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  #1  
Old 08-22-2017, 12:36 AM
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Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
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Default Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

I'm not sure if this is right place to post this, but this forum is so great and I can't think of any other place where I could get genuine advice from knowledgeable people on this topic.

I live in UK and i'm currently at uni, but frankly I hate it. I don't enjoy any of it, but most importantly I don't really like the degree itself.

It's cliche, but I don't want to spend my life in a job I hate. I don't see the point. The thing that I enjoy most in life is drumming.


I just want some insight from people who are more involved in this scene. How viable is it to make money? I accept I may never be rich, and I'd be willing to sacrifice money for doing something I enjoy.

If anyone would suggest I go for it, where do I start? Are general music colleges (contemporary ones like ACM here in UK) worth it - it seems they aren't great for drums?

Is it just gigs, session drumming and teaching mainly? How do I get started?

I just think I'm 19 - i have no obligations, responsibilities (kids, mortgage) why shouldn't I?

Thanks all
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Old 08-22-2017, 01:09 AM
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larryace larryace is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

One of the worst times in the last 100 years to try and earn a living from music.

You need to have a money making machine these days.
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Old 08-22-2017, 01:19 AM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

If you hate your course, change your course.

Nobody has ever complained that they studied too much.

It might be different if you wanted to drop uni to pursue a "once in a lifetime" opportunity, but you want to drop uni 'cause you aren't enjoying it, and you think you'd be happier playing drums full time.

A university education is a great thing. It will teach you the importance of self motivation, critical thought, objective analysis and plenty more besides. Even if you end up doing things that have nothing to do with your field of study, a university education will stand you in great stead. I studied economics, spent a large chunk of my career implementing IT systems in corporates and now I sell car parts for a living.

Identify a career that will earn you a decent salary, and that you can enjoy, and pursue it, starting with a suitable course of study. Speak to career and course advisers, but realise that they may know less than you about what's out there. Sound them out anyway, but feel free to discard what they say.

Keep drumming as a safety valve and a stress release. If a music career opens up for you, that's great. If it doesn't, music remains the most fun you can have with your pants on.
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Old 08-22-2017, 01:23 AM
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Red Menace Red Menace is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

I'd recommend finding something that you don't completely hate and could make a decent living in then major in that. I can be done, to make a living off of music but it is a lot of luck in addition to skill.

Keep at your studies, get a good job and take lessons from good teachers. Build your skills as a drummer and play around with many different types of bands. If you come across some style of aspect of being a working drummer that gives you trouble then take it to your teacher and work on it till it's flawless. If you find a gig that pays all your bills then great! If not, then you'll have the skills you need to supplement you income drumming.

I have a full time job that pays the bills and the money I make drumming pays for my toys.
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  #5  
Old 08-22-2017, 01:26 AM
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bermuda bermuda is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

Nobody wants to spend their life hating their job... any job. There are plenty of musicians who'd rather be playing something other than whatever they're doing, even though they're making a living. So please don't get stuck with the idea that playing drums full-time will necessarily bring you happiness.

There are advantages to being young and having few responsibilities. I think that's the time you invest in yourself in school. If you don't like what you're learning and just can't see yourself in that career, then take another path. Someday, you'll be glad you did.

You can keep drumming and growing as a player while you're in school. School and employment and music aren't mutually exclusive. You're probably not going to take the music world by storm at your age anyway, so it's okay to set a 3 or 4 year plan to pursue music more seriously, after you have a path to make money and pay for gear, a new car, and a nice flat and the expenses that go with it.

I appreciate your ideals, but don't assume you're going to hate anything that's not music. And you'll be able to both to an extent. How cool would it be to have your regular paycheck on a job that you enjoy, and play drums nights & weekends for fun and extra cash!? Best of both worlds.

It's not easy to make a living just playing. I had a few day jobs for many years before I finally walked away, and I'm glad I didn't have to struggle or incur a lot of debt by just playing drums at the time.

Starving for one's art is highly overrated. Be smart.

Bermuda
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Old 08-22-2017, 01:27 AM
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Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryace View Post
One of the worst times in the last 100 years to try and earn a living from music.
Any reason for this in particular? Haven't people always said things like this? haha
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  #7  
Old 08-22-2017, 01:30 AM
DrumWild DrumWild is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

Step 1: Marry well.

I left university 32 years ago to pursue music. It didn't really work out. What ended up happening was that I made a division in my head between what I do for money and what I do for happiness.

So when I need money, I work.

When I need happiness, I turn to music.

To me, happiness at work is about as unrealistic as a stable living in music. That's not to say that you can't do it. I do think the odds are stacked against artists, especially today, when we're a few generations deep into a culture that believes that music should be free. That's another discussion in a highly-heated thread nearby.

As an old fart, I can tell you that the trick to life is to NEVER stop learning. Right now, I'm learning some things that hopefully will land me a new career. At the same time, I'm taking guitar lessons and learning Music Theory.

Gotta take care of the work and money. Gotta take care of the music and happiness. Your mileage may vary. Beyond the advice to never stop learning, you may write off the rest of what I've said as anecdotal evidence that means nothing. Best of luck.

EDIT: One more thing... while I did leave university and pursue my dream, and fail miserably, a few important things happened. One was that I had a TON of fun making music. That was then. Now, I have absolutely NO old man regrets at all. No wondering "what if" or what could have been.
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  #8  
Old 08-22-2017, 01:33 AM
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Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

Thanks everyone, I just have to do some thinking. Will most likely finish degree and see from there, or possibly take a gap year now and reconsider

But I'm wondering is it really that hard to make money? I just think of my first drum teacher for example. He's no drumming master, nor is he loaded of course

But he teaches, plays in a few bands etc and he does ok.

If including being a drum tutor is it still so hard? I understand a lucky break as a session drummer is much harder for example


Then again would I be happy teaching I'm not even sure.

One more thing I also love the idea of moving abroad, Spain or somewhere else in Europe. How does that change things? Easier/Harder to find work?
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Old 08-22-2017, 01:36 AM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrumWild View Post
Step 1: Marry well.

I left university 32 years ago to pursue music. It didn't really work out. What ended up happening was that I made a division in my head between what I do for money and what I do for happiness.

So when I need money, I work.

When I need happiness, I turn to music.

To me, happiness at work is about as unrealistic as a stable living in music. That's not to say that you can't do it. I do think the odds are stacked against artists, especially today, when we're a few generations deep into a culture that believes that music should be free. That's another discussion in a highly-heated thread nearby.

As an old fart, I can tell you that the trick to life is to NEVER stop learning. Right now, I'm learning some things that hopefully will land me a new career. At the same time, I'm taking guitar lessons and learning Music Theory.

Gotta take care of the work and money. Gotta take care of the music and happiness. Your mileage may vary. Beyond the advice to never stop learning, you may write off the rest of what I've said as anecdotal evidence that means nothing. Best of luck.

EDIT: One more thing... while I did leave university and pursue my dream, and fail miserably, a few important things happened. One was that I had a TON of fun making music. That was then. Now, I have absolutely NO old man regrets at all. No wondering "what if" or what could have been.

That's so great to hear from someone who was once in a similar position to me, really appreciate your advice.

So if you don't mind me asking, did you just try to get big with a band? Or did you try all manner of things (random gigs, giving lessons etc?
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Old 08-22-2017, 02:10 AM
DrumWild DrumWild is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Originally Posted by Drumsarefun View Post
That's so great to hear from someone who was once in a similar position to me, really appreciate your advice.

So if you don't mind me asking, did you just try to get big with a band? Or did you try all manner of things (random gigs, giving lessons etc?
I moved to LA with the goal of joining or forming a band, and then taking it somewhere. This was back when getting discovered was the goal.

There was one time where I ALMOST got there. Long story short, my band was checked out by a record executive during an important gig. He said that he was interested in signing us, and wanted us to go to his office.

We went, and he talked for a bit about how much his nephew loves the band. His nephew this and that. And then came the difficult word: He told me that I didn't have "the look" that a rock band needed, or that fans expected, and laid it all down, telling us that he would sign the band, but ONLY if his nephew replaced me.

I told the guys that I was going to leave, and that they should follow me if they can see that he'll do to them what he did to me. I walked out alone. They all signed without me.

The nephew turned out to be a prima donna who wasn't really all that good. The band suffered, the music suffered, and they got dropped for poor performance. It was more complicated than this, but that was it. My opinion is that they got dropped for wanting to kick the nephew out.

My story spans over 30 years, so I'll keep the anecdotes to a minimum.

Most of my bands ended up being for the sake of music, and did not make any money. My current band has been together for over 25 years, and I've only been a member for 15 years. We get a TON of love from Dr. Demento, and get some solid play in over 175 college radio markets in the US and Canada. That and ten bucks will get me a beer on the Sunset Strip, only if the bartender thinks that I'm cool enough to serve.

Joined a cover band for a while, but left after playing for 8 hours and making only $12. It happens.

I've had some students here and there, but it's all freelance and at people's homes. If you want to teach at a music store, then they want a degree on the wall.

I've done songwriting, and have submitted songs via an online service that matches songs up with artists. A few nibbles, but so far no big bites.

Right now, there are recording studios in California that are suffering, because everyone can record their own stuff. They still get business, but not as much.

Those who write and record movie scores do so over in Europe, because they can get studio musicians for $50/hour, while in the US the union players cost at least three times that amount. That's the word I got from someone who does professional mixing and mastering.

I was going to try getting some work scoring music for "adult entertainment" films, since Northridge was near where I lived at the time [the "adult" film capitol of the world, at the time]. But the internet has cut a big hole in that industry's budget.

It wasn't that long ago in LA that Josh Freese was playing on anybody and everybody's recording for almost nothing. He really lowered the rent. Wonder whatever happened to him.

That's not to say it's not impossible. There's a comedy retro metal band in LA called Steel Panther [formerly Metal Skool]. They're making BIG money in LA, San Diego, and Las Vegas. Last time I checked, that was their schedule, playing one night per week in each location. The drummer owns the project, and will show you his tattoos that represent when he was making $1,000 per week, $5,000 per week, $10,000 per week, $20,000 per week, and so on.

He owns the band and the concept, makes the backing tracks, licenses the backing tracks to other 80s tribute bands. He's also got some talented people in his band who have been at it for over 20 years before working with him, and they had relatively lower levels of success before this project.

If you can find our own niche, handle the business aspect, figure out how to monetize it, and don't mind working some previously uncharted territory, then you might be able to make something happen. For every Steel Panther, there are tens of thousands of other bands that make nothing of it.

I mention them because I don't want to be a complete downer. I gave it a shot, didn't get there, and have no regrets. I don't regret leaving university, either, because the music program at the time wasn't that great, and I'm learning more now in my individual private studies than I learned back then. Just beware of survivorship bias.

But if I had it to do all over again, I might have changed my university major to something business related and pursued a degree in that, so that the business knowledge could work in conjunction with my music knowledge. There are lots of new business models out there.

One of my guitar teachers taught in France and Spain for a while, and loved it.

I guess I can close my ramble with this:

My experience back then was my experience, and it was back then. The industry, fan expectations, purchasing habits, business models, and lots of other aspects have changed dramatically. They're not done changing. From my perspective, the environment is more hostile than ever.

You know you best, and the environment where you'll work to make things happen. Don't let me or my experience determine your decision. Instead, allow it to give you some pause for thought, to consider your own position, location, potential, and opportunities. In the end, you'll be the only one who can make the right decision. I could tell you YES or NO, and I'd be wrong in both instances.

Success, failure, benefits, consequences. They're all yours for the taking. If you try, you'll regret it. If you do NOT try, you'll regret it. That's Kierkegaard for ya.

And these children that you spit on
As they try to change their worlds
Are immune to your consultations
They're quite aware of what they're going through

-- David Bowie
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  #11  
Old 08-22-2017, 03:43 AM
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makinao makinao is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

I dont know how it works in your university, but if it's possible, don't quit completely or go AWOL. Take an official leave of absence for a term or a year. Spend the time 1) looking for other courses in your university that might excite you if you return, 2) checking out if a life of drumming exclusively really is enjoyable and profitable.

I took a semester off when I was a sophomore in pre-med because I wasn't happy. I came back and shifted to broadcasting, loved it, and got my bachelor's degree. I learned production in general, and most of my projects were musical. The college of music was right next door, so I was able to join the jazz band and the new music ensemble. After college I ended up as a college art professor (which took getting a Masters and a PhD), a part-time record producer (everything from church choirs to pop-rock bands), and a session drummer (once in a blue moon when my friends are really desperate, hehehe). I'm 59 and six years away from retirement. When I do, I promised myself that I'd enroll in drum lessons to get rid of bad habits I've picked up over the years, then form/join a band and play kick ass music :-)

Last edited by makinao; 08-22-2017 at 11:32 AM.
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:50 AM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

Seriously - try and get a gig on a cruise ship for six months - change of scenery, lots of playing, and some income.

My nephew is drumming around the Mediterranean at the moment, straight out of a jazz drums degree. I don't think he plans to do this beyond the six month contract, but its a great chance to try drumming for a living, for a controlled period of time.
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:54 AM
wildbill wildbill is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

What are you studying that you don't think you'd enjoy doing?
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Old 08-22-2017, 05:39 AM
Lee-Bro Lee-Bro is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

If you want to make a living playing music, then you're essentially starting your own business. Perhaps you don't view it that way, but that's what it is as soon as money gets involved.

Consider all the things a business owner/manager has to deal with:
-Who covers your performances if you get sick, injured, or want to go on holiday?
-Are you and your equipment properly insured? In the event of theft or destruction, do you know how to get replacement gear the same or next day? Do you have the funds available to buy replacement gear and then wait potentially several months to be reimbursed by an insurer?
-Should you get sick or injured, where will your income come from? In the U.S. even self-employed people can get their own disability insurance (paycheck insurance). You should look into the UK's version. - Check this site for a start: https://www.gov.uk/financial-help-disabled/overview
-How do you grow your brand in an already crowded marketplace?
-Is your business a specialty store or a variety store? In other words, can you play a variety of styles or just one?
-Do you have the proper tools to be in business for yourself? This includes not only the typical drums, cymbals, percussion, sticks, heads, etc., but also a way to transport your gear, a place to securely store it, etc.
-Who are your business partners and networking resources? In other words you're going to need to establish relationships with talent buyers, musicians, bands, production companies, etc. It takes time to go out and meet all these people.
-Are you good with time/calendar management? If not, look into software or apps that help you manage contacts and time.

I'm not trying dissuade you from pursuing a musical career. I'm offering some insight into the foundation things you should have in place before just making a go at it and figuring it all out along the way.

Re: obtaining a degree that you may never use, I have a degree in Political Science. I intended to go to law school. However, serendipity took me right into financial advisory right after graduation from my undergrad. The degree I obtained taught me a lot about doing research and other skills I use to this day with managing a band and running a financial advisory practice.
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Old 08-22-2017, 06:41 AM
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TheElectricCompany TheElectricCompany is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

All the advice here is fine and good, but do you have any audio or video of you playing? I could speculate all day about how my true calling and passion in life is to be a Major League Baseball player, but that's not taking into consideration I'm shit at the sport.

There's a million wildly talented musicians in the world and only so many paying gigs to go around. There are no paying gigs for the guys who just don't have the talent, and there's a lot more of those guys than the first category.
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Old 08-22-2017, 10:30 AM
mikel mikel is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

Its life. I spent 51 years doing jobs I either didnt like or hated, but they paid the bills and fed me.

Drumming and music were always the things I enjoyed in life, but over the years it was plain to see that as a career path it is tenuous at best. The number of good, well educated, musicians is huge and the job opportunities very small, so unless you can write great songs the chances would be limited.

Uni is not the only way into the job market. There must be something else that floats your boat? If you have manual dexterity, always probable with a drummer, go for an apprenticeship. You get paid while you learn a trade and Britain is crying out for trades people.

Music is always there regardless of the position you are now in, If you are lucky you could still end up as a full time drummer, sometimes you are simply in the right place at the right time with the right people. Luck is a big factor in earning a living from music
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Old 08-22-2017, 11:22 AM
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Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrumWild View Post
I moved to LA with the goal of joining or forming a band, and then taking it somewhere. This was back when getting discovered was the goal.

There was one time where I ALMOST got there. Long story short, my band was checked out by a record executive during an important gig. He said that he was interested in signing us, and wanted us to go to his office.

We went, and he talked for a bit about how much his nephew loves the band. His nephew this and that. And then came the difficult word: He told me that I didn't have "the look" that a rock band needed, or that fans expected, and laid it all down, telling us that he would sign the band, but ONLY if his nephew replaced me.

I told the guys that I was going to leave, and that they should follow me if they can see that he'll do to them what he did to me. I walked out alone. They all signed without me.

The nephew turned out to be a prima donna who wasn't really all that good. The band suffered, the music suffered, and they got dropped for poor performance. It was more complicated than this, but that was it. My opinion is that they got dropped for wanting to kick the nephew out.

My story spans over 30 years, so I'll keep the anecdotes to a minimum.

Most of my bands ended up being for the sake of music, and did not make any money. My current band has been together for over 25 years, and I've only been a member for 15 years. We get a TON of love from Dr. Demento, and get some solid play in over 175 college radio markets in the US and Canada. That and ten bucks will get me a beer on the Sunset Strip, only if the bartender thinks that I'm cool enough to serve.

Joined a cover band for a while, but left after playing for 8 hours and making only $12. It happens.

I've had some students here and there, but it's all freelance and at people's homes. If you want to teach at a music store, then they want a degree on the wall.

I've done songwriting, and have submitted songs via an online service that matches songs up with artists. A few nibbles, but so far no big bites.

Right now, there are recording studios in California that are suffering, because everyone can record their own stuff. They still get business, but not as much.

Those who write and record movie scores do so over in Europe, because they can get studio musicians for $50/hour, while in the US the union players cost at least three times that amount. That's the word I got from someone who does professional mixing and mastering.

I was going to try getting some work scoring music for "adult entertainment" films, since Northridge was near where I lived at the time [the "adult" film capitol of the world, at the time]. But the internet has cut a big hole in that industry's budget.

It wasn't that long ago in LA that Josh Freese was playing on anybody and everybody's recording for almost nothing. He really lowered the rent. Wonder whatever happened to him.

That's not to say it's not impossible. There's a comedy retro metal band in LA called Steel Panther [formerly Metal Skool]. They're making BIG money in LA, San Diego, and Las Vegas. Last time I checked, that was their schedule, playing one night per week in each location. The drummer owns the project, and will show you his tattoos that represent when he was making $1,000 per week, $5,000 per week, $10,000 per week, $20,000 per week, and so on.

He owns the band and the concept, makes the backing tracks, licenses the backing tracks to other 80s tribute bands. He's also got some talented people in his band who have been at it for over 20 years before working with him, and they had relatively lower levels of success before this project.

If you can find our own niche, handle the business aspect, figure out how to monetize it, and don't mind working some previously uncharted territory, then you might be able to make something happen. For every Steel Panther, there are tens of thousands of other bands that make nothing of it.

I mention them because I don't want to be a complete downer. I gave it a shot, didn't get there, and have no regrets. I don't regret leaving university, either, because the music program at the time wasn't that great, and I'm learning more now in my individual private studies than I learned back then. Just beware of survivorship bias.

But if I had it to do all over again, I might have changed my university major to something business related and pursued a degree in that, so that the business knowledge could work in conjunction with my music knowledge. There are lots of new business models out there.

One of my guitar teachers taught in France and Spain for a while, and loved it.

I guess I can close my ramble with this:

My experience back then was my experience, and it was back then. The industry, fan expectations, purchasing habits, business models, and lots of other aspects have changed dramatically. They're not done changing. From my perspective, the environment is more hostile than ever.

You know you best, and the environment where you'll work to make things happen. Don't let me or my experience determine your decision. Instead, allow it to give you some pause for thought, to consider your own position, location, potential, and opportunities. In the end, you'll be the only one who can make the right decision. I could tell you YES or NO, and I'd be wrong in both instances.

Success, failure, benefits, consequences. They're all yours for the taking. If you try, you'll regret it. If you do NOT try, you'll regret it. That's Kierkegaard for ya.

And these children that you spit on
As they try to change their worlds
Are immune to your consultations
They're quite aware of what they're going through

-- David Bowie
Wow, incredible story, thanks for sharing!

It does make me feel I'd be really out of my depth
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  #18  
Old 08-22-2017, 11:26 AM
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Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Originally Posted by wildbill View Post
What are you studying that you don't think you'd enjoy doing?
Biochemistry. I end up missing as many lectures as possible and making it up before exams. Worked well for me, but it just doesn't excite me
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Old 08-22-2017, 11:30 AM
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Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

Quote:
Originally Posted by Morrisman View Post
Seriously - try and get a gig on a cruise ship for six months - change of scenery, lots of playing, and some income.

My nephew is drumming around the Mediterranean at the moment, straight out of a jazz drums degree. I don't think he plans to do this beyond the six month contract, but its a great chance to try drumming for a living, for a controlled period of time.
Funny you should mention, my family mentioned that, and I really like the idea of that.

But it brings up another issue, are they really going to take me with such little experience?

Regarding the jazz drums degree, is that something that's needed? And more importantly, do people think degree in drumming is worth it? I would love to do that
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Old 08-22-2017, 11:34 AM
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Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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I dont know how it works in your university, but if it's possible, don't quit completely or go AWOL. Take an official leave of absence for a term or a year. Spend the time 1) looking for other courses in your university that might excite you if you return, 2) checking out if a life of drumming exclusively really is enjoyable and profitable. 3) consider something in which

I took a semester off when I was a sophomore in pre-med because I wasn't happy. I came back and shifted to broadcasting, loved it, and got my bachelor's degree. I learned production in general, and most of my projects were musical. The college of music was right next door, so I was able to join the jazz band and the new music ensemble. After college I ended up as a college art professor (which took getting a Masters and a PhD), a part-time record producer (everything from church choirs to pop-rock bands), and a session drummer (once in a blue moon when my friends are really desperate, hehehe). I'm 59 and six years away from retirement. When I do, I promised myself that I'd enroll in drum lessons to get rid of bad habits I've picked up over the years, then form/join a band and play kick ass music :-)

I am considering a year off yes the may let me.

As an alternative to my degree, what are people's thoughts on a drumming degree/qualification of some sort, can it be a big help in finding work?

If I took a year off now and tried to make drums work, I wouldn't even know where to start frankly. Which does make me think, that I'd be out of my depth
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Old 08-22-2017, 12:47 PM
Matt Bo Eder
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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As an alternative to my degree, what are people's thoughts on a drumming degree/qualification of some sort, can it be a big help in finding work?
Not sure, as any higher education results are really dependent on how much you believe in it and are willing to work at it with all of it's benefits.

Consider the great Tony Williams, however. When he wanted to learn about music composition, he didn't go to college. He hired the composition professor from San Francisco University for private lessons. Many schools in the US hire many qualified jazz stars to be educators and they are a big attraction for students to go to those schools to attend. However, what if you cut the college out altogether and just found working professionals for private lessons? You would probably learn what it takes to be a professional musician in a lot shorter time and for a lot less money than if you had gone to school.

I say go to college if you lack motivation and imagination. But if you are willing to take your drumming to the next level and learn how to be a businessman as a professional musician, I say seek out the local pros for private tutelage.

I just look at higher education as just as much a risk as doing what you really want to do. There's no guarantees that anything will pan out - it's all up to you. But what bugs me about higher education, especially music higher education, is that it's pretty apparent that you're gonna spend a lot of money, for no guarantees you'll be making a living at what you love. The analogy I use for this situation is going into a restaurant and ordering something to eat, and then as soon as you get it, throw it away!

If I'm gonna pay thousands to a "music school", then that means I want something at the end of my time there. If they can't guarantee you a job to pay back all the loans, why would I give them my money?

Whatever you do to make money, doesn't have to be a set career. Lots of people I know have jobs, but continue to plug away playing music, and many of them are happy because they're not in student loan debt hell. They've managed to live comfortably and get to pursue playing drums while not having to worry where rent is coming from or the next meal.

Do college if you really want to, just know that there's the chance everything you learn in college will have nothing to do with how you make ends meet.
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Old 08-22-2017, 12:51 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

There are people making a living just playing music. People with a teaching degree in music like me are generally better off finacially, but that balance is up to each one to decide.

At 19 yo there's no danger in taking a year(or ten) off. If nothing happens you'll just approach your future studies in a more mature manner and be more certain about your choice.

If you just want to do music it has to be for the love of it. Understand that if you go that route then a normal life and normal finacial situation may not be realistic. You will not get the exact same paycheck every month. It's always been that way, but there are plenty of people who found happiness anyway. Just know what you are doing and don't think it will be easy. Expect to work twice as much as anyone else in an average steady job.

You have to be really good and then start focusing on the skills that really matter. Networking.
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Old 08-22-2017, 01:18 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

While you're young go for it. Don't get to 30 and look back going what if. Can't imagine how bad that must feel.

What I will say is if you hate uni, you're in for one hell of a rude awakening when you have to put up with the horseshit 9-5 jobs!

Do a music degree if you're good enough to. Be aware that there's some really crap courses out there that are just after your money. I'd recommend doing Music with Pop Music as a secondary or something with jazz studies/music tech. Don't just do a straight Pop Music degree, you end up with some really bad players. The straight music bit is bloody hard but worth it.

Outside of teaching there's not a lot of money to be made playing other than functions which is what I do. It's good money when you're busy but there's no guaranteed work and you have to be prepared to dep at the drop of a hat.

Failing uni, get a good drum teacher and practice a lot. Start networking and see where it takes you.
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Old 08-22-2017, 02:07 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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While you're young go for it. Don't get to 30 and look back going what if. Can't imagine how bad that must feel.

What I will say is if you hate uni, you're in for one hell of a rude awakening when you have to put up with the horseshit 9-5 jobs!

Do a music degree if you're good enough to. Be aware that there's some really crap courses out there that are just after your money. I'd recommend doing Music with Pop Music as a secondary or something with jazz studies/music tech. Don't just do a straight Pop Music degree, you end up with some really bad players. The straight music bit is bloody hard but worth it.

Outside of teaching there's not a lot of money to be made playing other than functions which is what I do. It's good money when you're busy but there's no guaranteed work and you have to be prepared to dep at the drop of a hat.

Failing uni, get a good drum teacher and practice a lot. Start networking and see where it takes you.
Thanks. So a general music degree is favourable over a drumming degree? I have seen colleges offering that - a 3 year drumming course but they are all "contemporary" music schools.

I would love to leave uni and just get private lessons, but it seems a huge risk.

As for networking, how exactly do I start that? I'm just not sure how to even begin that if i don't know people
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Old 08-22-2017, 02:14 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Not sure, as any higher education results are really dependent on how much you believe in it and are willing to work at it with all of it's benefits.

Consider the great Tony Williams, however. When he wanted to learn about music composition, he didn't go to college. He hired the composition professor from San Francisco University for private lessons. Many schools in the US hire many qualified jazz stars to be educators and they are a big attraction for students to go to those schools to attend. However, what if you cut the college out altogether and just found working professionals for private lessons? You would probably learn what it takes to be a professional musician in a lot shorter time and for a lot less money than if you had gone to school.

I say go to college if you lack motivation and imagination. But if you are willing to take your drumming to the next level and learn how to be a businessman as a professional musician, I say seek out the local pros for private tutelage.

I just look at higher education as just as much a risk as doing what you really want to do. There's no guarantees that anything will pan out - it's all up to you. But what bugs me about higher education, especially music higher education, is that it's pretty apparent that you're gonna spend a lot of money, for no guarantees you'll be making a living at what you love. The analogy I use for this situation is going into a restaurant and ordering something to eat, and then as soon as you get it, throw it away!

If I'm gonna pay thousands to a "music school", then that means I want something at the end of my time there. If they can't guarantee you a job to pay back all the loans, why would I give them my money?

Whatever you do to make money, doesn't have to be a set career. Lots of people I know have jobs, but continue to plug away playing music, and many of them are happy because they're not in student loan debt hell. They've managed to live comfortably and get to pursue playing drums while not having to worry where rent is coming from or the next meal.

Do college if you really want to, just know that there's the chance everything you learn in college will have nothing to do with how you make ends meet.
Good points, thanks. It would seem scary to spend all that money on private lessons which may lead to nothing, but as you said the same could happen with any degree.

It just feels less stable but I suppose that's the sacrifice


Does anyone have experience in finding drumming work abroad? Perhaps with a holiday company, as I'd consider moving to somewhere in Europe if I did some travelling and enjoyed it enough
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Old 08-22-2017, 03:14 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Thanks. So a general music degree is favourable over a drumming degree? I have seen colleges offering that - a 3 year drumming course but they are all "contemporary" music schools.

I would love to leave uni and just get private lessons, but it seems a huge risk.

As for networking, how exactly do I start that? I'm just not sure how to even begin that if i don't know people
3 years of drumming, I'm going back to uni again! You can probably specialise in percussion but having a wider knowledge of music can only help you. How are you meant to learn to work with other musicians if there's only drummers on your course?

Networking is easy, just reply to musician ads and start jamming with people and you'll meet people through people
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Old 08-22-2017, 03:21 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Funny you should mention, my family mentioned that, and I really like the idea of that.

But it brings up another issue, are they really going to take me with such little experience?

Regarding the jazz drums degree, is that something that's needed? And more importantly, do people think degree in drumming is worth it? I would love to do that
It didn't used to be, but now it is.

There are really two tracks:

1. Get a music degree and teach, privately or in school. An advanced degree will allow you to teach at the university level. Some kind of music degree is expected if you want to teach at a local studio or music store. The music university experience will allow you to network and develop non-drumset skills like chart reading, which will create more gigging opportunities for you.

2. Get some other degree (science, engineering, business, skilled trade) and finance your love of playing that way.

A third, but costly option would be to get both degrees.

(Biochemistry degree here, btw.)
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Old 08-22-2017, 03:27 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Does anyone have experience in finding drumming work abroad? Perhaps with a holiday company, as I'd consider moving to somewhere in Europe if I did some travelling and enjoyed it enough
Cruise ship work is really the best way, because you'll be interacting with musicians from all over the world. You'd better be good at reading, playing to a click, and know lots of styles very well, though. Make sure to pack a practice pad...
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Old 08-22-2017, 03:49 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

Ok, in the UK you have some of the cheapest tuition in the world (depending on which part of the UK you live). Here in the States, it's pretty common for students to graduate with anywhere between $60,000 and $100,000 in debt. Go get a degree in something you don't hate.

The ONLY way I'd drop out of school to do music full time is if I had an incredible opportunity that I wouldn't ever get again, like with a major act. Use your time at college to network with other musicians. Get your degree BEFORE you get married and start having kids because, believe me, it changes everything.

A quick story: I quit being a full-time student back in the 1990s to do music as full time as possible and work part time. After 9 years, I finally got my 4-year degree. Got married a month after I graduated. I went back to school and got my masters degree. Had a kid. Then, I went back and got my educational specialist degree. Had another kid halfway through that program. I've since had kid #3, and I don't plan on going back to school again at this point. I could not IMAGINE trying to go back to school at this point to get a college degree. It would be a nightmare. Oh, and my job? I teach English at a local community college, and I still do music on the weekends and I love it. I have been where you are. I quit school, and I shouldn't have. Now, I'm about a decade behind where I want to be in terms of my career, retirement, etc. However, this is my path and it's not been easy. Things are good now.

Get the degree.

Also, whoever said above that this is probably the worst time to try to pursue music is absolutely right. There is NO money to be made right now. The industry is colon-cleansing itself right now.
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:00 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

Harking back to the point that TheElectricCompany made earlier in the thread, how good are you?
I've been mulling over this post over the course of the morning and wanted to add something insightful and positive but knowing what I do about your situation (which isn't a lot) my advice is to either stay on your current University course and work on your drumming career at the same time, switch courses to something that interests you and work on your drumming career, or get a job and work on your drumming career. Those decisions should be based on your attitude to University, not the drumming side, by which I mean are you attracted towards drumming (which is a positive thing) or are you clutching at an idea because you're being motivated by wanting to get away from University (which is a negative thing).
You've said in a recent reply that you don't know how to network. Now all of us need to start somewhere but to consider such a life changing decision while not even having the basics in place is not a good starting point.

The new University year is about a month away and in my opinion you've left such an important decision a bit late. I don't make a living with my playing and I haven't been to University so bear in mind that my lack of experience takes validity away from my opinion, but my perception of the working music scene in the UK is that it's far smaller and harder to get into than the it is in the US. You mentioned cruise ships as an option, if you're a highly skilled drummer then I'm sure that's do able but the current incumbents of those drum stools aren't mugs and I'll bet there's a line of excellent players ready to step into those jobs when they become available. It all boils down to that original point, how good are you at this moment?
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:05 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Cruise ship work is really the best way, because you'll be interacting with musicians from all over the world. You'd better be good at reading, playing to a click, and know lots of styles very well, though. Make sure to pack a practice pad...

I'd love to do this so much, but again surely it is very hard to find work? Why on earth would they choose a 19 year old who's played a few live sets over someone with hundreds of hours of experience?

I suppose there's no harm in a year off uni and just giving it a shot
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:14 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Ok, in the UK you have some of the cheapest tuition in the world (depending on which part of the UK you live). Here in the States, it's pretty common for students to graduate with anywhere between $60,000 and $100,000 in debt. Go get a degree in something you don't hate.

The ONLY way I'd drop out of school to do music full time is if I had an incredible opportunity that I wouldn't ever get again, like with a major act. Use your time at college to network with other musicians. Get your degree BEFORE you get married and start having kids because, believe me, it changes everything.

A quick story: I quit being a full-time student back in the 1990s to do music as full time as possible and work part time. After 9 years, I finally got my 4-year degree. Got married a month after I graduated. I went back to school and got my masters degree. Had a kid. Then, I went back and got my educational specialist degree. Had another kid halfway through that program. I've since had kid #3, and I don't plan on going back to school again at this point. I could not IMAGINE trying to go back to school at this point to get a college degree. It would be a nightmare. Oh, and my job? I teach English at a local community college, and I still do music on the weekends and I love it. I have been where you are. I quit school, and I shouldn't have. Now, I'm about a decade behind where I want to be in terms of my career, retirement, etc. However, this is my path and it's not been easy. Things are good now.

Get the degree.

Also, whoever said above that this is probably the worst time to try to pursue music is absolutely right. There is NO money to be made right now. The industry is colon-cleansing itself right now.

So what is the reason for that? What has changed making it so hard at this moment to make money?

In regards to kids, I have never in my life wanted kids. Now that may change of course, but I don't like being tied down. In a way all of this dropping out of uni thing is coming from not just wanting an ordinary life with a job 9-6 that I don't like.

It may be wishful thinking and me just being young, but I don't see why that has become the norm in society. I have one chance at life and going school>college>boring job>family>retire doesn't appeal all that much to me. Of course there is nothing wrong with it! It just doesn't sit right with me I guess.


Then again, I realise it's easy for me to say that now, when I'm dependant on my parents to provide for me. I know money is a necessity and a fantasy world where you can just follow your dreams and be ok doesn't exist.

I am trying to be realistic, but I don't want to live a life of disappointment either.

Thanks for all the help - I am reading each reply super carefully and taking on board everything you're all saying :)
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:15 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Ok, in the UK you have some of the cheapest tuition in the world (depending on which part of the UK you live). Here in the States, it's pretty common for students to graduate with anywhere between $60,000 and $100,000 in debt. Go get a degree in something you don't hate.

The ONLY way I'd drop out of school to do music full time is if I had an incredible opportunity that I wouldn't ever get again, like with a major act. Use your time at college to network with other musicians. Get your degree BEFORE you get married and start having kids because, believe me, it changes everything.

A quick story: I quit being a full-time student back in the 1990s to do music as full time as possible and work part time. After 9 years, I finally got my 4-year degree. Got married a month after I graduated. I went back to school and got my masters degree. Had a kid. Then, I went back and got my educational specialist degree. Had another kid halfway through that program. I've since had kid #3, and I don't plan on going back to school again at this point. I could not IMAGINE trying to go back to school at this point to get a college degree. It would be a nightmare. Oh, and my job? I teach English at a local community college, and I still do music on the weekends and I love it. I have been where you are. I quit school, and I shouldn't have. Now, I'm about a decade behind where I want to be in terms of my career, retirement, etc. However, this is my path and it's not been easy. Things are good now.

Get the degree.

Also, whoever said above that this is probably the worst time to try to pursue music is absolutely right. There is NO money to be made right now. The industry is colon-cleansing itself right now.
Great advice PPG. You have the best attitude and all you said embodies what to me means to be a man.

I thought about taking a year off during my younger years to go off to the mountains of British Columbia. Had I done so, I would not have my wife nor 2 wonderful kids, nor probably a job to provide for their needs. Now that would have been a catastrophe.

My advice for what it's worth : go to school, you will not regret it.

I play drums mostly during lunchtime and after the kids go to sleep, and make time for recording sessions in between when a project I like is offered to me. I refuse cover band gigs as I do not feel like dismounting a simple cymbal stand for the money. To be honest, I am starting to prefer taking my family out and pay to be entertained rather thant the other way around.
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:22 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

I would say:

Take a year off to learn other instruments like piano and guitar and then write your own tunes.

In that time, take whatever lessons you feel are necessary and perhaps invest in a computer and a DAW

I think you'd learn more practical knowledge in a year than you would at uni. Unless if you did theory perhaps

Oh and move to London :)
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:36 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Harking back to the point that TheElectricCompany made earlier in the thread, how good are you?
I've been mulling over this post over the course of the morning and wanted to add something insightful and positive but knowing what I do about your situation (which isn't a lot) my advice is to either stay on your current University course and work on your drumming career at the same time, switch courses to something that interests you and work on your drumming career, or get a job and work on your drumming career. Those decisions should be based on your attitude to University, not the drumming side, by which I mean are you attracted towards drumming (which is a positive thing) or are you clutching at an idea because you're being motivated by wanting to get away from University (which is a negative thing).
You've said in a recent reply that you don't know how to network. Now all of us need to start somewhere but to consider such a life changing decision while not even having the basics in place is not a good starting point.

The new University year is about a month away and in my opinion you've left such an important decision a bit late. I don't make a living with my playing and I haven't been to University so bear in mind that my lack of experience takes validity away from my opinion, but my perception of the working music scene in the UK is that it's far smaller and harder to get into than the it is in the US. You mentioned cruise ships as an option, if you're a highly skilled drummer then I'm sure that's do able but the current incumbents of those drum stools aren't mugs and I'll bet there's a line of excellent players ready to step into those jobs when they become available. It all boils down to that original point, how good are you at this moment?
OK, well of course it is very hard for me to objectively assess how good I am. I am very critical of my playing in general and never satisfied with my current level of play regardless of how much I improve.

I've been playing around 8 years now. I suppose my range of playing styles is more limited than I would prefer. Jazz I play at a basic level, and generally rock/gospel/funk are the styles I feel I can play to a high standard.

I guess all I have to go by is my drum teachers in the past and what they have said. All have said I have natural feel/technique. One in particular would always say have the best half-time shuffle he has ever seen (haha!), he would make me show his other students.

While nice to hear, it is of course really meaningless, he is A) bias because I'm his student and B) a small time teacher, not a big guy at the top of his game. Regardless those sorts of things gave me hope as a younger teen about making a living from drums :) I guess that's where it all started

Other than me trying to get some footage of my practising and showing you all, it's hard for me to analyse myself.


Of course there are millions far far more talented than me, who practice much more. And certainly I need to work on my versatility, playing different styles/different forms of percussion etc.

All in all I'd guess I probably am not good enough, but I certainly believe I could get there with some serious dedicated practice over the next few years.

I suppose the idea of getting into brass band/ jazz band/ rock band/ playing musicals at uni isn't too bad. Get my skills up, work my ass off and then when I've got my degree go for a music career with everything for a few years.

However, I'm not sure I could shake the feeling that I haven't given myself the BEST chance by going to study a percussion/music degree at Royal College of Music, for example :)
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:51 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

A 9 to 5 job doesn't have to be necessarily boring. A job doesn't necessarily have to be from 9 to 5. Lots of jobs allow you to administrate your own time - but that also has its disadvantages. I have a job that is not boring for me and I actually like most of it.... but it's still a job. I'm glad I'm not doing music as a main job because I don't think I would enjoy it as much. I know people who do (music as a job) and love it, though, whether it's teaching, playing or recording.

The main issue here is that you need to be prepared to do more than one thing in your life, in case you're not able to do the things you'd like to do most. College/University doesn't guarantee that you'll get a job but it does open new doors and increases the possibility of getting a decent job.

Now, don't go for a degree on something you don't like just because you think it'll get you a job. Get a degree on something you like and you're good at. Sure, you'll have to take some courses you might not like or even hate, but such is life. Take it like a man. Hey, you might end up actually liking stuff you didn't think you would.

I don't know how demanding school is for you, but when I was at the uni I had plenty of time to pursue other interests. That changes radically once you get a job, marry and have kids. So keep doing the drum thing while you're in school, get some lessons, practice a lot, form a band and play out. Universities are good places to find all kinds of opportunities and you will likely meet people who are already into it and can hook you up.
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:53 PM
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

Hey, thanks for taking the time to read my reply and taking it to heart! Hopefully I can clarify some things to help.

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So what is the reason for that? What has changed making it so hard at this moment to make money?
Back before file sharing, YouTube, online radio stations, etc., musicians made a good amount of money from selling physical copies of music. Don't get me wrong, people are still listening to tons of music; however, about 95% of all music downloaded each year is done so illegally. Granted, there are still ways to make some money, such as live shows (ticket sales/cover charges at the door) and other merch (e.g. t-shirts, stickers, etc.), but all of that money that's sunk into studio time OR studio equipment you buy yourself will not have a direct return on investment outside of using it to get gigs. I know vinyl sales are up quite a bit, but have you looked at how much it costs to press a record? It's ridiculous. Plus, God forbid your band break up after buying a lot of merch to sell. All of my musician friends have boxes and boxes of CDs that are gathering dust because they can't sell them because their previous bands don't exist. I gave away a huge bag of t-shirts and stickers to a fan of one of our old bands.

In addition, venues to play music are becoming less and less. Granted, it can vary from place to place, but around here, our band makes anywhere from nothing to about $400/gig. Split 4 ways, that's not a lot to live on. Plus, bigwigs from record companies are cracking down on bars and other venues playing cover tunes. It's really bad. Heck, I've heard of restaurants that are starting to get in trouble playing music over the speaker system because that particular business is using other people's music to make money. It's awful.

Also, gone are the days of being a "session drummer" in a studio. Those don't exist anymore.

So the combination of giving away your music for free, venues not paying anything, and a decline in venues overall, there's just not any music to be made.

Keep in mind that right now there are about 20,000 bands (literally) trying to "make it" in the music industry. What makes you so good or valuable where you will be head and shoulders above them? (Not trying to be mean here. I'm just a realist.)

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Originally Posted by Drumsarefun View Post

In regards to kids, I have never in my life wanted kids. Now that may change of course, but I don't like being tied down. In a way all of this dropping out of uni thing is coming from not just wanting an ordinary life with a job 9-6 that I don't like.

It may be wishful thinking and me just being young, but I don't see why that has become the norm in society. I have one chance at life and going school>college>boring job>family>retire doesn't appeal all that much to me. Of course there is nothing wrong with it! It just doesn't sit right with me I guess.

Then again, I realise it's easy for me to say that now, when I'm dependant on my parents to provide for me. I know money is a necessity and a fantasy world where you can just follow your dreams and be ok doesn't exist.

I am trying to be realistic, but I don't want to live a life of disappointment either.

Thanks for all the help - I am reading each reply super carefully and taking on board everything you're all saying :)
I'm amazed at how self-aware you are at the age of 19! I wish I was when I was your age! :)

Yes, don't be surprised if your feelings towards kids and family change as you get older, but at the same time, don't be surprised if they don't. If you don't want kids, for God's sake, don't let anyone talk you into it. I have a former band mate who thought that having kids would "fix" his marriage problems. They won't.

Also, I totally get not wanting the normal 9-5 job. I wanted to be a full-time musician so bad I could taste it back when I was in my 20s.

Wow, I just did a search for me putting music on the backburner, and it was written exactly 10 years ago today!!! Here's a link of something I put on Acoustic Guitar Forum:

http://www.acousticguitarforum.com/f...d.php?t=106695

Granted I still do music, but it was 10 years ago I gave up trying to do it full time.


I'll share with you a book that totally changed my life (literally) in regards to the music industry. It's a book called "Confessions of a Record Producer," and it's one of the best books I've ever read. https://www.amazon.com/Confessions-R...s=moses+avalon

Do yourself a favor and buy this book. It's incredibly good, and just about everything you want and need to know are in it. You. Need. This. Book. If I still had my copy, I'd mail it to you. Don't worry, it's an easy and fast read.

Best of luck! :)
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  #38  
Old 08-22-2017, 05:02 PM
wildbill wildbill is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Originally Posted by Drumsarefun View Post
So what is the reason for that? What has changed making it so hard at this moment to make money?
....
Digital technology.
People used to play, and listen to, live music much more often.
And if they wanted it 'on-demand', they bought an LP, or a tape.
Venues large and small used live music as a draw.
Downloading stuff on the internet, and DJ's pretty much wiped the slate clean.

About your situation. Use your time at the Uni to explore stuff and find something that interests and excites you more than bio-chem.
Take the oddball course that sounds like it might be cool just for fun.

I don't want to rain on the parade, but I don't think there's much chance at all for a cruise ship gig for you, given the level of competition.
Of course, you could just chuck it all and try to make a living playing drums,
as many millions of others have. Who knows - you could win the lottery.

In the end, it's your decision. You have to decide the level of risk, and the level of compromise that you can live with.
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Old 08-22-2017, 05:04 PM
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Drumsarefun Drumsarefun is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Originally Posted by PorkPieGuy View Post

Also, gone are the days of being a "session drummer" in a studio. Those don't exist anymore.

So the combination of giving away your music for free, venues not paying anything, and a decline in venues overall, there's just not any music to be made.

Keep in mind that right now there are about 20,000 bands (literally) trying to "make it" in the music industry. What makes you so good or valuable where you will be head and shoulders above them? (Not trying to be mean here. I'm just a realist.)



I'm amazed at how self-aware you are at the age of 19! I wish I was when I was your age! :)


Do yourself a favor and buy this book. It's incredibly good, and just about everything you want and need to know are in it. You. Need. This. Book. If I still had my copy, I'd mail it to you. Don't worry, it's an easy and fast read.

Best of luck! :)

Well thanks for saying that, means a lot, although truthfully I couldn't feel more clueless.

Book is ordered and on it's way, will give it a read :)


As for session drummers not existing anymore, I can only assume that's due to technology and the ability to make beats on a computer?

Surely there are still people (especially in non-electronic music) that want good drummers with a real drum kit?
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  #40  
Old 08-22-2017, 05:15 PM
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PorkPieGuy PorkPieGuy is offline
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Default Re: Revaluating life - want to drop uni and pursue drums

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Originally Posted by Drumsarefun View Post
Well thanks for saying that, means a lot, although truthfully I couldn't feel more clueless.

Book is ordered and on it's way, will give it a read :)


As for sessions drummers not existing anymore, I can only assume that's due to technology and the ability to make beats on a computer?

Surely there are still people (especially in non-electronic music) that want good drummers with a real drum kit?
Good for you on ordering that book!

As far as session drummers not existing, I think there are some session drummers out there, but just a handful. The novice bands already have a drummer. Singer/Songwriters just use loops and drum programs or friends who play drums. The big Nashville/Los Angeles scene is already saturated with drummers who could fit any bill in regards to recording. Your average listener can't tell the difference between a sampled drum set on a loop and a "real" drummer played in real time. Heck, the guy who produced my church's last CD looped a lot of my playing. It's sounds very sterile, but I don't care b/c my heart really isn't into the project. However, your average listener won't know the difference.

Also, I think that it's a safe bet to say that if you want to pursue music full time, there is going to be a season or two where you are having to play music that you don't like in order to make the bills. For example, most people want to be in a band and play stadiums, but don't be surprised if you end up playing oldies and beach music at wedding receptions (which these ARE actually good money here in the States). The only time I've gotten to tour was with a "band." I auditioned for drums, but I ended up playing bass and keyboards for 11 straight weeks (6 nights a week). It was awful, but I got paid.

It's a lot to think about. :)
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