DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussion forum for all drum related topics. Use this forum to exchange ideas and information with your fellow drummers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 12-20-2016, 10:42 PM
MoreBeer's Avatar
MoreBeer MoreBeer is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 531
Default What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

I guess about four months ago I bought a basic interface and a few condenser mics. I have since expanded that and added a mixer, a few more mics and like to play along to whatever and listen back to hear how bad, or hopefully good I might sound.

The biggest lesson I've learned is to improve my patience and timing. As listening to the recorded tracks I've discovered that "at times", I tend to get slightly fast and ahead of the music. Not by much, but noticeable. This would have not been perceived by simply playing to music with headphones without the ability to review the result.

Buying the modest recording gear setup has provided immense value to me and has helped improve my timing and technique immensely.

If you're a newbie or possibly somewhat more experienced, I highly recommend going this route. You just might be surprised what you discover!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-20-2016, 10:48 PM
Tamaefx's Avatar
Tamaefx Tamaefx is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: France
Posts: 712
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

I have a basic Zoom H1, great stuff, cheap and useful. I often record the band during rehearsal, really the best thing to do to improve. The quality is enough for us to catch the flaws and work on it. We record and then share via a Dropbox. It's easy now to do so.
Recording and listening ... And working = the best way to improve, and sometimes stop having illusions about our playing too !
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-20-2016, 11:00 PM
PlayTheSong's Avatar
PlayTheSong PlayTheSong is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 269
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

I highly recommend this practice - and I just use voice recorder on my blackberry. Don't need hi-fi to hear my mistakes! So don't think you need to spend money to reap the benefits.
__________________
Returned after 30 years. Now playing Gospel/Worship and Concert Band stuff - Big Band next?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-20-2016, 11:31 PM
IDDrummer's Avatar
IDDrummer IDDrummer is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: No longer in North Idaho
Posts: 5,162
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

That's awesome, MoreBeer. I agree, recording has helped me immensely.

Funny, when I started playing 40-some years ago I was taught by a jazz player. I tended to play light and quick. When I started playing rock I was encouraged by bandmates to dig in and play behind the beat. When I started recording myself I found I was actually dragging that backbeat! It took a while to find the happy medium and reprogram my limbs and my ears.

I encourage all players to record themselves now that the technology is common and affordable.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-21-2016, 12:55 AM
Destroyer772's Avatar
Destroyer772 Destroyer772 is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Maysville ky
Posts: 1,193
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

I totally agree MoreBeer, I have improved as a player, listener and hopefully Musician (If I may be so bold). Plus I feel like I have picked up another hobby. It's a learning experience, which learning something new is always a good thing.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-21-2016, 12:57 AM
No Way Jose's Avatar
No Way Jose No Way Jose is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Between the hi hat and floor tom
Posts: 807
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

I make recordings occasionally. Things sound different on the recording than when I'm playing.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-21-2016, 12:59 AM
Merlin5's Avatar
Merlin5 Merlin5 is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: London UK
Posts: 935
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Yep, couldn't agree more with recording yourself. Recording keeps your playing honest and ego in check.

I use the quick record on my e-kit. I play along to various of the built in songs but turn the click off. I then play back the recordings and turn the click back on to see where my strokes are landing. Mostly land dead centre with the click but always strokes here and there landing a bit behind, or even ahead which annoys the hell out of me. I'm totally obsessed with perfecting time and groove WAY more than working on chops. Whether I ever reach the pot of gold at the end of that rainbow, hmm, dunno!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-21-2016, 04:37 AM
AzHeat's Avatar
AzHeat AzHeat is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Mars
Posts: 1,444
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

I thought of myself as a much better drummer when I first joined this forum. I started watching some of the videos others have posted and while I've wanted to record my playing the past, it was never a priority. I've since acquired a simple mic setup and been listening to my drums while playing, which is huge for finesse, but recording my playing, which has been a very humbling experience.

It's been months and not a single recording worth posting. It seems the second the blinky light goes on, out come the slew of mistakes. I think I actually do play like that and just never noticed. I thought I at least had timing down, but I now find myself pushing and pulling. We play a lot of syncopated songs at church and it scares me to think how bad it may be going now.

Recording myself has ban eye opener, but it's also brought out the perfectionist in me and now, instead of being satisfied by thinking I know a song, I disect it. Definitely less board with song selections now. Absolutely nothing bad can come of of recording yourself, except quitting! LOL!!!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-21-2016, 02:17 PM
8Mile's Avatar
8Mile 8Mile is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Detroit, MI
Posts: 3,833
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

There's nothing like it, is there? There are moments of cognitive dissonance where it's almost unbelievable that the drummer you're hearing is really you. It seemed so hip and tight while you were doing it, but the recording reveals a completely different truth.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-21-2016, 02:42 PM
JohnoWorld
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Recording my drums has taught me that I am shit and need to practice more, which I do now.

I then recorded my last jam with my band and learned some more....

https://deanjohnson1.bandcamp.com/album/reenable

....that I am still crap
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 12-21-2016, 04:25 PM
Dizeee's Avatar
Dizeee Dizeee is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 402
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Recording has taught me I'm far worse than I realised. When I started up again I thought I might be intermediate and a decent one at that. I have since realised I'm probably low beginner with poor timing and a cackling handed bass pedal foot. Hard pill to swallow when my hopes were high and there is so little time I have to actually play or practice.

I also find the minute I'm being recorded it's just negative and shaky. Every decent beat is forgotten and every skewed beat rings in your head like an alarm bell... sending you further off course.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-21-2016, 05:11 PM
PlayTheSong's Avatar
PlayTheSong PlayTheSong is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 269
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

From the comments above it seems like there's a danger that recording one's self playing may lead to serious discouragement.

There's a better way to look at it though. So many people ask how they can know which aspect of their drumming needs the most work, and what they should focus on when they're practicing. Recording yourself provides that info in spades.

And since drummers are notorious for their egos, it's probably a good thing to have a tool that shows us how far from perfect we really are.

Humbler drummers are a gift to the music world!!
__________________
Returned after 30 years. Now playing Gospel/Worship and Concert Band stuff - Big Band next?
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-21-2016, 05:26 PM
JohnoWorld
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

fair point, maybe playing in front of a mirror would be best first (in order to check technique) then record when happy with that.

What I found was that my left arm barely moves, it's all in the wrists and fingers, yet my right arm is much more expressive. Not surprisingly since I've had 3 ops on the left and only 1 on the right.

Even just a go-pro in the corner of a practice room is a help. When i practice I mainly improvise though so it's not always going to be right on the money.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12-21-2016, 09:20 PM
KamaK KamaK is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: East Coast
Posts: 5,686
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by PlayTheSong View Post
From the comments above it seems like there's a danger that recording one's self playing may lead to serious discouragement.
One day you're going to have to face
A deep dark truthful mirror
And it's going to tell you things that I still love you too much to say
--some Elvis Costello song


Recording audio is the single fastest path to improvement,, but you're right... It can be absolutely devastating to your ego and seriously compromise your self confidence.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 12-22-2016, 07:01 AM
Mart61's Avatar
Mart61 Mart61 is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 501
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoreBeer View Post
I guess about four months ago I bought a basic interface and a few condenser mics. I have since expanded that and added a mixer, a few more mics and like to play along to whatever and listen back to hear how bad, or hopefully good I might sound.
Interested to read this. I too have been toying with doing the same.

Would you mind sharing your set-up details?
__________________
Yamaha Stage Custom, Ludwig LM402
Istanbul Mehmet Sultan
Gibraltar
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 12-22-2016, 03:56 PM
Hollywood Jim's Avatar
Hollywood Jim Hollywood Jim is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 3,673
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Some very good posts here. Yes watching and listening to a video of your playing is hard on your ego.

I've been play for many years. I evaluated my playing last week and found that I am playing too many ghost notes.
It makes my playing sound too busy. Now I have to figure out how to remember this when I'm playing live..........

.
__________________
"To play a wrong note is insignificant. To play without passion is inexcusable." - Beethoven
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 12-22-2016, 05:02 PM
MoreBeer's Avatar
MoreBeer MoreBeer is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 531
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mart61 View Post
Interested to read this. I too have been toying with doing the same.

Would you mind sharing your set-up details?

I initially started by using a PreSonus Audiobox USB with two Audio Technica AT2020 condenser mics. The DAW is Studio One Artist. Its possible to get amazing sound just with the two mic setup as the AT2020's do a great job. Fantastic mics for the money.

One mic about 40" from the drums on the left side front and about 36" or so off the floor. The other mic about 20" in front of the kick drum, about 16" off the floor and offset to the floor tom side (not directly in front of the kick drum). I also angle the diaphragm on the low mic slightly upwards. Both mics are set horizontally. I've found this to be the best setup if using two mics.

Recently bought a Mackie ProFX8v2 mixer, a few more AT 2020's and a kick drum mic....nothing expensive, a CAD kbm412 for about $40. So we'll see how a 4 mic setup goes. Not using 4 condensers, the fourth one I bought for the audio of my instructional videos.

Although for just about anyone, I think the simple 2 condenser mic setup is all that's needed if just wanting to get a decent recording of your playing.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 12-22-2016, 05:49 PM
MoreBeer's Avatar
MoreBeer MoreBeer is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 531
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollywood Jim View Post
Some very good posts here. Yes watching and listening to a video of your playing is hard on your ego.

I've been play for many years. I evaluated my playing last week and found that I am playing too many ghost notes.
It makes my playing sound too busy. Now I have to figure out how to remember this when I'm playing live..........

.
I'm also guilty of playing things that aren't there. I've discovered that I'm notorious for adding hi hat accents that aren't there along with being too busy on the snare drum. Usually just adding an extra beat or two here and there.

Overall, this doesn't bother me that much as long as the playing sounds good, tight and in precise time with the music. What does eat away at me is when I start getting fast or sloppy. At times, I also tend to start a song too slowly and sort of catch up 15 seconds later. There again, not all the time, just occasionally.

Lately I've been playing to simpler songs with a very clear and defined beat to work on my timing. For instance, I played to Donald Fagan's Security Joan last night about a half dozen times and kept playing it back looking for where I might have missed something, gotten fast, behind, etc. This type of practice has been helping (I think). Its also the type of song I tend to get busy with and begin to add things to.

Donald Fagan Security Joan - For those not familiar with the song.

Last edited by MoreBeer; 12-22-2016 at 09:16 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 12-22-2016, 07:07 PM
Merlin5's Avatar
Merlin5 Merlin5 is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: London UK
Posts: 935
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

I've got what I believe is a useful tip for everyone that thinks they can't play in time. Record yourself and don't play the bass drum. Just play a beat of your choice with just snare and hi-hat with and without the metronome. You may be quite surprised, if not amazed, at how much more consistent and precise your backbeats are than you originally thought. If this is the case for you, and I find it's sometimes with the case with me, then what you've done is isolated a weak part of your playing, the bass drum holding you back, not in synchronicity with your hands. I don't mean the bass drum out of time so much as not pushing enough, we're talking nano timing here. Adjust the position of your foot on the kick pedal. I always remember Dave Weckl saying that he found his beats late if his foot is too far up the footplate.

That isn't the only reason though, it may be a case of working more on bass drum timing with the metronome. Recording limbs in isolation is a great way to really analyse where your weaknesses may be.

(I don't expect anyone to acknowledge my post, and after 80 posts of feeling like I'm talking to myself at DW, I've gotten used to it. :DD )
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 12-23-2016, 08:05 PM
philrudd's Avatar
philrudd philrudd is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 416
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

I record every single practice session with all of my bands and it's proven to be the single best resource I have for improving my playing. I had no idea how badly I was rushing songs until I started monitoring myself, and the improvement over the past couple of years (since I began recording myself) has been enormous.

And I don't use any kind of expensive or fancy set-up. I just use the voice recorder on my old iPod. The recordings sure as hell aren't press-worthy - lots of rumbling and crackle and distortion. But I can always hear my snare and bass drum, and it's easy to tell if I'm playing on-time or not. Funny how a good groove can make even a horrible recording bob your head. And if I'm bobbing my head, I know I'm playing it right.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 01-03-2017, 04:51 AM
Mart61's Avatar
Mart61 Mart61 is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 501
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Many thanks for the details - I'll go price them up now. :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoreBeer View Post
I initially started by using a PreSonus Audiobox USB with two Audio Technica AT2020 condenser mics. The DAW is Studio One Artist. Its possible to get amazing sound just with the two mic setup as the AT2020's do a great job. Fantastic mics for the money.

One mic about 40" from the drums on the left side front and about 36" or so off the floor. The other mic about 20" in front of the kick drum, about 16" off the floor and offset to the floor tom side (not directly in front of the kick drum). I also angle the diaphragm on the low mic slightly upwards. Both mics are set horizontally. I've found this to be the best setup if using two mics.

Recently bought a Mackie ProFX8v2 mixer, a few more AT 2020's and a kick drum mic....nothing expensive, a CAD kbm412 for about $40. So we'll see how a 4 mic setup goes. Not using 4 condensers, the fourth one I bought for the audio of my instructional videos.

Although for just about anyone, I think the simple 2 condenser mic setup is all that's needed if just wanting to get a decent recording of your playing.
__________________
Yamaha Stage Custom, Ludwig LM402
Istanbul Mehmet Sultan
Gibraltar
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 01-03-2017, 02:29 PM
larryace's Avatar
larryace larryace is offline
"Uncle Larry"
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In beautiful Bucks County, PA
Posts: 20,441
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

I've been recording myself since 2003, when I returned to music after a 20 year break.

I improved by subtraction. I surgically removed the things that bothered me, not replacing them with anything other than keeping the beat. Improvement by subtraction. It really worked for me.

You know when you see another drummer? You know how you say to yourself, this is bad, that's bad, that's good....with the recorder you can now turn your own critical ear back onto yourself. Any drummer who is not recording themselves are wasting time doing stuff blind and deaf. Record yourselves next time you gig and listen back later. When YOU hear a part of your playing that makes you cringe...that could be the biggest motivator there is. If you don't/can't hear your mistakes...you're in trouble. If you can hear your mistakes, take heart. Hearing your mistakes...particularly for the first time.... almost automatically corrects them, if you are conscientious.

I've been recording myself so long now...I mean every single gig....that now there is no more disconnect about what I think is happening compared to what actually happened. Well OK maybe a little, but really it's largely reconciled. When I first started, it was like I was listening to something I was never a part of....when I was. So yea, the recorder...I would not have the gig I do without it, for reals.

Merlin....that is one of the most helpful tips I ever read here, and IMO you are spot on about the feet needing metronome work. The feet are more sluggish than the hands generally speaking and warrant dedicated metronome practice. I'm going to re-visit that area again thanks to your suggestion, Thanks.

Wonderful suggestion.
__________________
Levis/Hanes/Timberlands/Custom made socks
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 01-03-2017, 02:42 PM
8Mile's Avatar
8Mile 8Mile is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Detroit, MI
Posts: 3,833
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by Merlin5 View Post
I've got what I believe is a useful tip for everyone that thinks they can't play in time. Record yourself and don't play the bass drum. Just play a beat of your choice with just snare and hi-hat with and without the metronome. You may be quite surprised, if not amazed, at how much more consistent and precise your backbeats are than you originally thought. If this is the case for you, and I find it's sometimes with the case with me, then what you've done is isolated a weak part of your playing, the bass drum holding you back, not in synchronicity with your hands. I don't mean the bass drum out of time so much as not pushing enough, we're talking nano timing here. Adjust the position of your foot on the kick pedal. I always remember Dave Weckl saying that he found his beats late if his foot is too far up the footplate.

That isn't the only reason though, it may be a case of working more on bass drum timing with the metronome. Recording limbs in isolation is a great way to really analyse where your weaknesses may be.

(I don't expect anyone to acknowledge my post, and after 80 posts of feeling like I'm talking to myself at DW, I've gotten used to it. :DD )
This is a great point. It's not always obvious what the problem is. The feet can make the hands sound off. I went through a period where I struggled to figure out what was off in my recordings and I eventually realized it was the bass drum. I had spent so much time working my hands on a pad that I had neglected my feet.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 01-03-2017, 04:00 PM
JohnoWorld
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by 8Mile View Post
This is a great point. It's not always obvious what the problem is. The feet can make the hands sound off. I went through a period where I struggled to figure out what was off in my recordings and I eventually realized it was the bass drum. I had spent so much time working my hands on a pad that I had neglected my feet.
I'm the same so my bass drum practice now goes:

RLR LRL over a 4/4 beat which helps me to play opposites over each other.

Difficult at first but quite easy quite soon to my surprise.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 01-03-2017, 04:16 PM
KamaK KamaK is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: East Coast
Posts: 5,686
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by 8Mile View Post
I had spent so much time working my hands on a pad that I had neglected my feet.
Quite recently, I began working on some hip-hop stuff, and this exact same thing became apparent. Been working on the right foot for the past month and the gains have been wonderful.

I also have a new appreciation of Soul Coughing, which was a surprise to me.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 01-03-2017, 04:22 PM
Midnite Zephyr's Avatar
Midnite Zephyr Midnite Zephyr is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Surf City, USA
Posts: 6,298
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Recording helped a lot at first, but now I just don't give a crap. I don't record anymore. Every time I do hear something recorded, it sounds fine to me for the most part.
__________________
Drumming for fun.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 01-18-2017, 03:22 AM
gregj410 gregj410 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 34
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Watch the first 3 minutes of this relating to the bass drum lead. This guy has the chops to back it up. I found this so helpful.

https://youtu.be/j1UCDHS8d1s
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 01-18-2017, 10:57 PM
MoreBeer's Avatar
MoreBeer MoreBeer is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 531
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

I've since discovered that my modest recording setup doesn't quite cut it. So now, I'll be going with 10 mics and a PreSonus StudioLive AR16. Already ordered the additional mics, stands and cables and have the digital mixer-interface on order as it's not in stock now from where I usually buy. Was going to wait until the wife was away to get everything but having it all delivered to my parents house. LMAO! My mom-dad at 80 years young are the coolest people I know.

The Mackie mixer is now being used exclusively on my iMac for podcasts and instructional videos for audio and effects. And I'll retire my PreSonus Audiobox to a Windows system to enable the use of a condenser mic for instructional videos I need to do on Windows.

My god....the spending never stops, does it? It's like a sickness ever since I got back into playing drums about a year ago from a long hiatus.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 01-19-2017, 02:39 AM
gregj410 gregj410 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 34
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoreBeer View Post
I've since discovered that my modest recording setup doesn't quite cut it. So now, I'll be going with 10 mics and a PreSonus StudioLive AR16. Already ordered the additional mics, stands and cables and have the digital mixer-interface on order as it's not in stock now from where I usually buy.
I hope you will share your knowledge on this set up. I have a very limited concept of how to mic my kit. I had a similar thought of using the presonus. Does that also do the actual drum recording or is is strictly for sound mixing?
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 01-19-2017, 03:18 AM
KamaK KamaK is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: East Coast
Posts: 5,686
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by gregj410 View Post
Does that also do the actual drum recording or is is strictly for sound mixing?
It is a mixer that, when plugged into a pc/mac, is a 16 chan interface (plus the 2 track stereo mix). At least.... that's how I interpret the manual.

http://www-media-presonus.netdna-ssl...N_14062016.pdf

I'd like to get my hands on one just to make 100% certain it can be a mixer and an interface simultaneously, or whether they step on one another in some strange way.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 01-19-2017, 03:31 AM
wildbill's Avatar
wildbill wildbill is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Midwest - USA
Posts: 6,650
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

This one gives a little more info about using it with a computer:

http://www-media-presonus.netdna-ssl...l_05082016.pdf
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 01-19-2017, 05:47 PM
MoreBeer's Avatar
MoreBeer MoreBeer is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 531
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

I've been looking more into the PreSonus StudioLive AR16 since ordering it and their documentation can be a bit confusing or at least contradicting at times. If glanced over quickly, it initially appears that true multitrack recording is only available when using the Capture 2 software included, and then exporting the tracks from Capture 2 into your DAW.

Although that's not the case. Each mono and stereo channel on the StudioLive mixer has its own digital send. So its not required to use Capture 2 for multitrack recording. It's possible to record every channel individually to Studio One or any other DAW, thus eliminating the need for an interface or needing to rely on Capture 2.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 01-19-2017, 05:57 PM
KamaK KamaK is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: East Coast
Posts: 5,686
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoreBeer View Post
I've been looking more into the PreSonus StudioLive AR16 since ordering it and their documentation can be a bit confusing or at least contradicting at times. If glanced over quickly, it initially appears that true multitrack recording is only available when using the Capture 2 software included, and then exporting the tracks from Capture 2 into your DAW.

Although that's not the case. Each mono and stereo channel on the StudioLive mixer has its own digital send. So its not required to use Capture 2 for multitrack recording. It's possible to record every channel individually to Studio One or any other DAW, thus eliminating the need for an interface or needing to rely on Capture 2.
Indeed.

I guess the only remaining question is if you can use it as a normal stage mixer, and simply plug in a laptop to capture raw tracks, or whether the USB capture in some way interferes with the function of the mixer (or vice versa).

It would be extremely desirable to avoid situations where the USB capture is post-eq, post fader, etc. The docs seem to be geared towards it being used as a mixer 'or' an interface, but details become sparse when operating as both.

Honestly, it is something that futzing around with an AR for 20 mins would answer. Perhaps I'll run to GC this weekend.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 01-19-2017, 06:38 PM
MoreBeer's Avatar
MoreBeer MoreBeer is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 531
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by KamaK View Post
Indeed.

I guess the only remaining question is if you can use it as a normal stage mixer, and simply plug in a laptop to capture raw tracks, or whether the USB capture in some way interferes with the function of the mixer (or vice versa).

It would be extremely desirable to avoid situations where the USB capture is post-eq, post fader, etc. The docs seem to be geared towards it being used as a mixer 'or' an interface, but details become sparse when operating as both.

Honestly, it is something that futzing around with an AR for 20 mins would answer. Perhaps I'll run to GC this weekend.

I would think the USB capture would be post EQ, as it appears to me this unit is basically a hybrid mixer-interface. So any adjustment to a channel is what you’re sending to the USB and main outs. There doesn't appear to be any option to feed raw data to the USB and EQ'd data to the mains. Although for the manner in which I’ll be using it and most likely the majority of others, that’s fine.

Last edited by MoreBeer; 01-19-2017 at 08:33 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 01-20-2017, 05:00 PM
MoreBeer's Avatar
MoreBeer MoreBeer is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 531
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Well, all my new recording goodies..... mics, stands, clips, cables have shipped along with the main piece, the PreSonus StudioLive AR16 shipping today from SW as they just now got them in and received an email it'll be on the truck this afternoon!

Should have it all by Wednesday but I'm assuming at least a week or so to get everything setup and comfortable using it.

My next adventure is finding some sort of compact, multi-level cart on wheels (nothing too wide or cumbersome) to hold the AR16 and the computer. I had this really nice mobile cart from Amazon, cost about $35 that was big enough for the small interface and the computer, and when using the Mackie mixer with it, I'd just plop that on a little keyboard seat.

Guess I have a little more shopping to do. LOL!
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 01-20-2017, 05:19 PM
JohnoWorld
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoreBeer View Post
Well, all my new recording goodies..... mics, stands, clips, cables have shipped along with the main piece, the PreSonus StudioLive AR16 shipping today from SW as they just now got them in and received an email it'll be on the truck this afternoon!

Should have it all by Wednesday but I'm assuming at least a week or so to get everything setup and comfortable using it.

My next adventure is finding some sort of compact, multi-level cart on wheels (nothing too wide or cumbersome) to hold the AR16 and the computer. I had this really nice mobile cart from Amazon, cost about $35 that was big enough for the small interface and the computer, and when using the Mackie mixer with it, I'd just plop that on a little keyboard seat.

Guess I have a little more shopping to do. LOL!
Good luck fella, the shopping never ends now you've started :-)
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 01-20-2017, 06:15 PM
Hewitt2's Avatar
Hewitt2 Hewitt2 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Deep in the Groove
Posts: 318
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

what do you guys record? Entire practice sessions, or just snippets based on major areas of focus?

It's hard enough finding the time to practice. Finding the time to listen to myself practice adds another layer of complexity!
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 01-20-2017, 06:19 PM
Dr_Watso's Avatar
Dr_Watso Dr_Watso is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 6,338
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hewitt2 View Post
what do you guys record? Entire practice sessions, or just snippets based on major areas of focus?

It's hard enough finding the time to practice. Finding the time to listen to myself practice adds another layer of complexity!
I like to record myself once I feel I've "got it". Usually there's something I want to fix but I don't know it till I hear.

Lots of guys record everything, and I've even had bands that recorded full practice sessions each time... Thing is, I rarely listened to all that.
__________________
"I always wanted to be remembered for; being honest. Nothing else is worth a damn." - Lemmy
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 01-20-2017, 11:34 PM
MoreBeer's Avatar
MoreBeer MoreBeer is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 531
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hewitt2 View Post
what do you guys record? Entire practice sessions, or just snippets based on major areas of focus?

It's hard enough finding the time to practice. Finding the time to listen to myself practice adds another layer of complexity!
I just record myself playing to an MP3 or a bass track I laid down along with possibly some guitar of my own. I play for my enjoyment and get a kick out of hearing the results. Nothing serious or professional. I'm an older guy, 56 who has played almost my entire life just for the enjoyment of playing.

Last edited by MoreBeer; 01-21-2017 at 06:17 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 01-23-2017, 01:34 PM
uniongoon's Avatar
uniongoon uniongoon is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: caesarea over looking the lake southern ontario
Posts: 1,370
Default Re: What Recording My Drum Playing Has Taught Me

I just bought a Zoom Q4. I love it. I have been recording my live band performance for years, with the Zoom and the headphone jack, it makes it so easy to quickly review, so now I record my practicing too.
I have a love hate relationship with my playing. Playing with a band is what I do best, by myself, I seem to fall on my face constantly. Mostly I think because I am bored with my own playing so I continually try to jump into stuff I have not really learned or worked on. So recording this is helping me immensely.
__________________
See my Signia's
http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...ad.php?t=73869
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com