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  #1  
Old 03-29-2017, 02:29 PM
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Default Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

I've been asked to provide a kit for a gig my band is doing that other bands on the bill will be using.

I've already decided I don't want my DW's to be used and have bought a Yamaha Stage Custom that will be used in these situations.

What is the etiquette with cymbals?
I don't particularly want to buy a disposable set of cymbals that get put on the kit but I will if it means I don't have to let anyone use my Keropes.

What do you do about situations where another drummer pits the drum heads or misaligns the bass drum beater and dents the bass drum head?
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Old 03-29-2017, 02:58 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

No real rules for such things, you just say how you want it.

If people are used to foing to school or renting rehearsals rooms they know that cymbals are usually not provided. You wil usually bring snare and BD if you care and some might even bring a throne if they have special needs.

If people are just playing one or two songs in a jam setting the, of course, everything should be provided.

In your case I think I would call the other guys and find an agreement. Most likely they will want to use some of their own stuff. If you all get paid giving you a little bit for kit rental is fair.

If they damage gear, they shouldn't be on the stand at all, but in any case they should pay for it.
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Old 03-29-2017, 03:06 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

It's a space saving reason.
Everybody else brings their cymbals, snare and pedal and they should get the notification to do so.
Use double ply heads if you're worried.
I put some extra felt and a clutch in my cymbal box.
I bring my good set if I know the other bands aren't terrible.
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Old 03-29-2017, 03:07 PM
Groov-E Groov-E is offline
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

IMO you provide the shells and hardware, that's it.

Guys bring their snare, pedal, cymbals.

Some even bring their hardware but I feel sometimes you need to move the kit to retrieve all h/w and install your own, so I would tend to play the kit "as is" with h/w and minimal adjustments.

Throne should be in its case as sometimes other drummers sit extra low with their knees above their hips and have a mini-throne you can barely adjust. That reeeaaally sucks.
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Old 03-29-2017, 03:40 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

I agree with the shells and hardware piece....if I knew I was sharing I would load everything but my BD and Toms in the car just in case......sans all the hardware....but maybe a couple extra cymbal stands just in case. At minimum I would be prepared with snare, pedal and cymbals.

In the past I used to cringe when I had to share my gear at a couple gigs and luckily my stuff made it through OK......

If this was a regular occurrence I would be looking for a used Stage Custom or something along those lines that would be palatable but not something I would cry over minor bumps and bruises.
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Old 03-29-2017, 03:44 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

Yeah typically people mostly bring their own Snare, Pedal and Cymbals but my main advice is communicate to the other players about what they need to bring in advance so there is no confusion/guesswork on their part.
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Old 03-29-2017, 04:43 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

Juniper: Yeah typically people mostly bring their own Snare, Pedal and Cymbals but my main advice is communicate to the other players about what they need to bring in advance so there is no confusion/guesswork on their part.


Yes to what Juniper said!

Your drum heads will probably get dented. Don't stress out about this. Just leave those heads on your shared kit.

I was in the house band for a weekly jam. I brought a cheap snare drum and cheaper cymbals just for the jammers.
After I played for the first hour, I swapped out my good snare and cymbals for the cheaper ones.
The drum heads got dented. I used those dented heads for over one year. Then I swapped them out with some slightly used heads. No big deal.

.
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Old 03-29-2017, 04:43 PM
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  #8  
Old 03-29-2017, 05:17 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

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Originally Posted by Hollywood Jim View Post
Juniper: Yeah typically people mostly bring their own Snare, Pedal and Cymbals but my main advice is communicate to the other players about what they need to bring in advance so there is no confusion/guesswork on their part.


Yes to what Juniper said!

Your drum heads will probably get dented. Don't stress out about this. Just leave those heads on your shared kit.

I was in the house band for a weekly jam. I brought a cheap snare drum and cheaper cymbals just for the jammers.
After I played for the first hour, I swapped out my good snare and cymbals for the cheaper ones.
The drum heads got dented. I used those dented heads for over one year. Then I swapped them out with some slightly used heads. No big deal.

.
Thanks for all the responses so far.

Regarding heads- my plan was to swap out the heads on the beater kit every so often with hand-me-downs from my recording kit.
They are the same sizes, expect for the bass drum, so it should be ok.
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  #9  
Old 03-29-2017, 05:48 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

Had a similar problem a few months back where I had to use someone else's kit.

http://drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=134578

In the end I took all my own gear (so did the rest of the band), as it turns out the venue hadn't checked it was cool for us to use their backline. I feel bad using other peoples hard earned equipment anyway.

Good etiquette is like this. If you're playing a gig have the equipment to do it and don't assume someone will let you use their instrument. Don't lend cymbals or anything breakable as they won't pay for them or replace them should the unthinkable happen.

Venues shouldn't ask you to provide a kit for everyone else. They should have a house kit. That kills any arguments dead in the water. You don't see guitarists providing a guitar for other bands to use and they're way cheaper to fix if something breaks.
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Old 03-29-2017, 06:54 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

Another vote for putting a set of "B" heads on it. DON'T lend your cymbals out.

Provide a footpedal, drums including a "B" snare with a lesser set of heads, and cymbal/hi hat stands,snare stand/throne.
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  #11  
Old 03-29-2017, 07:03 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

I've played on dozens of shared kits and always bring my cymbals, snare, kick pedal & hi hat stand (if the donor hat stand is lousy, I set up mine).
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  #12  
Old 03-29-2017, 07:12 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

Good call on using the "backup kit" yamaha if you are providing backline. It's kind of assumed the drummers will provide BD pedal, sticks & cymbals. Have a decent Hi-Hat stand there but watch for 1 douche trying to walk off w/ the clutch (keep a backup clutch). Then you may be pleasantly surprised on lack of head denting. But i put on coated Emperors on my kit & they were fine / scuffed normally.

Only thing i would add is that you should do the sound check on the kit. at one gig where i provided backline, the MF-ING sound douche checked the bass drum signal by pounding on the front head w/ a drum stick...scuffing up the formerly pristine front logo head. Did i mention i slaved on hand building a yamaha front logo head ? F that guy.
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  #13  
Old 03-29-2017, 09:01 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

Most bases are covered pretty thoroughly by other comments, but I'll add one thing. You were concerned about dents in the bass drum head - get a Remo Falam Slam patch and put on there. Get the double one in case people bring a double pedal. It can still be used with a single pedal. (Mine, anyway!) Those things do more to improve head life than anything else I've tried.
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  #14  
Old 03-29-2017, 10:26 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

This is the producer trying to get something for nothing.

Contract your provision of goods and services - spell out what happens when things are damaged(as they will be).

Its no different than the producer asking you to provide lights or security...for free.

Refuse to donate goods and services unless you are independently wealthy and can afford it.

Don't be taken advantage of!! Many people(if not most) in the music business will try to...but the trick is to not throw it in anyone's face...but to approach it professionally...with ready made contracts in hand and fully signed before consideration is given or provided.

If you are trying to get exposure, buy it from a Publicist/Public Relations Expert. The exposure is usually not equivalent to the risk of goods when 'loaning' drums.

Understanding these basic business concepts will pay off if you have any success down the line...as the risk gets bigger as you progress.

Last edited by Otto; 03-29-2017 at 10:37 PM.
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  #15  
Old 03-29-2017, 10:53 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

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Originally Posted by Otto View Post
This is the producer trying to get something for nothing.

Contract your provision of goods and services - spell out what happens when things are damaged(as they will be).
Doesn't really apply here- our band is running the gig- we are headlining and our lead singer is essentially the booker of the other bands.
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  #16  
Old 03-29-2017, 10:57 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

Are you being compensated by the project kitty for your provision of goods and services?

If not I would advise allowing everyone to supply their own equipment.

I have found over the years that once $ comes into play, peoples relationships tend to start disintegrating...best to avoid the possibility with clear and equitable contracting...no matter how faithful you think things are.

I think consulting a lawyer to get boiler plate agreements both for the person who has the contact for the venue in their name as well as the other musicians you are providing services/goods to will pay itself off in the end.

In that written and signed contract you can list exactly what happens when something is damaged and exactly what you are providing.

Most people jump into this with trust and eventually get burnt.

Sounds like I might be preaching to the choir though.. : )
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  #17  
Old 03-30-2017, 03:27 AM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

If I'm the headliner I'll provide my kit to others. It's a DW, I really don't get the "cheaper kit for gigs" school of thought. I tell other drummers to bring their snare and any cymbals and pedals they think they need. I want my own snare sound, and most other drummers want their own too, so this is usually not an issue. I freely offer my cymbals (and they are expensive!), but I understand that we all have our preferences. So basically bring anything you think you want or need and your snare. In fairness though, for me this happens rarely and usually it's just a double bill. For example we asked another local act to join us for a gig and we used my kit. Another time I played a casino with a band that was in from Chicago. The house kit was a hot mess, so I offered mine. That kid was absolutely fantastic and he was extremely thankful and classy. I don't regret a thing.. I play nice places though.
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Old 03-30-2017, 06:03 AM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gwetschdwummer View Post
I've been asked to provide a kit for a gig my band is doing that other bands on the bill will be using.

I've already decided I don't want my DW's to be used and have bought a Yamaha Stage Custom that will be used in these situations.

What is the etiquette with cymbals?
I don't particularly want to buy a disposable set of cymbals that get put on the kit but I will if it means I don't have to let anyone use my Keropes.

What do you do about situations where another drummer pits the drum heads or misaligns the bass drum beater and dents the bass drum head?


If you can provide a crash you don't care about. I'll let others play my good rides, not really worried about them getting damaged, its a ride cymbal, HH's too, not concerned about damage. Crash cymbals, yes, concerned, or don't like to be, so switch them out.

You can get a decent used crash for under $100, good to have in your bag if anyone sits in.

Heads- there's nothing you can do about them really, put on lesser heads. I always carry FALAM SLAM pads in my stick bag with some duct tape, I'll tape the FALAM pad onto the beater contact spot on rental kits so I don't blow thru a head while playing. You can tape a pad on your bass drum head, position it for the next person if you're onstage when they switch over, easy if its just taped on.
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Old 03-30-2017, 10:23 AM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

To paraphrase someone on here - "you need to get better gigs"

In seriousness though, you've got all the advice you need, all I would add is that you need to stand your ground. If people don't bring their snare or cymbals or pedal, tell them that they don't play your kit.

Drums are too expensive to let numpties trash em, stick to yer guns, fight them if you need to :-)

I use a Stage Custom with EC2 heads on for my "caring, sharing" kit and it works a treat. No-one is allowed to touch my Paiste Signatures or my Prolite snare (unless they're my friend and I know them as a drummer) and yes, it has come to blows once. Everyone tries to guilt trip into lending people your cymbals - "It's only one set, it's only this, it's only that, blah blah blah" but I am strong enough (with the dark side) to stand my ground and say no.

Even if they say "well the gig doesn't go ahead then", I tell em fine, we're the headline act, you are still obliged to pay us according to the contract as you have cancelled the gig for a reason not stipulated in the agreement.

I hate multi line up gigs on a small stage - big stage no worries, bring all your own gear
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Old 03-30-2017, 11:42 AM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

From my experiences both as donor and recipient.
Provide bass, toms, and hardware only.
The drummer provides his/her own snare, bass drum pedal and cymbals. These are the items that arguably take the biggest beating at a gig/are most likely to succumb to damage/are expensive to replace/are awkward to replace on the spot. If someone goes through their own snare drum skin or damages their own equipment and it's obvious that they're not an abuser of gear then I'm happy to lend mine at that point to see them through.
No one moves anything! The stool, snare stand and hi hat stand and maybe some of the cymbal stands can be moved around but not height or angle adjusted without prior permission.
The drummer uses his own drumsticks (yes, seriously!!). If like me you've got a bag full of cheap but good seconds then by all means leave them to be used, better to donate £2 worth of sticks than find your heads all black, sticky, and marked by a chipped drum tip.
If you're the recipient take your own hardware too, I've been expected to put my cymbals on stands with no felts or nylon washers and that bag of hardware I bothered to hump along with me proved its worth.
Have your own hi hat clutch, it just speeds things along
No one height adjusts the stool, they either sit at the height you've set or they bring their own stool.

That's it off the top of my head. The best way to get things running smoothly is to touch base with the other drummer/s ahead of the event and state in a non confrontational manner what you're providing, your expectations and what they need to bring. If you're talking to someone who's had even a small amount of experience you'll probably find that they're going to broadly agree with you anyway. If you're talking to someone with no experience who this all comes as a genuine surprise to then you're doing them and the local drumming community a favour.
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Old 03-30-2017, 12:00 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnoWorld View Post
To paraphrase someone on here - "you need to get better gigs"

In seriousness though, you've got all the advice you need, all I would add is that you need to stand your ground. If people don't bring their snare or cymbals or pedal, tell them that they don't play your kit.

Drums are too expensive to let numpties trash em, stick to yer guns, fight them if you need to :-)

I use a Stage Custom with EC2 heads on for my "caring, sharing" kit and it works a treat. No-one is allowed to touch my Paiste Signatures or my Prolite snare (unless they're my friend and I know them as a drummer) and yes, it has come to blows once. Everyone tries to guilt trip into lending people your cymbals - "It's only one set, it's only this, it's only that, blah blah blah" but I am strong enough (with the dark side) to stand my ground and say no.

Even if they say "well the gig doesn't go ahead then", I tell em fine, we're the headline act, you are still obliged to pay us according to the contract as you have cancelled the gig for a reason not stipulated in the agreement.

I hate multi line up gigs on a small stage - big stage no worries, bring all your own gear
Agreed, you sound battle hardened. This is why I ducked out of the original scene a while back.

I had some cretin rest a tom on my freshly recovered kit and put a hole in the finish. The guy disappeared before I could pummel him. Funnily enough since that day nobody has used any of my kits.

We make it clear to any booking agents that in the rare event of anyone supporting us that they bring their gear.
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  #22  
Old 03-30-2017, 02:20 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

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Agreed, you sound battle hardened. This is why I ducked out of the original scene a while back.

I had some cretin rest a tom on my freshly recovered kit and put a hole in the finish. The guy disappeared before I could pummel him. Funnily enough since that day nobody has used any of my kits.

We make it clear to any booking agents that in the rare event of anyone supporting us that they bring their gear.
Unfortunately I am, but it's the same premise that people use to get out of paying you too.

People play on your emotions in the music industry like no other and there are always w@nkers to take advantage of that.

The ol' "come on, you're a decent human being" cr@p really winds me up too as it is a form of bullying.

I am a very decent human being, to decent human beings.

I must stress though that these incidents have been very few and far between, however, you have to protect yourself and your investment when playing gigs in less than reputable areas, which is where I have played most of mine.
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Old 03-30-2017, 04:26 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

On one occasion which I supplied the kit, I did ask the other players to bring their own snare, pedal and cymbals. One of the drummers moved my snare stand and the memory lock. So from now on I will ask them to bring their own stands or agree to not move mine.
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Old 03-31-2017, 02:28 AM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

I do the standard "bring your cymbals, snare, and bass drum pedal" but I tend to also tell them to bring their own hi hat stand, since my pull rod is cut down pretty short.

I've also learned over the years that sharing your throne on a five band gig in the summer can leave you with some pretty gnarly upholstery on your seat. No harm in telling other dudes to bring their own butt support.

My main rule of etiquette is do not screw with my memory locks or try to change the tuning, and if you need to collapse or raise a bunch of stand sections, at least let me see what you're doing so I know what I need to do to fix it when it's my turn to play.
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Old 03-31-2017, 12:16 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

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Originally Posted by drummer-russ View Post
On one occasion which I supplied the kit, I did ask the other players to bring their own snare, pedal and cymbals. One of the drummers moved my snare stand and the memory lock. So from now on I will ask them to bring their own stands or agree to not move mine.
Adjusting memory locks is a no no. I've also seen people change Tom angles by grabbing the Tom and man handling it with no attempt to loosen any of the wingnuts. And as a previous poster has pointed out there are people who genuinely think that the bass drum shell is a valid place to support a Tom by taking its weight against it.

The "problem" with Drummerworld is that even though we may have our disagreements, we are a community of sensible drummers and we've become accustomed to reasonable standards of behaviour and intelligence. There's a whole other world of numpties out there who have no idea about caring for gear (there's included) or manners so when our worlds collide were shocked at what we see.
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Old 04-02-2017, 04:51 AM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

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There's a whole other world of numpties out there who have no idea about caring for gear (there's included) or manners so when our worlds collide we're shocked at what we see.
no kidding! I played a showcase gig at a local theater once with my old band. The guy booking wanted to showcase young bands in the area, but widened his search when he didn't find enough young ones, and invited some older veteran bands to play to round it out. No one kit shared. As i was coming in after stacking my drums (in cases) in a corner of the green room area, I heard a funny noise out the back door. They had a tall loading dock with a long ramp down the side to the back parking lot. A kid was rolling his nice Tama bass drum up the ramp. No case, rolling it bare with chunky tom mount up the concrete ramp, ka-thunk ka-thunk ka-thunk! He saw my cases, drum cart, and bungee cables and asked me about them. I tried to bite my tongue and calmly suggested to him it would be NICE if you SAVED UP for some of your OWN cases to protect your nice HARD EARNED drums.. haha.. I think he was kinda embarrassed.. kids, ugh! You can't make this stuff up!
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Old 04-02-2017, 02:17 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

Like others have said I think mostly it's just about having some decency, respect and manners towards other people and their gear.

If I am using another drummers gear I always make the point of going up to thank them, then ask what they are/aren't happy with (for example can I adjust/move things) and if they would like a pint or two.

I feel you show some respect people are generally cool most of the time.

The worst example of the opposit I have witnessed was a long time ago. Both my band and the openers were using most of the headlines gear as it was offered. The opening band turned up and the drummer asked me if he could use my pedal, snare and cymbals despite it being communicated in advance those were items he needed to bring himself. His excuse was that he 'forgot' so I naturally turned him down, plus his attitude and demeana was way off.

Anyway he borrows the headlines full kit, the band take to the stage later on and proceeded to bash the hell out of it. Their set finalle? The lead singer punches and kicks the drums apart, throws amps and mic stands to the floor and generally trashes the stage full of borrowed gear.

I seriously had to restrain myself from getting arrested that night on behalf of the headline band. Still can't believe the cheek and lack of respect some 14 or so years later typing this.

&"?!*
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Old 04-02-2017, 04:58 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

I go through this every year. Playing in an oldies band here in the Boston area we open up for lots of oldies acts. So these bands always use our back line. For the most part these drummers really appreciate the use of the drums. The issues that have occurred that pissed me off have been dented heads from a very hard hitter, stick scratches on the top of the bass drum and one guy decides during the middle of his show he doesn't want two toms up and decides to remove a tom during his set. Nothing major but now they get my 4 piece wrapped kit, no more lacquer finish drums for these guys unless I know the drummer.
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Old 04-02-2017, 09:29 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

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Originally Posted by Juniper View Post

The worst example of the opposit I have witnessed was a long time ago. Both my band and the openers were using most of the headlines gear as it was offered. The opening band turned up and the drummer asked me if he could use my pedal, snare and cymbals despite it being communicated in advance those were items he needed to bring himself. His excuse was that he 'forgot' so I naturally turned him down, plus his attitude and demeana was way off.

Anyway he borrows the headlines full kit, the band take to the stage later on and proceeded to bash the hell out of it. Their set finalle? The lead singer punches and kicks the drums apart, throws amps and mic stands to the floor and generally trashes the stage full of borrowed gear.

I seriously had to restrain myself from getting arrested that night on behalf of the headline band. Still can't believe the cheek and lack of respect some 14 or so years later typing this.

&"?!*
That's just unbelievably disrespectful. I've never seen or heard of anything like that happening before. Just Beyond Belief. I hope word got around about that band and other bands and venues made sure they stayed away from them.

How did the owners of the gear react???
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  #30  
Old 04-03-2017, 02:04 AM
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Juniper Juniper is offline
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

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Originally Posted by Erberderber View Post
That's just unbelievably disrespectful. I've never seen or heard of anything like that happening before. Just Beyond Belief. I hope word got around about that band and other bands and venues made sure they stayed away from them.

How did the owners of the gear react???
I know, realised then why the drummer 'forgot' his own gear. The singers behaviour no doubt had something to do with that lapse in memory.

They left the venue pretty sharpish after their set funny enough so I don't think any major fallout happened.

Thankfully I never heard from them again on that circuit.
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Old 04-03-2017, 02:11 AM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

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Originally Posted by gwetschdwummer View Post
I've been asked to provide a kit for a gig my band is doing that other bands on the bill will be using.
I would politely tell whomever asked that no one will be playing on my instrument. If it means I'm not doing the gig, so be it. It's just not worth it and it also means that the sound will be horrible since there are probably three or four bands on the bill. Who wins in the end? The club, and no one else.
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Old 04-03-2017, 03:40 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

I do a lot of multi band gigs.

Etiquette here (UK) tends to be you bring your own 'breakables', ie. Cymbals, snare, pedals, often stands.

I will often offer, to save time, if there is a band on before us, to let them use my cymbals, but they've never so far been used. I think it's something most drummers are concerned about that they won't risk damaging.

Last weekend we 'headlined' (which actually just means we were on last) a gig up in Workington with three other bands. They used my gear in line with the above. All three drummers came over and thanked me. Which is the way it all should be.

It works over here. Frankly I'm not precious about my drums or cymbals or, indeed, anything particularly material I own. They aren't THAT important. Anyone who thinks they ARE, will change their view in time.
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Old 04-03-2017, 11:46 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

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Originally Posted by SquadLeader View Post
...Frankly I'm not precious about my drums or cymbals or, indeed, anything particularly material I own. They aren't THAT important. Anyone who thinks they ARE, will change their view in time.
You care when you look at the years loss/gain ratio.

The material things allow me to get to the next gig.

Its not about being precious...its about being a business man vrs a door mat.
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Old 04-03-2017, 11:58 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

95% of other drummers will respect your gear.

For me it's not too difficult. If I'm the only one who will be playing on my gear, I take my "A" gear.
If other drummers will be using my gear I'll take my "B" gear.
In the last three years I only had one guy slightly abuse my gear. It was my B gear. No big deal.


.
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Old 04-04-2017, 12:09 AM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

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Originally Posted by Otto View Post
You care when you look at the years loss/gain ratio.
Weird statement for me to read.

By not being a jerk and sharing my stuff, I've gained new friends, respect, and been part of a system that I can also take advantage of when I'm not headlining, or we're playing somewhere that has a pain in the butt load in or parking situation. Let alone that we don't have to wait for multiple drummers to setup everything and have longer changeovers or more work for the sound guys because someone thinks their stuff is more important than everyone else's and nobody can touch it.

Safe to say our priorities are opposite each other. I have no reason to include my drums in any "gain/loss" chart because it's just stuff, and not that important. Frankly, if I ever got to a point where it seems like a good idea to chart that, including depreciating my drums because there's a scuff from a kit-share, I would feel the need to re-evaluate what was important in life.

I mean, cool, if I get anal about it and never share them out, I'll have perfect drums, but so what? Who cares? Me? LOL.

Lastly, a "you break, you buy" policy is pretty standard around here(outside of heads/sticks), so I wouldn't even likely be out anything. Then you've got the step brothers who would rub their junk on your kit out of spite as well!
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Old 04-04-2017, 12:50 AM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

A friend of mine had a issue at this years SXSW festival. He showed up with his breakables, and the guy still wanted $75 to use the backline kit. And more for the bass amp. That's not the norm, as just about everywhere during SWSX uses a backline, most of the time with no real drama. Still, a crappy thing to exploit, imo.
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Old 04-04-2017, 03:17 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

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Originally Posted by Dr_Watso View Post
Weird statement for me to read.

By not being a jerk and sharing my stuff, I've gained new friends, respect, and been part of a system that I can also take advantage of when I'm not headlining, or we're playing somewhere that has a pain in the butt load in or parking situation. Let alone that we don't have to wait for multiple drummers to setup everything and have longer changeovers or more work for the sound guys because someone thinks their stuff is more important than everyone else's and nobody can touch it.

Safe to say our priorities are opposite each other. I have no reason to include my drums in any "gain/loss" chart because it's just stuff, and not that important. Frankly, if I ever got to a point where it seems like a good idea to chart that, including depreciating my drums because there's a scuff from a kit-share, I would feel the need to re-evaluate what was important in life.

I mean, cool, if I get anal about it and never share them out, I'll have perfect drums, but so what? Who cares? Me? LOL.

Lastly, a "you break, you buy" policy is pretty standard around here(outside of heads/sticks), so I wouldn't even likely be out anything. Then you've got the step brothers who would rub their junk on your kit out of spite as well!
Still, a head change on a 5 pcs kit is around 100$ here in Canada, without bass drum of course. I had a hard hitting 6'5 2B wielding basher go through a good bass drum head and dented every other head at a show, cost me more than 160$.

He did give me a bit of cash after our bassist asked him seeing my "I'm so friggin pissed off but keeping my composure for the team" face, which was ackward as I wanted to go the doormat way and simply accept the loss and get on with my life. But yeah lesson learned : b-heads, b-snare, c-cymbals and a backbreaker throne as backup for the eventual heavyweight who forgets his.

If you don't have these in your car and the other drummer forgets his, you will be pressured into lending everything and you come off as the intransigeant one if you refuse.

The kit itself I do not mind providing, no bad experience to this date.

I don't mind the occasional break even gig, but pay to play is harder to accept.
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Old 04-05-2017, 07:15 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto View Post
You care when you look at the years loss/gain ratio.

The material things allow me to get to the next gig.

Its not about being precious...its about being a business man vrs a door mat.
I accept I'm lucky that I am so insouciant about material stuff.

I play music for fun, not for my livelihood. I accept it's different in the case of the latter.
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Old 04-05-2017, 07:19 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

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Originally Posted by Groov-E View Post
Still, a head change on a 5 pcs kit is around 100$ here in Canada, without bass drum of course. I had a hard hitting 6'5 2B wielding basher go through a good bass drum head and dented every other head at a show, cost me more than 160$.

He did give me a bit of cash after our bassist asked him seeing my "I'm so friggin pissed off but keeping my composure for the team" face, which was ackward as I wanted to go the doormat way and simply accept the loss and get on with my life. But yeah lesson learned : b-heads, b-snare, c-cymbals and a backbreaker throne as backup for the eventual heavyweight who forgets his.

If you don't have these in your car and the other drummer forgets his, you will be pressured into lending everything and you come off as the intransigeant one if you refuse.

The kit itself I do not mind providing, no bad experience to this date.

I don't mind the occasional break even gig, but pay to play is harder to accept.
It's not really a matter from my own personal perspective of being pressured...if another drummer had a problem, and I could resolve it by being helpful rather than being a tit, I'm gonna be helpful and not work out the +/- of a balance sheet before deciding to be so.

It's just the way I am. Totally accept that I'm risking being trodden on and that one day I'll be pissed because someone arses around with my gear and damages something. But, until then...
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Old 04-06-2017, 04:03 PM
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Default Re: Sharing kit etiquette on gigs.

Really interesting read!

I'm looking to take part in my very first pub jamming session and I'll be taking a drum kit to be used.

I've a couple of DW kits which I'm too precious over to share, but I kept my very first kit, a Pearl Forum Kit, for such occassions as I'll not mind who gets up and plays it.

I'm debating the cymbals and snare though. I usually play a Black Beauty snare with a DW performance series snare as backup, and Zildjian K and A cymbals. I'm not keen on sharing either the snares or cymbals.

However, the original cymbals and snare that came with the forum kit are pretty dire!!!!

Maybe I should take the ropey cymbals and snare the first time to see how the ground lies and what the set up is, and have decent cymbals and snare with me but in cases for if I'm the only drummer there? Or do I buy a cheap snare for such occasions.
Tough decision.
I'm not the best at pushing myself forward and so, depending on who turns up, might not play for long.
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