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Old 01-05-2018, 11:27 PM
camondrums camondrums is offline
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Default Micro Timing

When it comes to being a drummer, we need to be able to play tightly in time. In this video iíll show you an exercise to help strengthen your micro timing.

A lot of drummers do not understand what it is to play IN TIME. Really fast drum passages over a long period of time tend to get sloppy and are very exhausting. Working on, and understanding micro time, will help with inconsistent drumming. Micro timing refers to the consistent distance between your subdivisions. What I mean by this, is that all of your notes (no matter the subdivision) are all the same volume and distance apart. If youíre playing 16th notes ( 1 e + a ), they are to be played that way and not before or after the beat.

Tighten up your drumming with this simple exercise:

https://youtu.be/tbjZxd4Uzyo
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Old 01-23-2018, 11:28 PM
SmoothOperator SmoothOperator is offline
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Default Re: Micro Timing

That's it the way I think of micro-timing at all. I think of micro-timing as expression. By moving around my subdivisions, I can get different feels from the same basic grooves.
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Old 01-31-2018, 06:46 PM
camondrums camondrums is offline
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Default Re: Micro Timing

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Originally Posted by SmoothOperator View Post
That's it the way I think of micro-timing at all. I think of micro-timing as expression. By moving around my subdivisions, I can get different feels from the same basic grooves.
Like most drumming ideas they are interpretative. Also, sure you can move your subdivisions around to get different feels, but having the ability to play them tightly in time is much more important. Especially if you're dealing with several different subdivisions. If you're gonna make it complicated, play it tight.
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Old 01-31-2018, 08:04 PM
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Dr_Watso Dr_Watso is offline
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Default Re: Micro Timing

I think not rushing or dragging 16ths is just regular timing.

Micro timing is typically thought of in my circles as the stuff that's difficult to measure with standard sub-division values. Like the difference between playing one side or the other of a specific 16th note rather than just playing the 16ths without wavering.
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Old 01-31-2018, 11:07 PM
camondrums camondrums is offline
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Default Re: Micro Timing

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Originally Posted by Dr_Watso View Post
I think not rushing or dragging 16ths is just regular timing.

Micro timing is typically thought of in my circles as the stuff that's difficult to measure with standard sub-division values. Like the difference between playing one side or the other of a specific 16th note rather than just playing the 16ths without wavering.
Totally agree, which is also why practicing to a metronome should be standard.
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Old 03-18-2018, 05:36 AM
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Dibalo Jonze Dibalo Jonze is offline
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Default Re: Micro Timing

Nice video!

I try to think of three types of "Time":

1)
Microtiming: Like the O.P. describes microtiming refers to the the consistency of note placement. This requires feeling the subdivisions and like others are saying leads to playing ahead or behind the beat, and what I would call in the pocket. Like O.P. said, the timing AND DYNAMICS must be consistent.

2)
Tempo: Just like it sounds. This refers to starting a song at 96 bpm and five minutes later, still be at 96 bpm.

3)
Macrotiming: This is feeling larger phrases. Most importantly always knowing where the one is and each quarter note in 4/4. Beyond that it includes two general aspects. One is the ability to play odd time signatures. The other is the ability to play over the bar, flip the beat upside down, use interesting phrases and polyrhythms, etc., even while in 4/4.

--

It is possible for a drummer to have only any one or two of these types of timing down, and the ultimate goal is obviously all three. The most important to me is microtiming. If a player uses consistent note placement and makes the beats throughout the different sections of the song feel good, then it's not the end of the world if the song start at 96 bpm and gradually moves towards 101 by the end at. I can dance to that.

On the other hand, a drummer could possess only Tempo, and at the end of the song still be perfectly matched up with a silent metronome in the background. But throughout the song, the subdivisions and backbeats were maybe less consistent and there wasn't a good feeling established. Probably not going to dance.

A drummer could also rush the tempo throughout a song, and have inconsistent micro-timing, but is able to play complex time sigs and progressive rock type stuff. Might break my back if I try to dance here.

• Any good drummer must develop and possess the first two. Developing these concepts should be chief among one's drumming goals.

• For the music that I imagine most of us like, one better have a good grasp on the third as well.

Last edited by Dibalo Jonze; 03-18-2018 at 06:56 PM.
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