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Old 11-02-2017, 02:39 AM
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Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
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Default What is the name of this specific fill/pattern?

I can't remember, but I'm fairly sure this pattern has a name (might be a rudiment).

Larnell Lewis uses it here in this vid at 2:58

https://youtu.be/5N7guAESkbw?t=2m56s


Love the sound of this so much, have heard Benny Greb use it, I just cannot for the life of me remember the name

Thanks
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Old 11-02-2017, 03:05 AM
williamsbclontz williamsbclontz is offline
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Default Re: What is the name of this specific fill/pattern?

Oh man I remember a few years ago I was teaching a kid and he asked me about that specific type of fill. It's a rudiment of some sort and I think it's got a crazy name, I'll have to do some research, if all else fails I can write it out. I love using that fill
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Old 11-02-2017, 04:19 AM
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Old 11-02-2017, 01:48 PM
Brian Brian is offline
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Default Re: What is the name of this specific fill/pattern?

you mean the "blushda"? that's like an inverted swiss army triplet, with one extra note - rL r l becomes rL rr l. there's quite a few youtube videos explaining how to, and where to go with it. It's one of those things that you want to learn, but get away from it too, learn to orchestrate it differently, placing in a different area of the phrase , be original..otherwise it becomes kind of cliche because so many players use/have used it.
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Old 11-02-2017, 06:09 PM
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Merlin5 Merlin5 is offline
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Default Re: What is the name of this specific fill/pattern?

It's the Blushda. It's actually an elaboration on the 'Flam Accent' rather than the 'Swiss Army Triplet'.

(rl) or (lr) = a flam

Swiss Army Triplet is either (rl) L R, (rl) L R, etc or (lr) R L, (lr) R L, etc

The Flam accent is flam (rl) R L, (lr) L R.

Taking the part of the Flam Accent that is (rl) R L, the Blushda doubles up on the R so you get (rl) RR L. To play it on the kit, there's several ways to orchestrate it but most commonly, flam '(rl)' between tom and snare starting on the tom, and the 'RR L' all on the snare.
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Old 11-02-2017, 06:17 PM
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opentune opentune is online now
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Default Re: What is the name of this specific fill/pattern?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian View Post
you mean the "blushda"? ......be original..otherwise it becomes kind of cliche because so many players use/have used it.
A 'cliche'? Do you know of a vid that show maybe a better or more common example of the blushda than this one?
I've learned this rudiment for awhile but actually find it rather difficult to apply in many situations around the kit. To my ears it interrupts flow, but thats likely my inability to perfect it.
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Old 11-02-2017, 07:56 PM
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Default Re: What is the name of this specific fill/pattern?

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Originally Posted by Merlin5 View Post
It's the Blushda. It's actually an elaboration on the 'Flam Accent' rather than the 'Swiss Army Triplet'.

(rl) or (lr) = a flam

Swiss Army Triplet is either (rl) L R, (rl) L R, etc or (lr) R L, (lr) R L, etc

The Flam accent is flam (rl) R L, (lr) L R.

Taking the part of the Flam Accent that is (rl) R L, the Blushda doubles up on the R so you get (rl) RR L. To play it on the kit, there's several ways to orchestrate it but most commonly, flam '(rl)' between tom and snare starting on the tom, and the 'RR L' all on the snare.
Yes that's it thankyou very much!
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Old 11-02-2017, 08:54 PM
mpungercar mpungercar is offline
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Default Re: What is the name of this specific fill/pattern?

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Originally Posted by opentune View Post
A 'cliche'? Do you know of a vid that show maybe a better or more common example of the blushda than this one?
I've learned this rudiment for awhile but actually find it rather difficult to apply in many situations around the kit. To my ears it interrupts flow, but thats likely my inability to perfect it.
Todd Sucherman does a great job of explaining the lick - click here
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Old 11-02-2017, 09:50 PM
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Default Re: What is the name of this specific fill/pattern?

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Originally Posted by mpungercar View Post
Todd Sucherman does a great job of explaining the lick - click here
thanks, man, much better. I see I have not been executing it properly, lol.
Boy Todd has his snare high above the waste.
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Old 11-02-2017, 10:25 PM
Brian Brian is offline
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Default Re: What is the name of this specific fill/pattern?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Merlin5 View Post
It's the Blushda. It's actually an elaboration on the 'Flam Accent' rather than the 'Swiss Army Triplet'.

(rl) or (lr) = a flam

Swiss Army Triplet is either (rl) L R, (rl) L R, etc or (lr) R L, (lr) R L, etc

The Flam accent is flam (rl) R L, (lr) L R.

Taking the part of the Flam Accent that is (rl) R L, the Blushda doubles up on the R so you get (rl) RR L. To play it on the kit, there's several ways to orchestrate it but most commonly, flam '(rl)' between tom and snare starting on the tom, and the 'RR L' all on the snare.
isn't the swiss army triplet just an inverted flam accent? I think that's what I meant but 5am posting and lack of coffee usually wins. Could be wrong.

Either way I've been out of the loop concerning rudiment schooling for a while, should probably brush up again.

I can say that the "blushda" isn't a schooled rudiment, it's a sticking.

I know that Steve Holmes has a good video from a while back, here. You really want to do things like break up the hands around the drums, add a bass drum to lead it off (or even two 32nd note triplets), and things like that. I also like to mix in other rudiments like 6 stroke rolls, or hand-foot combinations between blushdas, etc. etc. to really spice it up, that's sort of where I took it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6U5okNdGiY
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Old 11-02-2017, 10:35 PM
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Merlin5 Merlin5 is offline
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Default Re: What is the name of this specific fill/pattern?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian View Post
isn't the swiss army triplet just an inverted flam accent? I think that's what I meant but 5am posting and lack of coffee usually wins. Could be wrong.

Either way I've been out of the loop concerning rudiment schooling for a while, should probably brush up again.

I can say that the "blushda" isn't a schooled rudiment, it's a sticking.

I know that Steve Holmes has a good video from a while back, here. You really want to do things like break up the hands around the drums, add a bass drum to lead it off (or even two 32nd note triplets), and things like that. I also like to mix in other rudiments like 6 stroke rolls, or hand-foot combinations between blushdas, etc. etc. to really spice it up, that's sort of where I took it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6U5okNdGiY
Yeah, Steve Holmes was pretty much the first, if not the first, to teach the Blushda. Even he describes it as based on a Swiss Triplet. But not wanting to sound pedantic, while you're correct that it's an inverted Swiss Army Triplet, an inverted Swiss Army Triplet is actually a Flam Accent.
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  #11  
Old 11-02-2017, 11:19 PM
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Default Re: What is the name of this specific fill/pattern?

Itís a fine lick, Iím just always afraid Iíll lose the groove or fail to communicate the overall musical line when doing something fast and intricate like this around the kit. Maybe if itís just on the snare, those dangers arenít there, but...it takes a LOT of repetition to really perfect fills like these, and thatís not what youíre getting paid for anyway.
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