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  #1  
Old 11-10-2007, 07:16 PM
rhythmjunkie rhythmjunkie is offline
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Default Ted Reed's Syncopation

I feel that Reed's SYNCOPATION is the be all-end all, must have basic, all around book for every drummer to work out of. I wanted to see what exercises drummers on the forum were able to get out of it and how they've helped (maybe it could open a lot doors for the uninformed). I've worked it, swinging the notes, while in swing pattern, by executing the material with my left hand on the snare (like Chapins "Modern Drummer"). Also, while in swing, with 2 and 4 rim clicks, doing the exercises with my bass drum. Talk about breaking free. This totally opens up your body to so much more. And then also, a Bossa Nova ( bossa bass and hi hat, eighth note ride) and doing the exercises as the bossa rim click. Really cool. Let us know what you've guy's (and gals) have gotten out of this book.
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Old 11-11-2007, 06:37 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

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Originally Posted by rhythmjunkie View Post
I feel that Reed's SYNCOPATION is the be all-end all, must have basic, all around book for every drummer to work out of. I wanted to see what exercises drummers on the forum were able to get out of it and how they've helped (maybe it could open a lot doors for the uninformed). I've worked it, swinging the notes, while in swing pattern, by executing the material with my left hand on the snare (like Chapins "Modern Drummer"). Also, while in swing, with 2 and 4 rim clicks, doing the exercises with my bass drum. Talk about breaking free. This totally opens up your body to so much more. And then also, a Bossa Nova ( bossa bass and hi hat, eighth note ride) and doing the exercises as the bossa rim click. Really cool. Let us know what you've guy's (and gals) have gotten out of this book.
I started a Ted Reed thread a while back asking how to approach his book. It sounds like you have really done some exploring.
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Old 11-11-2007, 04:05 PM
rhythmjunkie rhythmjunkie is offline
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Yeah, I've been blessed to come across a few really good teachers that have opened these doors to me. I think being syncopated is about the most important thing a drummer can be (aside from taste and feel). I refer to it as being a "factory" behind a drumkit. This is when you can really accomplish what you want to do behind a drumkit. You'l flow more and more will be going on. Working execises like this regularly, will greatly enhance this ability.
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  #4  
Old 11-12-2007, 04:02 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

In addition to what you've done, playing the written Snare part and filling in any eighth note (not played on SD) with the kick. Then have kick play the written Snare part and fill in missing 8ths with the SD.
There's an Alan Dawson book that takes one through many different useful applications with the Ted Reed book.
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  #5  
Old 11-12-2007, 04:21 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

wow guys this is too cool. I haven't touched that book in 29 years. I just started teaching my son, it was my first book and thought I would start him there as well. Now I am going to have to dig into it for myself. Thanks for in inspiration!!
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  #6  
Old 11-12-2007, 04:37 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

One exercise that I came up with the other day is playing all the long notes (quarters, tied eighths) with the bass drum, all the short notes (eighths) with the left foot/hi-hat, and filling the spaces with the hands playing triplets. You could also just fill with your left hand and play a jazz ride cymbal pattern.

It's a great Independence exercise and it really helps your linear playing.
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  #7  
Old 11-12-2007, 06:03 AM
rhythmjunkie rhythmjunkie is offline
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

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Originally Posted by pasta View Post
In addition to what you've done, playing the written Snare part and filling in any eighth note (not played on SD) with the kick. Then have kick play the written Snare part and fill in missing 8ths with the SD.
There's an Alan Dawson book that takes one through many different useful applications with the Ted Reed book.
Yeah, the teacher I'm studying with right now studied with Alan Dawson. He was with him (not at the actual moment) when he died.
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  #8  
Old 11-12-2007, 07:04 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Do the ol' swing ride with snare filling in each second and third partial of the triplet. Then play the line with the bass drum. Fantastic for coordination and lining up your hands with your feet. Sounds great too.
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Old 11-12-2007, 03:04 PM
rhythmjunkie rhythmjunkie is offline
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

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Originally Posted by jazzin' View Post
Do the ol' swing ride with snare filling in each second and third partial of the triplet. Then play the line with the bass drum. Fantastic for coordination and lining up your hands with your feet. Sounds great too.
The possibilities are endless!
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  #10  
Old 12-13-2007, 11:35 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Hi all, new to the forum here, pretty cool

I took from alan years back and one nice way of using the book was to play the line alternating hands (triplets) on the snare, on the short notes (1/8) play accents on the snare on the long play accented cymbal and bass. (LF 2,4).

After you get this make the fill in notes that are on the snare (the ones not accented and not on the cymbal) double stroke still keeping the triplet feel going.
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  #11  
Old 12-18-2007, 09:29 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

In case anyone was wondering about the Alan Dawson book, it's called "The Drummer's Complete Vocabulary as Taught by Alan Dawson," by John Ramsay.

I've worked, somewhat halfheartedly, out of this book for the last year or so. It has a lot of useful exercises that seem like common sense but somehow I've overlooked over the years. All the various syncopation exercises are quite valuable. I think there are 40 variations.

Here's the link to it on amazon.
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  #12  
Old 12-23-2007, 12:17 AM
Shanek2039 Shanek2039 is offline
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Default Ted Reed's Syncopation

The book is essential for every drummer. Ted Reeds "Syncopation" and George lawrence Stone's "Stick Control" kept me occupied for HOURS behind my kit!

I always loved accenting the accented notes in the 8th note triplet section with a crash and bass drum, and changing every note in between into a light double stroke. Bring the dynamics up and down... It sounds great.

try it out!!!


Im not a massive jazz player, so forgive me if that pattern is standard for some of you!!
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  #13  
Old 12-26-2007, 11:42 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Thought just occurred to me, to translate it into a more modern hip-hop/groove approach to match what I've been seeing lately, why not play the figures as accented 16ths or 32nds on the hi hat while keeping a 2 and 4 backbeat on the snare and something on the bass drum (I don't know, you figure that part out).
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  #14  
Old 01-02-2008, 07:39 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Like everyone’s pointed out, TONS of stuff from interpretations of this book. I just got a video camera, so I thought I’d share one of my favorites. My teacher claims to be able to replicate the effects of any technique book he’s ever seen with interpretations of this book (especially the full page exercises that start around p. 38, depending on what printing of the book you have) and I believe him. One of my favorites is the paradiddle interpretation. You can explore this interpretation to find some fun stuff –there are many interpretations of this interpretation if you will.
Stick with me because this is really awkward to describe (at least for me) but it’s not as complicated as it sounds: The paradiddle interpretation is somewhat of a misnomer because it’s not purely a paradiddle sticking. Working with ‘exercise one’ on or about p.38, think of the top line as a melody and ignore the bottom line of quarter notes for now. You’re going to ‘diddle’ around the melody by playing it as single stroke accents that will determine your paradiddle-esque sticking pattern. Each note represents a single stroke accent –and the first note on the page is the first note of a 16th note paradiddle. On each succeeding accent written on the page that’s less than 4 16th notes from the accent tha preceeds it, the paradiddle re-starts from the last accent. For any rest that’s a quarter note or longer, play a double stroke roll so, the first line goes:
R l (start again -> R l rr L r (start again -> L r l l R l r r L r l l R l r r (go to double stroke roll) l l R l r r L r L r l l R l r r L r L r l l R l R l R l r r L r L r l l r r l l
--but the point (and one of the main, fundamental concepts of all interpretations of syncopation that I learned from my teacher) is not to think about all the Rs and Ls because that’s baffling and gives a headache worse than cheap burbon. Rather, think about the melody –sing it to yourself ‘do bop, do bop ,bop, bop, bop …etc. and let that guide your sticking pattern
So, played slowly, the first line of ‘exercise one’ looks like this: (and go easy on the 'ol hand techniqe here, I'm no pro, haha)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5fXy6RVSgnc
And here’s the whole page at a moderate tempo:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z25ghOmjxno

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  #15  
Old 01-02-2008, 04:25 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Great book, I found mine not too long ago. A bit dusty but still in ok shape. I studied with a teacher in the Boston area here named Frank Shooshan great teacher and person. I believe he passed away. His ride cymbal patterns are still clearly ledgeable over each lesson in the book. This book was my favorite by far.
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  #16  
Old 01-04-2008, 12:02 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

I once took lessons from a drummer named Steve Gillis who had me play page 38 from Syncopation, playing the notes written with bass drum & right and left side cymbals filling in the holes with 16ths on snare (with similar sticking to what Auger wrote) and constant 8ths on the hi hat w/foot... that was the first time I saw syncopation, the book, being used in a drum set manner. I was blown away. I believe those lessons were some of the best drum lessons I ever received.
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  #17  
Old 11-30-2011, 04:43 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

The "Short-Note/Long-Note" Jazz interpretation while filling in the spaces with snares in triplets is sick!
If you really want to exercise those chops, represent each note (either eighth or quarter) as a four-stroke ruff. Fill in all of the spaces with sixteenth notes
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  #18  
Old 11-30-2011, 07:42 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

I've done tons of independence stuff out of this book like I'm sure many here have also. The downside though is that when swinging the 8ths you'll never play the middle beat of the triplet or any sort of quarter note triplet figure. That's where John Riley's "The Art of Bop Drumming" comes out on top in my opinion.

This may seem sacrilegious, but I'll say it: It's not the book that's great, it's how you manipulate the patterns in it outside of the book's originally intended context that is great, (but as I mentioned falls short in triplet mode for me).
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  #19  
Old 11-30-2011, 08:54 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

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Originally Posted by BillBachman View Post
I've done tons of independence stuff out of this book like I'm sure many here have also. The downside though is that when swinging the 8ths you'll never play the middle beat of the triplet or any sort of quarter note triplet figure. That's where John Riley's "The Art of Bop Drumming" comes out on top in my opinion.

This may seem sacrilegious, but I'll say it: It's not the book that's great, it's how you manipulate the patterns in it outside of the book's originally intended context that is great, (but as I mentioned falls short in triplet mode for me).
A workaround for this issue would be to interpret the upbeats as second notes of the triplet, or as a reverse shuffle rhythm if you will:



You could also interpret the upbeats as 16th note upbeats, i.e. "es" or "as". This opens up many new possibilities for developing different 16th note based ideas.
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  #20  
Old 11-30-2011, 09:01 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Agree with you totally Bill, and I feel the same about the 'missing' note.
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  #21  
Old 11-30-2011, 05:11 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Play a 3/4 swing pattern in the right hand and comp with the left hand/bass drum/hi-hat in the following ways:

-all patterns on snare
-all patterns on kick
-all patterns on hi-hat (w/ foot)
-short notes with hi-hat, long with kick
-short notes with snare, long with kick


After you get this down, switch to brushes and play a 3/4 brush pattern while going back through all of the exercises with the feet.

Since the exercises are phrased in 4/4, you'll be playing over the barline so to speak...some really cool phrases come out of reading it this way.

One of my favorite applications is to play the short notes on a tom, long notes on the cymbals w/ kick, and fill in the spaces with a triplet roll. Really applicable in a melodic swing solo.
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  #22  
Old 11-30-2011, 06:12 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Ted Reed taught Chuck Norris how to play drums.
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  #23  
Old 11-30-2011, 07:08 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

I have learned an incredible amount from studying from "Syncopation", and I wanted to add a new perspective to the conversation here. I have been inspired by the Dawson book to use the melodies of standards as the source of my rhythmic material as opposed to "Syncopation", and I have developed a whole method based on this approach. This method is still very much influenced by "Syncopation", but in my opinion has a number of unique advantages. Here is a link to an example of one of my exercises, check it out.

http://haredrums.blogspot.com/2011/1...-response.html
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Old 11-30-2011, 09:44 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillBachman View Post
I've done tons of independence stuff out of this book like I'm sure many here have also. The downside though is that when swinging the 8ths you'll never play the middle beat of the triplet or any sort of quarter note triplet figure. That's where John Riley's "The Art of Bop Drumming" comes out on top in my opinion.

This may seem sacrilegious, but I'll say it: It's not the book that's great, it's how you manipulate the patterns in it outside of the book's originally intended context that is great, (but as I mentioned falls short in triplet mode for me).
There was a book that came out in 1990 by Brian Alpert and Dave Palamar called "4's: the Complete Guide to Learning Syncopation" that addressed this very issue (that of the middle triplet note)--they included a section in the back which had a supplement of exercises that utilized the middle triplet note, to make up for the lack of such exercises in the original book. Unfortunately, I think this book is out of print--it doesn't even look like Steve Weiss carries it anymore. However, if you can find it, it would be worth picking it up.

Ed Pierce
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  #25  
Old 11-30-2011, 10:04 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

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I have ...developed a whole method based on this approach. This method is still very much influenced by "Syncopation", but in my opinion has a number of unique advantages. ...[/url]
Andrew I'd really like to buy a copy of the book when it is done - is it done?
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  #26  
Old 12-01-2011, 04:38 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

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Andrew I'd really like to buy a copy of the book when it is done - is it done?
Thanks Too Many Songs,

I appreciate the support. The book is mostly done, but I still don't have a publisher. Incidentally, if anyone on this forum has any connections in the publishing world any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I will definitely let all of you guys on here know about any developments.
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  #27  
Old 12-01-2011, 05:29 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

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Originally Posted by alparrott View Post
Ted Reed taught Chuck Norris how to play drums.
Don't you mean Chuck Norris taught Ted Reed how to play drums...?
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  #28  
Old 08-22-2013, 06:36 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

One thing that you do is play the basic jazz ride pattern, and play the eighth notes of the snare pattern on the snare, and non eighth notes of the snare patternon the bass drum.
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  #29  
Old 08-23-2013, 03:15 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Here are some ideas from a previous post of mine on this thread - and this thread.


Jazz
1. RH – Jazz Ride
RF – Quarter Notes
LF – 2, 4
LH – Melody

2. RH – Jazz Ride
LH – Cross-stick on beat 4
LF – 2, 4
RF – Melody

3. RH – Jazz Ride
LF - 2, 4
LH – Short notes (8th notes)
RF – Long notes (quarter notes or longer)

4. RH – Jazz Ride
LF – 2, 4
RF – Melody
LH – Triplet partials not used in melody

5. RH – Jazz Ride
LF - 2, 4
LH – Melody
RF – Triplet partials not used in melody

6. RH – Jazz Ride
RF, LF – Alternate Melody
LH – Triplet partials not used in melody

7. RH – Jazz Ride
RF – Quarter Notes
LH – Short Notes
LF – Long Notes

8. RH – Jazz Ride
RF – Quarter Notes
LH – Cross-stick on 2, 4
LF – Melody

9. RH, RF – Melody
LF – 2, 4
LH – Triplet partials not used in Melody

10. RH - Jazz Ride
LH - Quarter Note Triplets
LF - 2,4
RF - Melody

11. RH - Jazz Ride
LH - Melody
LF - 2,4
RF - Quarter Note Triplets

Jeff
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  #30  
Old 04-18-2014, 01:13 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

And another interpretation I came up with (don't know if it has been described before on this forum) while working on my independence and linear playing :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mE3sLLBqEME
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  #31  
Old 04-18-2014, 06:30 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Cool stuff, Arnaud-- do you have those interpretations written out, and available on line?
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  #32  
Old 04-18-2014, 08:58 AM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

I used two books for every one of my students. I start with Reed's Syncopation and, when they are ready, I bring Funky Primer into the mix.

I go through Syncopation once as it is written. I then introduce cymbal patterns to each exercise.

Another way to utilize the book is to reverse base and snare (in some exercises.)

It's a tremendous basic book that is open to much exploration.

Rock On,

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  #33  
Old 04-18-2014, 01:23 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Quote:
Cool stuff, Arnaud-- do you have those interpretations written out, and available on line?
No, sorry...everything is in the video.
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  #34  
Old 05-16-2014, 09:22 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

One way that I found to use this book that I'm implementing now has to deal with the Moeller stroke. Specifically, the tap-accent idea.

What I do is, with my ride hand, I play time (straight time), and basically play taps in my snare hand, alternating the time made in the ride hand. Then I play accents with the snare hand, in rhythm to Syncopation itself (starting around p38). After the accent, I tend not to play another tap, since that's not what the current exercise is about.

I've found that this helps me a lot when it comes to playing a lot of DnB stuff, and also a lot of the James Brown grooves.

I see doing this in two ways: with the ride hand playing on closed hi-hats, and then the ride hand playing on the ride cymbal, and also keeping time on the hi-hats via the pedal (can do either on the beat or off the beat).

Last edited by Eyamsiyu; 05-16-2014 at 09:24 PM. Reason: Forgot to add a variation
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  #35  
Old 03-31-2015, 10:33 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

This is still my go-to book for practicing. I use this all the time either as just snare warm-ups, or working on limb independence.

I'll go through an exercise using bass and high hat, then bass and snare, then high hat and snare, then snare and cymbal... and I'll just keep cycling through to use every possible combination of two limbs.

When I was in school, this really helped strengthen my "weaker" limbs, and improved my ability to comp in modern jazz.
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  #36  
Old 04-02-2015, 12:00 AM
AllTheCoolNamesAreTaken AllTheCoolNamesAreTaken is offline
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Something I've learned is that it's also possible to get stuck in a rut just using Syncopation. A lot of other books (Art of Bop, Jazz Drummer's Workshop, etc) define their own Syncopation-like patterns for you to play, and it's worth checking them out for the variety.

Right now I'm using some of the exercises listed in "Baby Steps to Giant Steps", and I was just amazed at how thoroughly they initially threw me off just because my body had memorized large chunks of Syncopation.
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  #37  
Old 01-10-2018, 02:27 PM
Swissward Flamtacles Swissward Flamtacles is offline
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

I remember hearing some years ago that the Exercises 1-8 in Syncopation are based on popular songs of the time of its publication. Now, they are not generally 32 bars long, so I may have this completely wrong but maybe someone else has heard this. I guess, it'd be nice to have those songs playing while working on the exercises. Anybody? :)
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  #38  
Old 01-10-2018, 05:11 PM
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Not sure about the final word. I do use the syncopated readig pages. Quite often just the first one.

I tend to use other sources for the rest of the stuff.
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Old 01-10-2018, 06:57 PM
eddypierce eddypierce is offline
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Swissward Flamtacles View Post
I remember hearing some years ago that the Exercises 1-8 in Syncopation are based on popular songs of the time of its publication. Now, they are not generally 32 bars long, so I may have this completely wrong but maybe someone else has heard this. I guess, it'd be nice to have those songs playing while working on the exercises. Anybody? :)
I've not heard this before, but it is true that many of the exercises in Jim Chapin's 1948 book, Advanced Techniques for the Modern drummer, were based upon popular tunes of the day (Todd Bishop documents them on his excellent blog here: http://www.cruiseshipdrummer.com/201...or-chapin.html).
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Old 01-10-2018, 07:18 PM
toddbishop toddbishop is offline
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Default Re: Ted Reed's Syncopation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Swissward Flamtacles View Post
I remember hearing some years ago that the Exercises 1-8 in Syncopation are based on popular songs of the time of its publication. Now, they are not generally 32 bars long, so I may have this completely wrong but maybe someone else has heard this. I guess, it'd be nice to have those songs playing while working on the exercises. Anybody? :)
I can't imagine. If there's any connection to a song, it's so hidden as to be basically meaningless-- and if you play them along with basically any tune they usually fit surprisingly well anyway. Hearing what works and doesn't work when you do that is a better way to learn than just studying one guy's interpretation of a tune.

If anyone's looking for things to do with Syncopation, I've written a couple/few dozen of them at that link-- there are several pages to scroll through there.
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