, 1 kick mic, a snare mic, and condensers above me...I'd be fine....wouldn't I?

Those Shure mics look great...a bit expensive but probably worth it.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-15-2007, 05:04 PM
drumr0's Avatar
drumr0 drumr0 is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Gordonsville, Tn.
Posts: 655
Default Re: CAD Drum Mics

Quote:
Originally Posted by zambizzi View Post
Yeah, I think I'd prefer quality over quantity, as well. I'm playing a 5pc (3 toms, 1 kick, 1 snare) and my cymbal setup consists of 1 ride, 1 pair hats, and 2 crashes.

I think if I had one mic for the two floor toms, it'd be fine....one for the 10" up top, 1 kick mic, a snare mic, and condensers above me...I'd be fine....wouldn't I?

Those Shure mics look great...a bit expensive but probably worth it.
Yes, especially if you went with the Shure kit, The CAD tom mics have to be run pretty hot so I don't know about splitting one between two drums, but I believe the Shure mics would do it with no issues. I have set mine (CAD's) with a kick snare and just the 2 condensors and get just about as good of sound with that setup as I do running the tom mics.
__________________
My Kit- DW--Paiste--Sabian--Gibraltar--http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...ad.php?t=30002
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 11-15-2007, 05:27 PM
Red Hawk's Avatar
Red Hawk Red Hawk is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 255
Default Re: CAD Drum Mics

if you're running overheads, you really don't need to close-mic the toms.

If I had only 400 bucks to spend on drum mics, I think I would wait a little longer to buy anything and save up a few hundred more. I bought a set of Nadys once and they were the worst waste of money ever. They died a spectacular death one day when a friend of mine switched on the phantom power to them. I think the best thing those mics ever did was stop working.

The worst part about all those drum mic packages is usually the kick mic. This is especially true with the Shure PG series. That would be a good starter setup, but I would sell the PG kick mic and get a Beta 52 right away.

My dream setup (that I'm lucky enough to have) is 2 Beta 52s, 2 Beta 57s and 4 Beta 98s. The 52s go on the kick and my 18" roto tom, the 57s go on the snare(s) and the 98s go on the toms and hi hat.

With the thread starter's kit, he could get away with one less 52 and one less 98, use the 57s on the snare and hi hat. All that gear could be had, used, for about 800 bucks if you look hard enough.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-16-2007, 03:48 AM
somexone75's Avatar
somexone75 somexone75 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 156
Default Re: CAD Drum Mics

Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Hawk View Post
if you're running overheads, you really don't need to close-mic the toms.

If I had only 400 bucks to spend on drum mics, I think I would wait a little longer to buy anything and save up a few hundred more. I bought a set of Nadys once and they were the worst waste of money ever. They died a spectacular death one day when a friend of mine switched on the phantom power to them. I think the best thing those mics ever did was stop working.

The worst part about all those drum mic packages is usually the kick mic. This is especially true with the Shure PG series. That would be a good starter setup, but I would sell the PG kick mic and get a Beta 52 right away.

My dream setup (that I'm lucky enough to have) is 2 Beta 52s, 2 Beta 57s and 4 Beta 98s. The 52s go on the kick and my 18" roto tom, the 57s go on the snare(s) and the 98s go on the toms and hi hat.

With the thread starter's kit, he could get away with one less 52 and one less 98, use the 57s on the snare and hi hat. All that gear could be had, used, for about 800 bucks if you look hard enough.
Ya anything by Nady sucks like none other. Sm57's and the beta 52 kick is the way to go. Over heads are nice, but sometimes they are weird and don't pick up everything you want and at the right dynamic, but overhead is the way to go for the cymbals. You get the same result from micing every cymbal individually if you go it right. Just look up on Google how to mic cyms using X-Y overhead. Just save up for a while and buy a 8 XLR input 8 channel mixer and the hardware you'd need to mic up you set.

And for the record, if the mic gives you the XLR option take it because the XLR output gives you a ground so it won't overpower itself than take a lot of wear and tear from simple tasks. XLR cable tip Don't buy the cheap ones because they are only two wired instead of 3 so there is no ground so they can't get rid of excess power.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11-16-2007, 06:10 AM
SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ's Avatar
SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ SLEEPY BRiGHT EYEZ is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Louisiana Swamp
Posts: 1,739
Default Re: CAD Drum Mics

Quote:
Originally Posted by somexone75 View Post
And for the record, if the mic gives you the XLR option take it because the XLR output gives you a ground so it won't overpower itself than take a lot of wear and tear from simple tasks. XLR cable tip Don't buy the cheap ones because they are only two wired instead of 3 so there is no ground so they can't get rid of excess power.
XLR cables are balanced. Some TRS (1/4") cables are balanced as well. The benefit of a balanced cable is that there are two conducting wires isolated from the ground. Unbalanced lines have grounds as well. In an unbalanced cable, the negative conductor shares the path with the ground. Cables behave like antennas, so they pick up interference which translates into noise.

In a balanced line, one conductor carries the audio signal as received by the source. The other conductor carries the signal out of phase. Any noise picked up by the cable is in phase. At the balanced input, the signal from the out of phase conductor is reversed to be in phase with the other conductor. Not only is the audio signal flipped, but so is the noise carried by that conductor. So, in the end, the audio signal doubles in amplitude and the noise ideally cancels itself out.

Balanced cables give you a stronger audio signal with less noise than an unbalanced cable. The benefit of using an XLR cable over a balanced TRS cable is that the XLR has a locking mechanism to help prevent the cable from being unplugged during use.
__________________
Listen to WWOZ
Tape Op
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com