DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussion forum for all drum related topics. Use this forum to exchange ideas and information with your fellow drummers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #41  
Old 07-05-2017, 03:47 AM
JustJames's Avatar
JustJames JustJames is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 2,975
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Maserati already make a vehicle well suited for carrying drums.

Face-ache warning!

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 07-05-2017, 03:56 AM
GruntersDad's Avatar
GruntersDad GruntersDad is offline
Administrator - Mayor
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Gulf Coast Seminole, Florida
Posts: 22,162
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJames View Post
Maserati already make a vehicle well suited for carrying drums.

Face-ache warning!

...and at 73,000 USD what a bargain.
__________________
johnny
Suum cuique tribuere....
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 07-05-2017, 04:00 AM
paradiddle pete's Avatar
paradiddle pete paradiddle pete is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: down south
Posts: 1,522
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by GruntersDad View Post
...and at 73,000 USD what a bargain.
Bet it sounds good though.
__________________
petey poo!
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 07-05-2017, 04:41 AM
Groov-E Groov-E is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 830
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJames View Post
Maserati already make a vehicle well suited for carrying drums.

Face-ache warning!

Ohhh I'd carry a pearl export in this baby anyday !
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 07-05-2017, 05:24 AM
KamaK KamaK is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: East Coast
Posts: 5,685
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by GruntersDad View Post
...and at 73,000 USD what a bargain.
You can pick it up used for $12,5 in 3 years. Maserati's only speed record is their depreciation.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 07-05-2017, 09:10 AM
picodon's Avatar
picodon picodon is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: France
Posts: 665
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Some people try to rationalize the irrational human mind :)
My theory is, a kit (or anything) can only make you thoroughly happy if you paid a shit lot of money for it. Always buy the kit you can't really afford ;)
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 07-05-2017, 11:15 AM
StaggerLee StaggerLee is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: maldon, essex
Posts: 843
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

I think this question is a tough one with many answers, but heres my take on it:

Firstly, it depends on if your asking cheap to manufacture, or you paid cheaply for it. I know many people who have paid very little for professional kits because they are second hand, that doesn't make them any less of a high end professional kit, it just means you paid less for it. But I get the idea this isn't what you mean.

As for cheap to manufacture etc, it all depends how well its built. On top of that, it depends on what era your talking about. A "cheap low end" kit from the 60s and 70s for example is usually what you would consider in the professional and semi-professional ranges today.
Heres a little example of this. Keep reading until you decide its not appealing anymore:

The kit has full rounded bearing edges.

The kit has thin 3 ply shells with re-rings.

The kit has high tension withstanding lugs.

The kit has a collapsible cymbal mount on the bass drum.

The kit has fold-able spurs for ease of transport.

The bass drum has a very sturdy tom mount.

Floor tom has the full 8 lugs.

Rack tom has 5 lugs.

Bass drum has 6 lugs.



Now i bet you only shirked at the last part. However, that kit only costs £160 (I know as I own it), yet it better built than most kits worth 5x that amount. If you want a modern shell set of thin 3 ply shells and vintage round overs, you're going to pay a lot more.

As for stuff like gretsch blackhawks, mapex storms etc etc, they will sound ok with nice new heads etc, but their is an inherently better sound when you start getting to good shells and great craftsmanship. Are you willing to pay to get that little bit extra more each time? Thats up to the buyer, but their is no denying that more expensive drums do sound better than the less expensive with a very few exceptions. You can't expect your CB drums to sound like Gurus.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 07-05-2017, 12:22 PM
paradiddle pete's Avatar
paradiddle pete paradiddle pete is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: down south
Posts: 1,522
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

The real question is Cheap vs Expensive Drummers. Which one are you ?
__________________
petey poo!
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 07-15-2017, 12:03 PM
cornman21 cornman21 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 4
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

I think you can take the cheapest drum set, slap some fancy heads on, and it will sound great. Along with proper tuning which takes some skill, and there are a lot of ways to control overtones and other things. If you have bad snare wires you can always replace them. I think snares though are the hardest to make sound good so you might want to invest in a better one if its bad. Also cymbals are impossible to make sound better so your going to have to open up your wallet for those.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 07-15-2017, 01:22 PM
Odd-Arne Oseberg's Avatar
Odd-Arne Oseberg Odd-Arne Oseberg is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sykkylven, Møre og Romsdal, Norway
Posts: 3,492
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

The absolute cheapest stuff usually isn't too good. The snares often suck no matter what and bass drums are often too just meh.

Now, I've played a first generation Catalina for years and apart from the snare it's quite a lot of kit for the money. There have some bearing edge issues, but assuming it's ok, if you can't make that kit sound good it's not the drums.

Here in Norway, the US Custom kit I'm saving up for will be 10x the price. There's no way to justify that in a quality vs price sort of way, it's just simply the only way to get the sound I want.

Price vs quality and quality of sound is there in a way, but it's more about how and where the thing you want it produced.

Made in Taiwan is cheaper than made in th US. Big manufacturers can cut cost in ways smaller builders can't. That still depends, though.


The biggest things here right now is the value of our national currency.


Still depends, though. It's not like the PHX is everyone's favourite Yamaha offering.

With the big gaps?

See. I believe I can make a Catalina or Stage Custom live up to it's max potential, and in most live situations the customer will be happy, but my favourite kit will make that easier, there will be a response I can't get any other way and I'll also play better because it makes me happy.

There are things like Craviotto. They're amazing drums and I've sure loved every snare I've tried from them. As for the rest of the kit. I'd love to have one, but it wouldn't suit my general thing.

Some guitar players like strats, some teles, les pauls, 335s or whatever. It's common to have more than one, but we know what feels like home and what you'll probably play almost exclusively as you get older and the GAS thing dies off.

When we factor in every part of a process wood would have to be pretty expensive to change the price a lot. Labour, rent, adds and import taxes would generally influence the price much more.

Also, wood isn't as far as I know priced based on acoustic quality. It can be in a way, but modern technology has helped a lot there. There's very little waste when it comes to materials with specific purpose.

For actual price there's a reason second hand is the recommendation. Unless you want something specific you'll get much more for your money and if it's 50 years old and still sounds good, you know it's a good one.
__________________
So, kick drum...or...bass drum? I'll tell you what. If it's 18" or less, it's a FOOT TOM.
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 07-18-2017, 03:35 PM
beyondbetrayal beyondbetrayal is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: canada
Posts: 1,835
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

I bought a cheap little kit for gigs and it sounds fantastic.. The plus side is I don't have my "baby" I spent all that money on unsupervised while I'm wandering around the bar.. I have never had many issues but if something happens to the cheap kit I'll be a lot less upset/angry.

You know who plays the SQ2's , Masterworks, and other tippy top professional sets? PROFESSIONALS... Those endorsements really help to offset the cost of their $10k kits to bring them to where they should be sitting. Unless you have some crazy off the wall size, or silly wood request with a weird bearing edge idea there is a reason why standard (ISH) sizes and kits exist.

Also, live it is very true, after the distortion, volume, mic's and eq, gates, compressors and everything else come into play (depending on style) It is very difficult to tell if your kit was expensive or not in the speakers if you know how to tune.
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 07-18-2017, 03:51 PM
PorkPieGuy's Avatar
PorkPieGuy PorkPieGuy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 2,267
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

I went from a set of 9-ply poplar, early 1990s Tama Rockstars to a set of American maple, Keller shell set of Pork Pie USA customs.

The difference was huge.

Each drum, from the 10" rack tom to the 22" kick, simply sound amazing. It's like they all punch you in different parts of your gut as you're playing them.

Even still, the BEST part of my Pork Pie drums is that it actually sounds like one instrument. For example, the best sounding parts of my Rockstar kit are the 8" tom, the 16" tom, and the kick. The 12" and the 10" toms are "meh" and the snare sound good recorded but simply doesn't sound good live. It either rings too much or it sounds dead as a door nail. There is no in-between with that snare drum. However, there's something about those Pork Pies. Each drum is not any louder or softer than the next. Each drum, including the kick and the matching 13" snare have the exact same resonance, cut, decay, presence, and volume as the next. It sounds like ONE instrument as opposed to a sum of its parts. I have only played a handful of drum sets that sound like one instrument. It seems like there are many out there that sound great, but there's always a little bit of a weak link. Not my my Pork Pie kit though.

Good-sounding drums (and especially cymbals) from the cockpit make me want to be a better player. Crummy sounding drums don't inspire me to practice; however, a great-sounding drum set make me want to get better. I know many drum sets sound pretty darn good about 10 feet out, but that's not where I'm sitting. I'm sitting behind them, and they have sound good to me before I want to play them. Overall, more expensive drums with good heads are as good as it gets.

Overall, there is a big difference between cheap drums and expensive drums...to my ears anyways.
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 07-18-2017, 04:47 PM
AzHeat's Avatar
AzHeat AzHeat is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Arizona
Posts: 1,482
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

I've never had a good set and for me the 10" and 16" toms are a never ending battle. The 8" was worse, so I shed that a while back.

I've played two absolutely killer sets in 35 years that blew me off my thrown. The first was a 90s DW kit that was used by Eddie Money's band the night before. No tuning required. I set up my cymbals and went around the kit and it was heaven. Then the PA came on!

The second was a 100% beat to death Tama Starclassic b/b at a local practice studio. At first it was like most kits, heads taped up with 50 pounds of gaphers tape, tension set to concrete on everything, etc. it had a relatively new set of G2s on it and I had a few extra minutes, before everyone got tuned up, so I went around the set with a drum key and removed all the tape and WOW! I've never gotten my own set to sound that amazing and the Tama had sustain chocking cast hoops on it.

Sorry guys. I keep hearing and reading about good heads and tuning and nothing compares to a good foundation of a well made set of shells. I've spend hours tuning my drums and couldn't get anywhere near what I got out of those Tamas in 10 minute!
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 07-18-2017, 05:09 PM
PorkPieGuy's Avatar
PorkPieGuy PorkPieGuy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 2,267
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by AzHeat View Post

Sorry guys. I keep hearing and reading about good heads and tuning and nothing compares to a good foundation of a well made set of shells. I've spend hours tuning my drums and couldn't get anywhere near what I got out of those Tamas in 10 minute!
I agree. It's all about signal chain IMO.

I've heard nothing but great things about b/b Tamas. I'd love to try out a set.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 07-18-2017, 05:13 PM
Morrisman's Avatar
Morrisman Morrisman is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: South Australia
Posts: 1,570
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

I think its a bit like buying a cheap car. Its absolutely fine when its new. Not quite as fast or smooth as more expensive one, but more than adequate for daily commuting. A super expensive car will specialize in certain areas, and will have every component carefully designed for a specific purpose.

A few years down the track a cheap car will start falling apart, while a well built car will keep going strong.

A really cheap kit - can sound OK but will go out of tune quickly, and things will start to bend and break after a while.
A mid-range kit will last for years and do the job.
An expensive, well made kit will last forever, will sound great, and can be customized for specific needs.
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 07-18-2017, 08:07 PM
adamosmianski adamosmianski is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 262
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

A cheap kit can be made to sound good, but there is most certainly a difference in sound, durability and aesthetics.

Cheaper kits are often made from (surprise) cheaper wood. Bearing edges are often cut with less care. They often have lower quality hardware, and less lugs. Sure, with some decent heads and TLC, nearly any kit can sound passable, but lower end models will definitely be more difficult tune and have a smaller range.

Higher end kits are not only easier to work with, but you have a lot more control over the specifics of the sound. I also find they often really do have that certain je ne sais quoi that puts their sound above that of a cheaper kit. Is the average drunk dude in a bar going to notice? Most certainly not. But those with discerning taste will. The difference will also be markedly higher in a studio situation with high quality microphones.

Don't forget the middle ground as well. I saw some people mention the Catalina Club kits, and I have to agree with the haters. They are not very good drums, even for the money. As far as I'm concerned, the best "work horse" kit out there that balances quality and price is the Yamaha Stage Custom. They're sturdy, easy to work with, take an absolute beating, and will continue to sound great.
__________________
Check out That Drum Blog - drumming and more
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 07-19-2017, 07:49 AM
JustJames's Avatar
JustJames JustJames is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 2,975
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by cornman21 View Post
I think you can take the cheapest drum set, slap some fancy heads on, and it will sound great...
The trouble with putting decent heads on a cheap kit (by which I mean basic, starter level kit, not an older Pearl Export or similar that happens to cost not much money) is that the cost of the heads becomes a significant fraction of the value of the kit, and if you take to drumming and decide to upgrade, you'll never see that money again.

My advice for beginners is this: buy the cheapest non-toy drum kit you can find. Learn the basics on that kit. Do absolutely nothing to improve the kit. If you take to drumming, sell the kit for what you paid for it and tip some more money into the fund and buy something that is worthy of upgrades. I use the Pearl Export as an example because there are plenty of them and they are inexpensive, but mostly 'cause that's the route I took. There are equivalent level kits from other manufacturers and the same advice applies.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 07-19-2017, 08:19 AM
paradiddle pete's Avatar
paradiddle pete paradiddle pete is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: down south
Posts: 1,522
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

[quote=JustJames;1512972]The trouble with putting decent heads on a cheap kit (by which I mean basic, starter level kit, ...................It's putting lipstick on a pig , let's face it. And not all decent heads sound good on all drums either. If you are serious buy the best you can afford.. is my advice.
__________________
petey poo!
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 07-19-2017, 09:16 AM
JustJames's Avatar
JustJames JustJames is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 2,975
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

[quote=paradiddle pete;1512975]
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJames View Post
The trouble with putting decent heads on a cheap kit (by which I mean basic, starter level kit, ...................It's putting lipstick on a pig , let's face it. And not all decent heads sound good on all drums either. If you are serious buy the best you can afford.. is my advice.
Buy the best you can is always good advice when you know you're going to stick with something.

The nice thing about drumming, is that you can play the drums just as well on the most godawful kit as on the best high end piece of boutiquey gorgeousness.

The high end kit will sound better, but really, the mechanics of playing don't change. Contrast with a guitar, where a crappy guitar is difficult to learn on because when a guitar can't be tuned, it's hard to know which bits of the awful tone are from the guitar and which from the guitarist.

The cheapest kit won't stop a beginner from learning the basics. Once the basics have been learnt, then it's time to spend like a drunken sailor on shore leave.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 07-19-2017, 10:51 AM
T_Weaves's Avatar
T_Weaves T_Weaves is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Forest Hills, PA
Posts: 911
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by PorkPieGuy View Post
I went from a set of 9-ply poplar, early 1990s Tama Rockstars to a set of American maple, Keller shell set of Pork Pie USA customs.

The difference was huge.

Each drum, from the 10" rack tom to the 22" kick, simply sound amazing. It's like they all punch you in different parts of your gut as you're playing them.

Even still, the BEST part of my Pork Pie drums is that it actually sounds like one instrument. For example, the best sounding parts of my Rockstar kit are the 8" tom, the 16" tom, and the kick. The 12" and the 10" toms are "meh" and the snare sound good recorded but simply doesn't sound good live. It either rings too much or it sounds dead as a door nail. There is no in-between with that snare drum. However, there's something about those Pork Pies. Each drum is not any louder or softer than the next. Each drum, including the kick and the matching 13" snare have the exact same resonance, cut, decay, presence, and volume as the next. It sounds like ONE instrument as opposed to a sum of its parts. I have only played a handful of drum sets that sound like one instrument. It seems like there are many out there that sound great, but there's always a little bit of a weak link. Not my my Pork Pie kit though.

Good-sounding drums (and especially cymbals) from the cockpit make me want to be a better player. Crummy sounding drums don't inspire me to practice; however, a great-sounding drum set make me want to get better. I know many drum sets sound pretty darn good about 10 feet out, but that's not where I'm sitting. I'm sitting behind them, and they have sound good to me before I want to play them. Overall, more expensive drums with good heads are as good as it gets.

Overall, there is a big difference between cheap drums and expensive drums...to my ears anyways.
I totally agree. My Mapex Black Panther Black Widow kit is a complete set of drums that becomes a single instrument. Not one of the drums cause me to wish it sounded better. Not only am I able to communicate through it, it speaks back to me in these glorious tones and that's with 2 ply heads on it or the stock ambassador suedes. I've had several kits come through the house in the last year or two and not one has given me pause to take over the Black Widow's #1 status. To be honest the only thing I'd change on it would be to put a bass drum mounted tom mound on it. Bottom line is it's a keeper. I think it's beautiful, it creates my sound, with sizes and classy sonic saver hoops in brushed nickel. You can't go wrong with North American Maple thin shells. And I got it on a nice sale price too !! Make no mistake though it's a high end kit.
Reply With Quote
  #61  
Old 07-19-2017, 12:23 PM
belairien's Avatar
belairien belairien is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Wimer Oregon
Posts: 803
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Imho, high end isn't worth the money. The more my stuff costs, the less I want to play it for fear of damaging something. Especially when it comes to gigging.

Also imo, my sub $400 Ludwig element birch kit blows away most high end kits I've played for tones vs cost. Including high end DWs. I freaking hate the way those sound. The only high end kits I've liked were made by Tama and Mapex.

Its the same for guitars too. I recently bought a cheaper one over the Fender Tele I went in to buy. Played smoother and sounded on par if not better. Even had more features.


I think my view may be skewed this way after watching someone drop a high end Gibson LP I used to own. I still have nightmares on occasion, watching the neck split in three places. A 3k instrument destroyed, my dream guitar shattered and a permanent hole left in my heart.

Still bitter 5 years later. Can't bring myself to spend that kind of money on things that other people (or myself) could accidentally destroy.
__________________
"We're not here for your breakdowns! We're here for your beer!" ~Graveburner
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 07-19-2017, 01:47 PM
resunoiz resunoiz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 109
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

what I learned in 20+ years of drums:

- cheap drums can sound good or bad...randomly. expensive generally doesn't, have a "minimum standard".

same cheap drums, same finishes, same series..some have stunning sound, some not. or maybe a marvelous floor tom and terrible toms or vice versa. good drums sounds "standardly" good: you can find a shell with a flaw, a manifacture issue but is mainly an isolated case.

- generally snare in cheap kits are low level.

- hardware in cheap drums is the main issue. some marvelous shells have to be holded with some tape or soldered to stay in place :) and with intensive use tends to get loose soon. expensive drums generally doesn't.

- cheap hardware results in difficult tuning maintenance.

- an expensive drum doesn't make a drummer more skilled...actually an expensive kit has the main culprit with unexperienced drummer to think that "that drum model" will result in a better playing.

- 70% of the drum sound is in your hands (read point above twice)
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 07-19-2017, 03:46 PM
bigiainw's Avatar
bigiainw bigiainw is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Scotland
Posts: 1,101
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

I have 2 drumsets, a very inexpensive but well made Natal Arcadia Jazz and a relatively more expensive Mapex Saturn 3 with lots of toms and a 22"bass drum. Both sound great. I don't have any concerns about either falling part. There is a difference in build quality in favour of the Saturn, but you really need to dig deep to find it. Hardware on both seems to be perfectly durable.

I don't think a top end kit is required for a good sound. If you can tune then you will likely get a decent sound out of practically anything if it has decent heads on. What I would say though is echoing the comments above in terms of buying the best you can afford- there really is no substitute. This is especially true when talking about cymbals, but that's another thread entirely!
__________________
Hit me with your rhythm stick
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 07-19-2017, 04:16 PM
PorkPieGuy's Avatar
PorkPieGuy PorkPieGuy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 2,267
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by T_Weaves View Post
To be honest the only thing I'd change on it would be to put a bass drum mounted tom mount on it.




Quote:
Originally Posted by resunoiz View Post

- cheap drums can sound good or bad...randomly. expensive generally doesn't, have a "minimum standard".

same cheap drums, same finishes, same series..some have stunning sound, some not. or maybe a marvelous floor tom and terrible toms or vice versa. good drums sounds "standardly" good: you can find a shell with a flaw, a manifacture issue but is mainly an isolated case.
I agree with this 100%. I think what you are paying for is consistent quality when it comes to higher-end instruments. I remember seeing this whenever I was shopping for an acoustic guitar. Some cheaper guitars would sound pretty good while most were complete duds. I ended up buying an upper-end Taylor because every one of the same model I tried in various stores sounded almost exactly the same. It was expensive, but I had no issues ordering one from a reputable dealer sight-unseen due to both the quality of the instrument and the incredible return policy. What you are paying for is consistency in an upper-end instrument.

Quote:
Originally Posted by resunoiz View Post
- generally snare in cheap kits are low level.

- hardware in cheap drums is the main issue. some marvelous shells have to be held with some tape or soldered to stay in place :) and with intensive use tends to get loose soon. expensive drums generally doesn't.
I didn't really understand the value of quality instruments until I went on the road with a band for 11 weeks (playing 6 nights a week...if not more). It's one thing to have a day job, but when you depend on your equipment night after night with load-ins and load-outs every day, you need your instrument to work every time you plug it in and/or set it up. At some point, you really do stop caring about the nitpicky stuff about your instrument...the finish, the shine, look, etc. because you are simply too tired to. You are there to do a job, have some fun, and get out. A good quality instrument will sound great in a variety of venues, locations, and rooms. Once again, there's a consistency there that one gets from quality instrument as opposed to a cheaper one. When you are on the road and you are playing gigs out in BFE at weird hours, there's not going to be a music store on every corner to go buy replacement hardware. As much as you try to keep your instrument looking good, it's going to get some road-wear and some scars. However, those scars are going to represent stories. I'd much rather have a quality instrument with some scars.

Quote:
Originally Posted by resunoiz View Post

- an expensive drum doesn't make a drummer more skilled...actually an expensive kit has the main culprit with unexperienced drummer to think that "that drum model" will result in a better playing.
I agree. However, I will add that a better instrument might inspire a young player to play and practice MORE than if he/she has a crummy set. No, a new instrument will not instantly make a player better, but there's still something about having a quality instrument. For example, I remember trying to learn a certain fingerstyle pattern on my old acoustic guitar. It was a dreadnought-shaped guitar with 1-11/16 string spacing at the nut (insert tasteless joke here). The first time I picked up a better instrument, a 000-sized Martin with a 1-3/4 width neck and played the same pattern, I did so flawlessly...unlike the hours of playing I tried on my current guitar. Now, did the new INSTANTLY make me a better player? No it didn't; however, it was definitely a better tool for the job. It sure did make me sound better than I did before.

Quote:
Originally Posted by resunoiz View Post
- 70% of the drum sound is in your hands (read point above twice)
I agree 100%. With that said, I've never met an amazing novice player with a crummy instrument. Yes, the majority of it is in your hands, but a good instrument sure helps! :)
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 07-19-2017, 04:22 PM
AzHeat's Avatar
AzHeat AzHeat is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Arizona
Posts: 1,482
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Anyone seen Bernard Purdie's Drumeo video?
https://youtu.be/8pFysHHLM08

I think this says it all to cheap vs expensive. I've never seen so much tape and deadening material on a head and yet have so much sustain remaining. Never heard a midrange kit that can sing like that, let alone a cheap kit.
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 07-19-2017, 04:44 PM
resunoiz resunoiz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 109
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

Quote:
Originally Posted by PorkPieGuy View Post
For example, I remember trying to learn a certain fingerstyle pattern on my old acoustic guitar. It was a dreadnought-shaped guitar with 1-11/16 string spacing at the nut (insert tasteless joke here). The first time I picked up a better instrument, a 000-sized Martin with a 1-3/4 width neck and played the same pattern, I did so flawlessly...unlike the hours of playing I tried on my current guitar. Now, did the new INSTANTLY make me a better player? No it didn't; however, it was definitely a better tool for the job. It sure did make me sound better than I did before.
guitar is quite different. because is not only a sound that changes but there are factors like the neck width and deep, scale (far/near frets) and bridge height.
factors of "handling" that in drums you can control with lighter/bigger sticks and different heads. the guitar, apart from strings is "as is is" (apart from a specific setup, similar to head and sticks).

obviously as said, 70% of sound is in your hand but 30% is in the instrument, too. but is less relevant, expecially in drums IMHO. if you're poor on timing or fills for example, a starclassic custom vs my old, ugly and rusty ranger kit from the 90's won't help you, but a correct kit setup in seat height and distances from throne will :)
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 07-21-2017, 02:27 PM
STXBob's Avatar
STXBob STXBob is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Harrisburg, PA USA
Posts: 1,342
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

I found these three videos most informative. They're all by Mapex artist Charlie Kenny, and they show (in my opinion) the capabilities of modern recording, the instruments themselves, and how sound is "in the hands."

You can actually hear the difference between the kits. Now, it might be down to different stuff in the recording chain, but you can definitely hear a difference. Thanks to the different camera angles, you can also see differences - different muffling techniques (and amounts), etc. Notice the kits retain the cheap stock heads! That's huge for those of us who like to prattle on with "get a cheap kit and swap out the heads."

First, Storm series. Then Mars series. Then Armory. It goes from "Entry" to "Entry+" to "Intermediate."

That said, one of the things Pork Pie Guy wrote above is important - if you're going to be riding that horse hard and putting it away wet, chances are a cheap, entry-level kit won't be durable enough to last. But if you're not playing a heavily-demanding schedule, or if you are but you're not bouncing from place to place, you can probably get away with an inexpensive kit.
__________________
Cheers,

Bob Davis

www.reconstructinghistory.com
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 09-11-2017, 01:23 PM
resunoiz resunoiz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 109
Default Re: Cheap vs expensive kits

resume that thread.

cheap vs expensive kits?
those screws are 22years old, never cleaned nor protected from humidity.

brand new.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com