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  #1  
Old 02-17-2015, 07:43 PM
Dylan1267 Dylan1267 is offline
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Default Adults Learning Drums

I am a drum instructor/performer in Chicago, and over the years I have noticed a unique set of concerns that pertain to my adult students. Many of them feel like they're too old to start playing and are generally insecure about being a beginner at an instrument. I think this points to a larger issue, which is that we have all been deeply ingrained with the idea that adults are poor learners. In my experience, most adults learn faster than kids because they are more disciplined and focused. Kids may be ideal sponges and have a higher potential for learning, but I find that their lack of focus and discipline often outweighs their innate advantage. Do other adult drummers out there feel the same way about learning the drums (or any instrument)? If so, just remember that you can learn, and will probably be able to play along with songs you like a lot sooner than you think. Not to mention, practicing is enjoyable in itself, and is not merely a means to an end. I've found that once the student starts playing and realizes how and rewarding it is, he/she no longer cares about these stigmas and regrets ever thinking this way. Anyway, this is kind of a ramble, but I just wanted to see if others have felt these same feelings, and more importantly wanted to encourage you to ignore them and start playing!
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:02 PM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

Where are you an instructor in the Chicago area? I'm 56 and am just stating out on the drums (well I played drums in the grade school band for 3 years) I've play bass for 30 years so I'm not new to music, but I have to agree with you.I as an Adults am more patient, less distracted, and have a more organized
routine than I did when I was a kid.
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:20 PM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

I know exactly what you are talking about. I have been playing the drums for a very long time. Always behind the band. I wanted to get out front and make music instead of drumming and supporting the music.
I tried to learn guitar. As soon as I got to the B chord my fingers could not bend in that direction. I got discouraged and quit.
It seemed to me that it would take a long long time to learn guitar. And being an adult I felt I didn't want to wait that long. And practicing was boring.


.
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:42 PM
KamaK KamaK is offline
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

Jim, you have my sympathy on the guitar thing. Understand that "a B chord" is the barred form of A, and that once you are able to play it, you can play any other noted chord value in that form simply by sliding up and down the neck. You're also one finger away from all of the minor versions of the same chord.

Guitar is an instrument with about a half-dozen major hurdles that you hit early on. It really opens up once you cross that threshold.

My feeling is that Drum -> Bass would be a fairly natural transition.
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:45 PM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

I work in education (I run a school for people who want to become professional dog trainers) and one common denominator I find in adult learners is that everyone generally has something they already do well when they begin learning a new skill (whether that be being good at their job, good at their favorite pastime or sport, good musician, artist, photographer etc), so that can sometimes cloud their ability to accept being a complete beginner at something new. Behavior that's reinforced goes up in frequency - that's Thorndike's Law of Effect in action. So if the adult learner doesn't find the new activity reinforcing, then they will be more likely to follow the Matching Law, which states that given the opportunity to engage in two different activities, we will engage in the one that is the most reinforcing (kind of obvious) - so adult learners may be inclined to retreat back to the activities they're already good at if not properly reinforced by the new activity. It depends on the learner too - some folks find repetition and the ability to master something difficult very reinforcing, others will find the immediacy of something reinforcing, like being able to right off the bat play a simple beat along to a song they like etc.
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:51 PM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

I've got direct, live experience with this. I'm 50, and my youngest son is 7. We both started about 3 years ago. He practices about 10 minutes a day. I practice way way more than that. Nevertheless, in some ways, he's more advanced than me. He's been working on groves from the Funky Primer. As he starts working on a new column, he can look at a line, and then play it --- maybe not with great time or quality at first, but playing it. Me, I've got to work through it note by note. On the other hand, I'm farther along with rudiments than he is.
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:53 PM
bsmntdrummer bsmntdrummer is offline
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

It is not just beginners, but people like me who are coming back to drumming after a long absence. As an adult, I am more acutely aware of my own limitations as a player, and I definitely have times where I regret not taking drumming more seriously when I was younger. I'm glad to be playing again in whatever limited capacity I can, but sometimes I feel like I have so much to catch up on that it can be daunting.
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Old 02-17-2015, 10:17 PM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

Re: Adults can be poor learners....it's an individual thing. Some people love learning, others, less so. Some people delight in not being able to do something and must keep trying until they can. Other's have a sense of failure when they can't do something quickly. Maybe some adults go in it thinking "how hard can it be?", and when they actually try their hand at it, maybe don't want to put in the time doing the "drudgery" of beginner basic essential things. Drums are a loooong term thing that can never be "beaten". You really need to accept that going in, no matter what age.

It's really all up to the adult if they are willing to forego instant gratification for long term skills. Music is a sort of mental fountain of youth. That's enough reason to indulge in it right there. It keeps your brain popping like it should. It's easy for me to hear stuff in my head that I can't pull off. It's fun and rewarding to me trying to get that stuff out and translate it to my limbs somehow. I don't need anyone else to challenge me, I have way more challenge than I am even capable of with a small set of drums. But I have that luxury as I don't rely on my musical skills to live on.

It's all up to the individual.
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Old 02-17-2015, 10:19 PM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

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Originally Posted by geezer View Post
everyone generally has something they already do well when they begin learning a new skill (whether that be being good at their job, good at their favorite pastime or sport, good musician, artist, photographer etc), so that can sometimes cloud their ability to accept being a complete beginner at something new.
^^^ This. Teachers should never underestimate the amount of trust placed in them by adult learners, who put themselves in a position of vulnerability. It's my belief that every so often, all teachers should have a few lessons in something they have no experience of (and possibly little aptitude for), so that they never forget how it feels!

Nothing, however, breeds confidence like confidence. IME (a teacher in a former life), people don't need to be told that they're good - they can generally work that out themselves, and it's too relative a term to be useful - but they DO need to be reassured that they are capable of doing it. If your teacher believes in you, you're far more likely to believe in yourself.
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Old 02-17-2015, 10:45 PM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

Pretty timely post for me... I will try to touch on a few of your points.

I'm just beginning to explore learning how to play clarinet - which by every and any measure is about removed from drums as possible (which I've been doing for 38 years).

Heck, I haven't even had my first lesson yet as the instrument I have is being worked on, but I've been watching as many videos on getting started as I can squeeze into my day. And... I haven't made it much pass how to assemble and care for the instrument!! I've become completely overwhelmed at the starting a new instrument phase.

I know my private teacher will work me through all of this but I can't tell you how many times I've said out loud how we take for granted our knowledge on the instrument after having done it for so long.

Just two weeks ago I felt beyond confident drilling tom mounts on 3 bass drums (which came out fabulous) and yet at the same time, I don't feel remotely comfortable assembling a simple clarinet.

As an adult student - I'm a sponge. I love to learn - bring it on. Leveraging my experience with drums, I know full well the trials and tribulations of all of this. I know the value and importance of practice and more importantly - how to do so.
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Old 02-18-2015, 06:52 AM
COE_drummer COE_drummer is offline
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

I started playing when I was sixteen lol (I'm 32 now) . . . I cannot really relate to this post personally, but I do lessons and have a few adult students. The common thing they tell themselves is that they feel they are "too old" to start something like this, which is nonsense. It doesn't matter what age you are, if you have a good instructor and he can teach each individual in a way that makes it stick, you are never too old. I do find that the adult students need more "personalized" approaches than the younger ones. Younger ones I can teach all the same way. The adults are a little more challenging for me because every single one I have spoken to was apprehensive about even walking through the door. There's a shell to break there and it can be kind of a challenge sometimes.
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Old 02-18-2015, 07:38 AM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

What is this "adult" thing of which you all speak?
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Old 02-18-2015, 08:29 AM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

Maybe another discussion but I once heard part of a conversation between 2 men, around 45 or so. The one was just learning to play drums, the other asked whatever strange delusion would make a grownup man want to hit a set of drums with pieces of wood in his free time.

It probably was said in a joking way but I can imagine the new drummer might be asking himself the question when he is having a bad day.
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Old 02-18-2015, 08:52 AM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

When people bandy around this phrase "adult learner" I'm often puzzled by the fact that these 'adults' are so often influenced by external forces about what they're doing. If a friend should ask why you want to do this or that at your age, and they give up because of it, that tells me that you're not really an adult because you're being influenced by other people who probably don't have their s*%t together, either.

So when adults come to me, I'm interested in seeing where they mentally are. They shouldn't be phased by anyone questioning what they want to do, because only kids have a problem with peer pressure, don't they? I'm encouraging and love it when I meet people who are picking up an instrument for the first time, but they should be focused on what they want to do with it, not succumbing to people who may question why they're doing it. I would feel guilty taking your money for lessons if you're really just coming to me for encouragement to continue, so the mental condition is paramount.
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Old 02-18-2015, 12:58 PM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

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They shouldn't be phased by anyone questioning what they want to do, because only kids have a problem with peer pressure, don't they?
No. If that were the case, there would be no such thing as bullying in the workplace, for example. Besides, you're not taking into account the fact that a great many adults question themselves, which is a mature thing to do in day-to-day life but can also have a negative impact on them.

Quote:
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I would feel guilty taking your money for lessons if you're really just coming to me for encouragement to continue, so the mental condition is paramount.
Don't you feel that part of your role as a teacher is to engender a positive mental condition in order to enable learning to occur? It's immensely satisfying when you see a student blossom BECAUSE OF YOU, and become a different, more confident person. And then they're much, much easier to teach and they learn far more quickly.
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Old 02-18-2015, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by eric_B View Post
Maybe another discussion but I once heard part of a conversation between 2 men, around 45 or so. The one was just learning to play drums, the other asked whatever strange delusion would make a grownup man want to hit a set of drums with pieces of wood in his free time.

It probably was said in a joking way but I can imagine the new drummer might be asking himself the question when he is having a bad day.
The asker of the question would have received a two word answer from me.

The second word would have been "off".
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Old 02-18-2015, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Hollywood Jim View Post
I know exactly what you are talking about. I have been playing the drums for a very long time. Always behind the band. I wanted to get out front and make music instead of drumming and supporting the music.
I tried to learn guitar. As soon as I got to the B chord my fingers could not bend in that direction. I got discouraged and quit.
It seemed to me that it would take a long long time to learn guitar. And being an adult I felt I didn't want to wait that long. And practicing was boring.


.
Hi Jim. Its a tough hurdle to get over. The best way to learn a new instrument, at almost any age I think, Is to pick a song you love and would also love to play. Get the chords and sequence from the music or off the web and learn to play that one song.

That way you are not learning to play the guitar you are learning to play music, and a song you love. Its easier to stay motivated if you can hear the progress as you work through the song.

A lot of people get discouraged, especialy when its an instrument new to them and they think "I have all these hundreds of chords to learn before I will be any good." Thats probably true but If you learn one song, that means a lot to you, those same few chords can be used to play dozens of songs, so you are learning what you need.

Then pick another song you like, with different chords, and you then have another few dozen songs you can cover using those same chords. This method just takes away the overwhelming burden we sometimes feel when confronted with all that is involved in a new instrument.

Just use the tools you need to do the job at the time. When you need more complex tools you can then aquire them by the same method. Its the same for all instruments.

Last edited by mikel; 02-18-2015 at 04:07 PM.
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Old 02-18-2015, 06:17 PM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

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Originally Posted by mikel View Post
Hi Jim. Its a tough hurdle to get over. The best way to learn a new instrument, at almost any age I think, Is to pick a song you love and would also love to play.
Just use the tools you need to do the job at the time. When you need more complex tools you can then aquire them by the same method. Its the same for all instruments.
Great idea. Thank you !

Come to think of it this is how we learned to play when we were young kids in our garage bands.


.
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Old 02-18-2015, 06:49 PM
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Great idea. Thank you !

Come to think of it this is how we learned to play when we were young kids in our garage bands.


.
Aye mate,spot on. Its also the method I used to teach my daughter to play guitar. From one song, a couple of years ago, she now plays in a folk band.
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Old 02-18-2015, 07:23 PM
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We are all life-long learners. i learned that from my "extended stint" in college-started in 1973 and finished in 1992. What I "learned" is I have to "master" a subject or task and I can do so on my own with motivation and effort but it sure helps to get assistance from the experts. I didn't count two postdocs-add 4 more years dang.So I may be an idiot, but I'm an educated idiot. LOL.
Motivation, discipline, and persistence is what it takes. From what I've seen the masters are really disciplined practicing daily to master their instrument, and musicians have to be motivated and persistent to ever make a career of it.
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Old 02-18-2015, 08:21 PM
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One thing is for sure; if it weren't for compulsory education, there would be a hell of a lot more of, and "better" drummers. Kids age 7-10 max in learning potential and speed, in general.

I will disagree, in that a child with the necessary time, desire and focus, will learn a hell of a lot faster than an adult.
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Old 02-18-2015, 08:28 PM
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I've got direct, live experience with this. I'm 50, and my youngest son is 7. We both started about 3 years ago. He practices about 10 minutes a day. I practice way way more than that. Nevertheless, in some ways, he's more advanced than me. He's been working on groves from the Funky Primer. As he starts working on a new column, he can look at a line, and then play it --- maybe not with great time or quality at first, but playing it. Me, I've got to work through it note by note. On the other hand, I'm farther along with rudiments than he is.
That is a really interesting take and read. How often do you practice, and do you practice the same things?
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Old 02-18-2015, 08:45 PM
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One thing is for sure; if it weren't for compulsory education, there would be a hell of a lot more of, and "better" drummers. Kids age 7-10 max in learning potential and speed, in general.

I will disagree, in that a child with the necessary time, desire and focus, will learn a hell of a lot faster than an adult.
Sure but you'd also have a generation of functionally illiterate adults twenty years later. I work with a lot of functionally illiterate people and it's no picnic for them.
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Old 02-18-2015, 09:33 PM
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What is this "adult" thing of which you all speak?
Not sure, but when you find out, give me a heads up, OK?

James, what is that crab looking thing at the bottom of your posts, and what does it mean?
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Old 02-18-2015, 09:53 PM
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Nothing, however, breeds confidence like confidence. IME (a teacher in a former life), people don't need to be told that they're good - they can generally work that out themselves, and it's too relative a term to be useful - but they DO need to be reassured that they are capable of doing it. If your teacher believes in you, you're far more likely to believe in yourself.
So true, I had teachers who trusted in me and I made a lot of improvement.

However I also had teacher who lost all belief in me once I hit the first major wall. Too bad it was a teacher in a music school. I got depressed and decided to quit the school, few months later I even considered quitting drums! Fortunately I didn't as I am very determined person and managed to get over it.

NOTE: I started playing when I was 16 years old, it isn't adulthood, but it's already considered a late start. I also never done anything with music before.
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Old 02-18-2015, 11:45 PM
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Not sure, but when you find out, give me a heads up, OK?

James, what is that crab looking thing at the bottom of your posts, and what does it mean?
The crab looking thing, as you blasphemously refer to it is a line drawing of the Flying Spaghetti Monster.

As a heretic, I hereby order you to get stoned. Not with stones, you understand...the other, altogether more pleasant way.

Go pastafarianism! Ramen!
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Old 02-19-2015, 01:41 AM
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People who say adults can't learn, probably weren't all that great at learning new things in the first place, the only reason they have any skills at all, is they are willing to sit in a room by them selves and play the same things over and over again, instead of going out and experiencing different things.

It never ceases to amaze me how you can give even simple, but novel instrument, to some musicians(pianists or singers), and they won't even figure out how to make a sound with it.
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Old 02-19-2015, 03:05 AM
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The crab looking thing, as you blasphemously refer to it is a line drawing of the Flying Spaghetti Monster.

As a heretic, I hereby order you to get stoned. Not with stones, you understand...the other, altogether more pleasant way.

Go pastafarianism! Ramen!
Flying spaghetti Monster? He's got more feet than wings. I'd have to be stoned to imagine that thing flying. But I accept your penance and will tend to it forthcomingly. And I apologize to the court for the blasphemery.
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Old 02-19-2015, 03:38 AM
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Those aren't feet, apostate!

Those are His Noodly Appendages.

You need to understand that when drawing a deity, no representation can attempt to capture the Sublime Awesomeness (tm).

And kids, don't even THINK of drawing pictures of the prophet Muhammad (PBUH) at home. Just don't!
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Old 02-19-2015, 03:41 AM
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I "played" drums for a few years when I was 15. Hated lessons. Hated Stick Control. HATED the practice pad. Just wanted to sit behind a drum kit and play. Didn't understand the need for fundamentals. Got into other stuff and that was that. A couple of years ago I picked up an e-kit since it was quiet and sounded good and was fairly cheap. Now I am fully into it. On my third acoustic kit and love to practice. I love the practice pad and love practising, especially rudiments and good old stick control. I am 50 now and totally know that you have to work at the fundamentals and practice endlessly to improve. I just didn't have the wisdom or life experience at 15 to understand this. I am now kicking myself for not keeping at it- I'd have 35 years behind the kit now and would'nt suck as much as I do. But, the journey is half the fun
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Old 02-19-2015, 06:03 PM
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I "played" drums for a few years when I was 15. Hated lessons. Hated Stick Control. HATED the practice pad. Just wanted to sit behind a drum kit and play. Didn't understand the need for fundamentals. Got into other stuff and that was that. A couple of years ago I picked up an e-kit since it was quiet and sounded good and was fairly cheap. Now I am fully into it. On my third acoustic kit and love to practice. I love the practice pad and love practising, especially rudiments and good old stick control. I am 50 now and totally know that you have to work at the fundamentals and practice endlessly to improve. I just didn't have the wisdom or life experience at 15 to understand this. I am now kicking myself for not keeping at it- I'd have 35 years behind the kit now and would'nt suck as much as I do. But, the journey is half the fun
Dont kick yourself, If you had stayed with it, at the time, you may have got bored or found you were not going to be the next big thing and chucked it forever.

Now? You have discovered a love of drumming and a new focus. Live in the moment and enjoy it for what it is.
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Old 02-19-2015, 06:23 PM
GetAgrippa GetAgrippa is online now
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Well you have to want to be an "adult" learner. I started at 10 in the mid 60's so rode the garage band era of self taught 'musicians' then quit from about 76-86, then got a cheap Pearl forum kit and played "at" it again-just playing along with music. It wasn't till I joined an orchestra and played with this jazz group and started learning from Drummerworld the last ten years that I really started to want to be a drummer. I want to be able to site read and play-I struggle with that now seems thinking about it is distracting. I hadn't practiced rudiments in decades and never learned but the basics then. A bass player friend has really helped me improve but i feel i really need an instructor to help me really improve.
I fear my old bad habits may be hard to break and hope to find a teacher to help me with the assets and deficits I have. I have an older horn player friend =he worked for the Secret Service protecting 4-5 US President-he also trained agents firearms. He noted that many males with previous gun experience were difficult to retrain properly=he said the males and females with no gun experience were the better marksman/markswomen. I kind of worry about that as a liability?
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Old 02-19-2015, 08:47 PM
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

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Originally Posted by mikel View Post
Dont kick yourself, If you had stayed with it, at the time, you may have got bored or found you were not going to be the next big thing and chucked it forever.

Now? You have discovered a love of drumming and a new focus. Live in the moment and enjoy it for what it is.
Well, I did trade my drums to a guy for a photo enlarger and I am now a professional photographer so there you go. :)
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  #34  
Old 02-20-2015, 04:36 AM
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vitaflo vitaflo is offline
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

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Originally Posted by Dylan1267 View Post
I think this points to a larger issue, which is that we have all been deeply ingrained with the idea that adults are poor learners. In my experience, most adults learn faster than kids because they are more disciplined and focused. Kids may be ideal sponges and have a higher potential for learning, but I find that their lack of focus and discipline often outweighs their innate advantage.
I disagree that adults think they are poor learners. They've obviously learned other things and spent a lot of time to learn those things. Which is where I think the real issue lies. Time commitment. Adults are acutely aware of the real time it takes to become a master at something, and the older you get, the less time you want to "waste".

Kids may lack lacking discipline and focus, but what they have that adults do not is play. And I don't mean playing the instrument. I mean kids simply do things because they enjoy them, they don't dissect how much effort it is, or what the ultimate goals are or what it "means" to their life. That simple difference removes many psychological barriers that adults in comparison tend to put up for themselves.

Unfortunately when we get older we are taught to be more "serious" and shun play. "Play is what children do" we say. But we rob ourselves of the curiosities and joy of life when we do such things.
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Old 02-20-2015, 06:30 AM
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Brian Brian is offline
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

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Originally Posted by BacteriumFendYoke View Post
Sure but you'd also have a generation of functionally illiterate adults twenty years later. I work with a lot of functionally illiterate people and it's no picnic for them.
I didn't say no education with curbing the compulsory schooling.. ;)

The majority of great drummers spent their childhood focused on drumming and not mastering the art of test-taking.
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  #36  
Old 02-20-2015, 06:42 AM
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GRUNTERSDAD GRUNTERSDAD is offline
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

Before you can teach anyone anything you have to gain their trust. I have taught swimming lessons from the diaper dip age to adult. NO one is going to drown playing the drums, but in a pool the first thing is comfort and trust. Adults have had many years to build up fears and phobias and self doubt and you have to break that first. The first couple for lessons were just standing in the shallow end talking and getting to know each other. I can see this in drumming as well. Questions about why they want to learn, what they expect to do when they have learned etc. I don't think I would even give them a set of sticks unless they were really eager. If this is the case then you first hurdle has been navigated. Trust and comfort first, then actual teaching and lessons.
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  #37  
Old 02-20-2015, 12:47 PM
mikel mikel is offline
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

In essence, you cant teach people, especialy adults, thay have to "want" to learn.

I was an athletics coach for 15 years, hurdles and high jump, two technical events. As I watched some of the realy talented athletes It was my privelage to work with I often thought "That 1% difference in there performance, I might have made, was worth all my free time, I hope they feel it was worth all there hard work".

In my experience its down to the learner. The teacher/coach might be the best at what they do but If the pupil is not, talented, motivated, driven, and above all excited by the activity then even the best cant force them to learn.

I was always thought of as an inspirational coach, yea right, but no mater how talented the athlete If they cant be a***d and just want to go through the motions then all your effort and encouragement is wasted.

Motivated and talented people have what it takes in them, the teacher might make a 1% difference.
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  #38  
Old 02-23-2015, 04:51 AM
Raqh Raqh is offline
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

I just started playing drums at age 43. I wanted to learn for a long time, but for whatever reason my parents drilled it into our heads that no one in our family would be good at music or art. I took that on face value for way to long.

When I finally decided I was just going to go for it I was pretty nervous as I approached THE go to drum shop/studio in our area. I was intimidated when I walked through the door.

The best thing that could have happened, did.

The skinny rocker dude behind the counter looked at me and asked "What can I do for you?" He smiled and was genuine. I said I was there for a lesson. He asked what teacher I was with and then proceeded to be extremely welcoming and encouraging. He told me how much fun I was going to have, how my teacher was one who really believed in rudimental drumming, etc.

That introduction to the world of drummers made me fall in love with the drumming community. Everytime I go in with a question or need a part for my "Craigslist special" kit the guys there never make me feel stupid or less of a drummer because I'm new. When I bought a used snare drum stand for my practice pad they took the time to show me how to adjust it. Even though it wasn't too hard to figure out, it made me feel really comfortable.

No one would ever look at me and guess that I play drums. I would not blend into the crowd at a drum clinic. More likely someone would think I was looking for my kid to pick up. So I did worry a lot about how uncomfortable it would be as an older, middle aged woman walking into the drum shop. I'm super grateful that no one there, customer or employee or instructor, has ever made me feel weird. Now it's one of my favorite places to go.
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  #39  
Old 02-23-2015, 11:37 AM
mikel mikel is offline
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raqh View Post
I just started playing drums at age 43. I wanted to learn for a long time, but for whatever reason my parents drilled it into our heads that no one in our family would be good at music or art. I took that on face value for way to long.

When I finally decided I was just going to go for it I was pretty nervous as I approached THE go to drum shop/studio in our area. I was intimidated when I walked through the door.

The best thing that could have happened, did.

The skinny rocker dude behind the counter looked at me and asked "What can I do for you?" He smiled and was genuine. I said I was there for a lesson. He asked what teacher I was with and then proceeded to be extremely welcoming and encouraging. He told me how much fun I was going to have, how my teacher was one who really believed in rudimental drumming, etc.

That introduction to the world of drummers made me fall in love with the drumming community. Everytime I go in with a question or need a part for my "Craigslist special" kit the guys there never make me feel stupid or less of a drummer because I'm new. When I bought a used snare drum stand for my practice pad they took the time to show me how to adjust it. Even though it wasn't too hard to figure out, it made me feel really comfortable.

No one would ever look at me and guess that I play drums. I would not blend into the crowd at a drum clinic. More likely someone would think I was looking for my kid to pick up. So I did worry a lot about how uncomfortable it would be as an older, middle aged woman walking into the drum shop. I'm super grateful that no one there, customer or employee or instructor, has ever made me feel weird. Now it's one of my favorite places to go.
Thats a great story and a lesson in itself. Do things in your own time, at your own speed, in your own way, and you will be comfortable and get more enjoyment out of it.

Learning to play the drums is a personal choice, If any aspect makes you realy uncomfortable then find another route to the same goal.

Personaly I have an aversion fo formal teaching, always have, it goes back to my school days, I probably have low level ADD. I much prefer to work things out for myself when it comes to drumming. Thats probably why I am not great but I am comfortable doing it this way and I enjoy my drumming hugely.

Good luck and keep playing, fellow drummer.
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  #40  
Old 02-26-2015, 10:33 PM
shinysun shinysun is offline
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Default Re: Adults Learning Drums

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Originally Posted by Raqh View Post
I just started playing drums at age 43.
Well I thought I had left it late at 35! I was very nervous, I went along for a taster lesson and liked it. That was in Sept last year, I have not yet had any more lessons but in October I got a crappy old Premier Cabria, have messed up the tuning by trying to follow you-tube videos :) , failed to find much time to practice , but even so have gotten the neighbour (who is somewhat deranged anyway) to complain to the council about the noise nuisance!

That was only last week and I'm in a funk that I might have to give up before I've even begun. At least there are stories on here to cheer me up :)
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