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Old 01-24-2017, 05:43 PM
Mitydrum Mitydrum is offline
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Default studio recording

I'm fairly new to the studio drumming world. I've been playing live professionally for over 25+ years and almost always use a metronome or click track when playing. I also always use a click track or metronome when practicing. I'm starting to find that I have a unique problem that I'm not sure how to correct though when I'm in the studio....

During my studio recordings lately my snare drum (left hand) is almost always slightly ahead of the beat and my bass drum (right foot) is almost always slightly behind the beat. Making quantization or beat correction "in the box" a bear to say the least.

Any suggestions on how I might line my left hand and right foot up? I've tried unison patterns, alternating patterns and nothing seems to be helping. Getting frustrated.....
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Old 01-24-2017, 06:12 PM
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ineedaclutch ineedaclutch is online now
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Default Re: studio recording

Try adjusting your grip and your placement of the pedal. That usually fixes micro-timing issues for me.
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Old 01-25-2017, 03:42 AM
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evilg99 evilg99 is offline
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Default Re: studio recording

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Originally Posted by ineedaclutch View Post
Try adjusting your grip and your placement of the pedal. That usually fixes micro-timing issues for me.
Yes, good ideas ^^^ to try....

1) Shorten your bass drum beater a bit, and also, make sure your beater isn't travelling past vertical. If it is, raise the resonant side of the bass drum a bit so that the resonant hoop is up off the floor a little. This shortens the bass drum stroke.

2) Hold your left stick a little further back....and maybe try flattening your snare a bit more, and lowering it a bit. This will lengthen your left hand stroke.

Small changes can make a big difference...go easy with it, let us know if it helped.
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Old 01-25-2017, 05:32 AM
Ghostnote
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Default Re: studio recording

Yeah, I raise the front of my bass drum just about as far as the curved spurs will allow. Looks a little odd, but it makes the footboard angle upon impact that much better. Just don't over-tighten the hoop clamp on your pedal or you might deform the batter hoop if you angle the drum that much.
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Old 01-27-2017, 04:40 AM
AudioWonderland AudioWonderland is offline
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Default Re: studio recording

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitydrum View Post
I'm fairly new to the studio drumming world. I've been playing live professionally for over 25+ years and almost always use a metronome or click track when playing. I also always use a click track or metronome when practicing. I'm starting to find that I have a unique problem that I'm not sure how to correct though when I'm in the studio....

During my studio recordings lately my snare drum (left hand) is almost always slightly ahead of the beat and my bass drum (right foot) is almost always slightly behind the beat. Making quantization or beat correction "in the box" a bear to say the least.

Any suggestions on how I might line my left hand and right foot up? I've tried unison patterns, alternating patterns and nothing seems to be helping. Getting frustrated.....
I don't understand why that would make quantifying any more difficult
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Old 01-27-2017, 03:40 PM
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eclipseownzu eclipseownzu is offline
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Default Re: studio recording

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Originally Posted by AudioWonderland View Post
I don't understand why that would make quantifying any more difficult
Right, hit replacement doesnt care if you are ahead or behind.

Another option, and IMHO the best one, is just dont fix it. Leave it as it is. Let the song breathe, and let your performance be what it is. just because you can fix it with the click of a button (or space bar) does necessarily mean you should. Not to sound like a jerk, but if you are way off the beat the answer isnt to fix it in the box, its to go practice to a metronome. If its just micro-timing issues I would say dont fix them. Most of the best albums ever made were made without hit replacement, so it definitely isnt necessary.
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Old 01-27-2017, 05:44 PM
JohnoWorld
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Default Re: studio recording

I don't think I've ever been right on the beat. If you are I think you'll just end up sounding like Superior Drummer and no-one wants that. Even the very best don't hit it right every single time, it's impossible

I think with the advent of these amazing technological advances, we are in danger of losing the feel and dynamics of drumming.

As soon as you put some guitar and bass over it, it doesn't matter at all, in fact it sounds better and more alive.

Perhaps just accept that you're not a machine, you're a good drummer and you use your limbs, not midi notes.

If it's annoying you though, try raising your drums, change your angles (as has been said)
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Old 01-29-2017, 07:41 PM
brentcn brentcn is offline
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Default Re: studio recording

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Originally Posted by Mitydrum View Post
Any suggestions on how I might line my left hand and right foot up? I've tried unison patterns, alternating patterns and nothing seems to be helping. Getting frustrated.....
A tendency to be ahead or behind the click (or, in your case, both at the same time), can be overcome, but you'll need to learn to intentionally play ahead or behind the click. Until you do that, you'll be stuck in your present habit.
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Old 01-29-2017, 07:58 PM
Push pull stroke Push pull stroke is offline
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Default Re: studio recording

I had this problem too, recently, playing some tricky independence exercises. I play heel up, and I found that keeping my heel very slightly higher in between notes sped up my reaction time with the right foot just enough. It was a tiny adjustment.
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Old 01-29-2017, 08:27 PM
brentcn brentcn is offline
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Default Re: studio recording

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Originally Posted by JohnoWorld View Post
I don't think I've ever been right on the beat. If you are I think you'll just end up sounding like Superior Drummer and no-one wants that. Even the very best don't hit it right every single time, it's impossible
Not every single time, no, but most pros are able to control their time to a very good degree. Sure, there may be a slight drift here and there, but for the most part kicks and snares will be right on the beat, if that's what's desired.

There's really no danger in you sounding like a machine. Your band will still need you to figure out what to play.
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Old 02-08-2017, 01:33 PM
Drummer_Sully Drummer_Sully is offline
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Default Re: studio recording

Quote:
Originally Posted by eclipseownzu View Post
Right, hit replacement doesnt care if you are ahead or behind.

Another option, and IMHO the best one, is just dont fix it. Leave it as it is. Let the song breathe, and let your performance be what it is. just because you can fix it with the click of a button (or space bar) does necessarily mean you should. Not to sound like a jerk, but if you are way off the beat the answer isnt to fix it in the box, its to go practice to a metronome. If its just micro-timing issues I would say dont fix them. Most of the best albums ever made were made without hit replacement, so it definitely isnt necessary.


Couldn't agree more with this. I spent many years frustrated that my playing was not metronomic, then eventually realised that it's the 'imperfections' that give a drummer their personality. The documentary Sound City by the Foo Fighters definitely clarified this for me.
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Old 02-15-2017, 01:24 PM
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WalterKohn WalterKohn is offline
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Default Re: studio recording

Quote:
Originally Posted by AudioWonderland View Post
I don't understand why that would make quantifying any more difficult
Depending on the mic setup it could make it extremely difficult due to bleed you get on individual and room mics.
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