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  #1  
Old 12-11-2016, 03:05 AM
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Default After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/...ticle33175055/

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Earlier this year, Ulrich attended this year’s Desert Trip, a three-day festival in the California desert featuring Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones, Neil Young, Paul McCartney, the Who and Roger Waters. “Did you notice the drummers?” Ulrich asks. “Only one of them was still an original.”

I hadn’t thought of it, but it’s true. Charlie Watts from the Stones is still keeping time at the age of 75, but the Who’s drummer, for example, is Zak Starkey, the second-generation son of drummer Ringo Starr. “If every singer at Desert Trip was 70 and change,” Ulrich says, “only one drummer was in his 70s.”

The attrition of drummers, Ulrich continues, “It is a real thing.”
Click to read the whole article.
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Old 12-11-2016, 03:53 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

I've said this for years. We are akin to athletes in that the eventual wearing down of our bodies and synapses forces changes in our playing as we age. At some point we are no longer capable of being who we once were. Singers suffer from the same thing equally if not more. Very few of the great ones can keep their range and/or tone past a certain age.
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Old 12-11-2016, 05:23 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

A lot depends on technique. The less damaging your technique is to your body, the longer you can play. Genes and nutrition play big roles too. I've been able to control my repetitive strain problems with magnesium supplements and correcting my technique.
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Old 12-11-2016, 08:35 AM
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Default Roy Haynes at 91 - Central Park 2016

Roy must have the genetics and the technique!
91 and going strong!

https://youtu.be/VEU_mX7dvJk
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  #5  
Old 12-11-2016, 10:42 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

I think music keeps you as young as you are able to be, especially in old age. My band leader just turned 70. All he seems to know is music. That guy will play until he drops, I think it's all he knows, I can't recall him talking about anything but. But he is a lot better off than every other 70 year old I know. He even survived chemo. How many people kick cancer? That took a toll though, the chemo. He was just telling me about that last night.

Music, if you are genuinely into it and work it...it's great for brain plasticity. Which keeps you young in the mind. Which is about the best you can ask for in old age. Nothing lights up all different areas of your brain like playing drumset.
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Old 12-11-2016, 02:04 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

I would like to know how many people have been affected by back issues due to repetitive playing sat down for years.

I am 34 and combining the 5 years of playing when I was younger to my current bout of 7 weeks, my back is already screwed with a disc herniation and other muscular consequential strains. Most of that comes from a seated day job in a car but still, it can't be helped by slouching in front of a kit.
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Old 12-11-2016, 02:17 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

My technique when I was younger was very hard on my wrists, but I've corrected that now. My job as an electrician however, is what will eventually end my playing days. My wrists, shoulders, hips, and knees are all taking a s#!tkicking at work and my right wrist gets so bad at times that I fear carpal tunnel surgery is not far off. I also have scar tissue due to a work related muscle tear in my shoulder that presses on a nerve in my upper back/shoulder area. When it acts up, it sets off a chain reaction which affects my right shoulder/upper back, right elbow, right wrist, and the fingers on my right hand can be cracked every 5 mins due to constant seizing up. Not very pleasant. I'm 46 now. I can only just imagine what I'll be like when I'm 65.
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Old 12-11-2016, 03:16 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

Yup, I definitely don't play like I'm 20 anymore. I like to think that I play BETTER than I did, but I'm not exactly Captain Caveman behind the kit anymore. I used to be a real basher. Now at age 42, I play music that doesn't require me be a basher, but I can still light a place up when I need to.

My back has been giving me trouble for a solid 3-4 years now. It all started when I moved a couple of cast iron fireplace inserts in and out of our fireplaces. That lead to a 6-week recovery while using a chiropractor and massage therapist. My back hasn't been right since. Since then, I have moved to smaller drums (Used to do the 22", 16", 12" setup. Now, I backed down to a 20" kick in a gig bag). I have a desk job, and at work, I have been able to get one of those stand-up desks which has helped tremendously!

With that said, I absolutely hate the load-in/load-out process these days. Our band is starting to get more popular and playing more outdoor shows; however, we have to supply the PA system. We are looking at getting subs this year (hopefully!), but I already dread it because not only am I the drummer, but I'm the PA guy too.

Playing drums really doesn't hurt me; it's all of the other crap surrounding playing drums that makes me ache. For right now, it's still worth it...and I hope I can say the same 20 years from now. I try my best to enjoy every gig.
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  #9  
Old 12-11-2016, 04:32 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

I suspect most of those old rocker drummers spent many years trying to pollute themselves with vice and sloth.

I've been playing on a drumset since I was 12 and now I'm almost 53.
I have only one health issue related to drumming. I have Raynauds in my hands and it's very bad. Some newer research seems to think it's not from repetitive hand trauma any more and that it's just genetic, so I can't assume with full confidence that it's purely from drums.

I had to have the doctor send me to a nutritionist for me to get off my ass and learn to move and eat properly.
I'm now in the best fitness of my life ever - and it's tragic watching my peers.
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  #10  
Old 12-11-2016, 05:54 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

Been playing drums in bands for 46 years with no health issues. I had plenty of blisters early on but better technique sorted that. I should imagine bass players having more back problems than drummers. A heavy weight on one shoulder is not good for posture. Guitarists dont suffer the same problems, of course, as the chip on there other shoulder balances things up.
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Old 12-11-2016, 06:02 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

If you played for years and years with bad technique, playing overhard because of amps cranked to 11, I bet your body is broken now.

Not that lessons and volume control are necessarily a panacea for these issues, but they certainly can't hurt.

As a 44-year-old drummer who used to do all the wrong things (including jumping out of planes carrying my own body weight in equipment, then carrying it up the side of a mountain), I am doubly mindful of what I put my body through. I have several herniated discs, an ankle that spontaneously seems to sprain, and a left arm that goes in and out of functionality (imagine trying to play with your fingers gone completely numb).

I don't need drumming to add to my list of woes; I need it to remedy that which ails me. I went back and reexamined my posture, my grip, the ergonomics of my kit, and even my balance between the throne and my pedals.

Drumming is very rarely a hardship for me any more, and as a result it's twice as fun.
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  #12  
Old 12-11-2016, 06:40 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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Originally Posted by alparrott View Post
If you played for years and years with bad technique, playing overhard because of amps cranked to 11, I bet your body is broken now.

Not that lessons and volume control are necessarily a panacea for these issues, but they certainly can't hurt.

As a 44-year-old drummer who used to do all the wrong things (including jumping out of planes carrying my own body weight in equipment, then carrying it up the side of a mountain), I am doubly mindful of what I put my body through. I have several herniated discs, an ankle that spontaneously seems to sprain, and a left arm that goes in and out of functionality (imagine trying to play with your fingers gone completely numb).

I don't need drumming to add to my list of woes; I need it to remedy that which ails me. I went back and reexamined my posture, my grip, the ergonomics of my kit, and even my balance between the throne and my pedals.

Drumming is very rarely a hardship for me any more, and as a result it's twice as fun.
46 years of drumming, and I played in heavy rock bands, is a piece of cake when you do a hard manual job 40 hours a week and train every day as an endurance runner. It depends on how big or small your comfort zone is.
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  #13  
Old 12-11-2016, 06:46 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

I was starting to have wrist problems playing heavier music. You know, that electric shock kind of pain in the wrist. Luckily I'm playing softer music now and have been pain-free so I can keep playing all night no problem. I'm very greatful that I can keep doing what I love without damaging my body just by playing different music.

Lars unfortunately doesn't have that luxury. He has to go out there and give a Metallica level peformance every gig which must be pretty tough sometimes. I know my wrists would beg for mercy before the half way point.

My hat is off to him just for that.
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Old 12-11-2016, 07:21 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

I'm 49, and have done weekend bar gigs for 25 years. My back gets sore lugging around the hardware bag, and my knees ache pretty good after a gig. I can just imagine what sort of chronic pain 25 years of playing metal in stadiums would have on your body.

And style of music is huge in the damage to the body. What kind of shape are todays blast beat style drummers going to be in in 20 years. Still playing that style? They can't exactly go find a jazz gig.

It was a very interesting article. It shined some light on some things I've wondered about as I got older.
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  #15  
Old 12-11-2016, 08:02 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

I'm 61. I have been injecting testosterone for about ten years. It keeps my bones, joints, muscles and tendons strong so that I can continue playing. I can do this because I have type II diabetes which is a catabolic disease, and causes my testosterone level to drop to the point that I have a deficiency anyway, so getting a prescription is no problem. Probably without it, drumming would be much more difficult at my age. There may be some risks, but I feel that the benefits far outweigh them. I also have a work-related back injury that I treat with medical marijuana and prescription painkillers. So I won't stop playing anytime soon.....

But I also have ringing in the ears ALL the time, you just have to get used to it or you'll go "barmey"...and when I listen to music, the tv, etc., I have to turn the treble WAY up, or everything sounds muffled.

I also mike my kit ALL the time, even in small clubs, because it's like driving a car with power steering and brakes as opposed to being without all that, I want my hits to come through without having to use really big sticks and pound hard. If you're playing with amplified guitars, etc., it just makes sense. It takes a bit more work, but it's well worth it.

Last edited by funkutron; 12-11-2016 at 08:08 PM. Reason: add
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  #16  
Old 12-11-2016, 09:08 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

When you sit at the drums, you shouldn't slouch. I used to slouch too. I'm lucky in that I always had a strong back. But my posture sucked when sitting and walking. I've since learned that your ears should line up with your shoulders, hips, and knees when standing, and when sitting I purposely push my lumbar area forward. It's just good posture. It looks better, because it is better.

Also an inversion table is a beautiful thing. When I come home from a long hard day working electric, I'm compressed. A few minutes upside down and like magic, I feel 86% better :)
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Old 12-11-2016, 09:28 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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Originally Posted by larryace View Post
When you sit at the drums, you shouldn't slouch. I used to slouch too. I'm lucky in that I always had a strong back. But my posture sucked when sitting and walking. I've since learned that your ears should line up with your shoulders, hips, and knees when standing, and when sitting I purposely push my lumbar area forward. It's just good posture. It looks better, because it is better.

Also an inversion table is a beautiful thing. When I come home from a long hard day working electric, I'm compressed. A few minutes upside down and like magic, I feel 86% better :)
Nice but expensive. A top pro physio gave me a set of spine stretching exercises that make that expenditure un necessary. I never have any back issues, despite the fact I damaged my back at work, hence the the visit to the physio.
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Old 12-11-2016, 10:18 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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Originally Posted by PorkPieGuy View Post
With that said, I absolutely hate the load-in/load-out process these days. Our band is starting to get more popular and playing more outdoor shows; however, we have to supply the PA system. We are looking at getting subs this year (hopefully!), but I already dread it because not only am I the drummer, but I'm the PA guy too.
I've been in bands where each of the band members were responsible for transporting part of the PA to and from gigs. Every member was supposed to supply their own mics or other inputs to the PA and their own mic stands.
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Old 12-11-2016, 10:25 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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Nice but expensive. A top pro physio gave me a set of spine stretching exercises that make that expenditure un necessary. I never have any back issues, despite the fact I damaged my back at work, hence the the visit to the physio.
Good that you found your own answers. Back health/strength is key.

A quick check at Amazon has inversion tables from between 100 to 200 dollars.

It's harder than you think to be upside down. I can only take it for maybe 5 minutes tops.

But that's all I need to uncompress.
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Old 12-11-2016, 10:53 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

It's not just hard rock drummers.

I used to think I'd gladly cut off my small toe with a rusty knife to have just 1/4 of Weckl's technique, so it was quite interesting to read he too had suffered his share of injuries

http://podestasportsmedicine.com/tip...at-i-know-now/

Quote:
Dave Weckl:

For example, I used to play my main ride cymbal pretty high to the right of the second rack tom on the bass drum. This positioning was necessary to attain the clearance necessary to hit the rack tom cleanly, and still be able to get to the ride.

The problem is that it caused me to have my arm up in the air, thus crunching my shoulder against my neck. This caused nerves to eventually get pinched, causing numbness in the fingertips and hands – eventually leading to my hands freezing up.

-----
I was eventually told that this was due to ‘repetitive motion’, and later, the 5th vertebrae hitting nerves due to being out of place. I was also told this was caused by being in the wrong position for too long, including when I slept, but especially when I played the drums.

---------
My biggest problem now is an arthritic thumb in my left hand. I believe this condition, though partially due to heredity, is also due to playing the traditional grip far back in my hand for so long while slamming backbeats. This is something I don’t do now, and haven’t done for many years, but know has caused a lot of stress on my thumb for many years.
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  #21  
Old 12-11-2016, 11:09 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

The drum set hasn't been around all that long. And amplified music that requires the drummer to hit loud backbeats for a few hours at a time is even newer. The oldest arena rock stars are now in their 70s. There was no high-volume rock & roll before that. So we're just now learning what kinds of technical concerns drummers need to address to maintain longevity playing like that.
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Old 12-12-2016, 12:03 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

It's been sobering - but understandable - to see my favourite player, Neil Peart, 'retire' from the game.

For anyone who saw him performing at his peak in the 1980s, when he was in his late 20s-early 30s, he was a hard-hitting, non-stop, whirlwind of a player.

Now he's in his mid-60s, that kind of all-action physical performance for three hours night after night would be simply impossible - for him or anyone.

For myself as a humble bar band drummer who's passed the 50 mark, I can 'feel' it when I've done a hard-hitting gig - even though I've got hopefully decent technique. Sore hands, especially, these days. Then there's all the gear "humping" on top.

Today my band plays from time to time. 20-25 years ago when I would play at least three nights a week, I never "felt" a thing.
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Old 12-12-2016, 01:28 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

I never wanted to work that hard where I'm at capacity. I like the whole headroom concept. I go for overall creamy smoothness over the drummy stuff, so I feel I could go on like I am until the very end. Drumming is slowly getting more effortless the longer I do it. Except for solos, they are the bane of my existence lol.

I wouldn't want to be Lars, having to do all those drum parts that were a helluva lot easier when he was young, and had all that youthful energy. Also when all the success was new, you tend to want to perpetuate that, drumming to failure lol.
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:20 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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I never wanted to work that hard where I'm at capacity. I like the whole headroom concept. I go for overall creamy smoothness over the drummy stuff, so I feel I could go on like I am until the very end. Drumming is slowly getting more effortless the longer I do it. Except for solos, they are the bane of my existence lol.

I wouldn't want to be Lars, having to do all those drum parts that were a helluva lot easier when he was young, and had all that youthful energy. Also when all the success was new, you tend to want to perpetuate that, drumming to failure lol.
That's how I feel about it. As the Buddhists say, "The law of least effort"....more good things happen that way. Drumming should not only look effortless when it's being properly executed, it should BE almost effortless. Because as Human Beings, we're always trying to "force the issue"...one winds up getting in one's own way!

"Ever since we lost our innocence, we've been desperately trying to get it back" LOL!
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:40 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

I wonder how Tommy Aldridge is doing at the age of 66?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_F6UeuL9yw
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  #26  
Old 12-12-2016, 03:42 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

The key word here is Heavy.

I would not be surprised for any sledge hammer drummers to feel the toll later in life.

However, for the players who approach it as a musical instrument, there can be zero toll after a lifetime of play. Nothing but positive benefits.
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Old 12-12-2016, 04:49 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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The key word here is Heavy.

I would not be surprised for any sledge hammer drummers to feel the toll later in life.

However, for the players who approach it as a musical instrument, there can be zero toll after a lifetime of play. Nothing but positive benefits.
I agree, but the two guys specifically mentioned in the article, Phil Collins and Neil Peart, while somewhat heavy hitters were hardly bashers.

It's probably a good idea for ALL of us to think carefully and look closely at our own technique and ergonomics to make sure we aren't heading down a similar road. It's an easy trap to assume WE aren't hitting too hard and aren't doing any damage just because we don't have any acute symptoms right now.
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Old 12-12-2016, 05:29 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

Wow - I no longer feel alone now after reading Weckl's predicament. I suffer from the exact same thing, but I don't think it was caused by having my ride cymbal up high. The numb hands started to happen to me almost 20 years ago and I'd just deal with it. Now, my chiropractor is really working with me, as well as an acupuncturist, to help free-up these pinched nerves in my neck area, and it's really been helping. It's surprising what simple neck stretches and head rolling can do when you haven't really done them before.

I do recall an interview Peter Erskine gave when he complained about the posture issues of having cymbals high up and just about vertical (remember he played that way when he was the Jaco Pastorius big band), and he immediately went back to having things at a comfortable level. Nudge Chancellor still plays this way so it would be interesting to see if he suffers from the same thing.
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Old 12-12-2016, 06:17 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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I wonder how Tommy Aldridge is doing at the age of 66?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_F6UeuL9yw
He's barely aged in 30 years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank View Post
The key word here is Heavy.

I would not be surprised for any sledge hammer drummers to feel the toll later in life.

However, for the players who approach it as a musical instrument, there can be zero toll after a lifetime of play. Nothing but positive benefits.
So you think Weckl is a sledge hammer drummer?
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  #30  
Old 12-12-2016, 06:51 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

The article doesn't really go into why Lars at 52, is comparing himself with guys 20+ years older though. I don't know anyone, drummer or otherwise, with the same spring in his step that he had at 20.....and I sure as hell doubt there are many that are as physically sprightly at 70 as they were 20 odd years prior either.

But perhaps more telling, is why it doesn't even mention his two closest contemporaries. Both Dave Lombardo and Charlie Benante started around the same time as Lars. Both have spent decades playing similar styles of music. And neither seem to have any issues getting through their set lists due to the ache in their bones.

I'm sure they all feel a shade more weary than they did years ago. That's a given. But by the same measure, I don't see the breakdown of ability to be attributed to anything more than age. And you don't have to be a drummer to feel the effects of that. We all eventually succumb it.....with or without sticks in our hands.
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  #31  
Old 12-12-2016, 11:15 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

Drumming is a git for your back. If you don't sit right and play heavy, you will have issues.

On a recommendation from Mr Tomas Haake, I bought one of these - https://www.amazon.com/The-Pressure-.../dp/B0010B8CGM

and I haven't had any issues since.

I still have problems in my coccyx due to other muscoskeletal problems, but my back seems to be OK at the moment, or at least manageable.

I also find that using big fat clubs (2B) helps to minimise the impact on your body as well
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Old 12-12-2016, 02:28 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

I think a lot of this has to do with the evolution of rock drumming.

The pioneers had no techniques to learn, all self taught and learnt everything as they went along. No internet no youtube. Plus p.a's were not as powerful so to be loud you had to hit hard.

There was also a social side to it as well, and we're all invincible at 18.

Only as they got older did they think about technique the main examples being Neil Peart/Alex Van Halen. Their playing improved vastly as a result.

Charlie Watts is a Jazz man in a rock band. You have to have good technique to be a jazz player, plus he's never been a heavy hitter which would explain why he's still going strong.

Bobby Elliot from the Hollies is another guy from that era that is still going strong same as Brian Bennett both very underrated drummers. Not forgetting Mr Paice!
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:51 PM
Chollyred Chollyred is offline
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

Now that I'm approaching 60, I feel fine while I'm playing, but I really feel it the next day. The knees and ankles give me fits and the middle knuckle on my right hand. I suppose that's arthritis setting in. I have found that I do better now with thicker sticks (2B) than I used to (5A). I tend to drop more with the thinner sticks and the thicker ones help out with the volume.

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However, for the players who approach it as a musical instrument, there can be zero toll after a lifetime of play. Nothing but positive benefits.
One of my best buds played in the Marine Corps Band for years; hardly a metal bashing gig; but he had to retire due to repetitive stress in shoulder. I think good genetics have led to some of these guy's longevity. I met a guy in Chicago a few years ago that was still playing dixieland jazz and swing into his 90s.
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Old 12-12-2016, 05:34 PM
BruceW BruceW is offline
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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Originally Posted by DrumEatDrum View Post
To be accurate, McCartneys old drummer is still actively playing, just not with him :) I saw Ringo live in June, he played a two hour set, on the drums for much of it, and looked/sounded great.

I'm 53, and starting to notice leg cramping a lot more lately. I know quite a few working drummers in my area that are in my age bracket (or older) and they're still playing actively, so I have hope. Fortunately the speakers these days are smaller and easier to handle than the old days of bass-bins and big stacks and such...
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Old 12-12-2016, 06:41 PM
Chollyred Chollyred is offline
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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Fortunately the speakers these days are smaller and easier to handle than the old days of bass-bins and big stacks and such...
Yeah, we used to lug around a bunch of these things and a huge old Peavey powered mixer way back when...



Similar to this, but I think 12 channels...It was a monster!

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  #36  
Old 12-12-2016, 10:18 PM
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JosephDAqui JosephDAqui is offline
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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I read that and the other article in this thread with Weckl in it.

It's funny because I saw Weckl's dvd way back and totally took his advice on positioning the drums as comfortable as possible, kinda like driving your car.

The one mistake I made for the past 7 years was having my ride too low and flat although close to me (one tom over the bass drum) and having a 16" crash over the bass drum like Peart, that I ride on a lot when playing metal/hard rock. Those two mistakes messed up my right shoulder because I was "reaching" for both. Once my chiro was able to fix my rotary and shoulder issues, I looked at a vid of me playing, saw my mistake and positioned the ride where my elbow would still be at my side while playing, same goes for aux hihat, and moved my 16" crash to the right of my ride, over the aux hat so that same rule applies - no reaching up or out. (see pic below)

Since then I have had no injuries or pain and I play every day. band rehearsals are 3 hours straight twice every week, and I'm not suffering. Well, not yet anyway:) I exercise regularly, low fat, high fiber diet, plenty of stretching.

I can proudly say that I break a pair of sticks at every rehearsal and I'm still doing 140-170 BPM double kick metal beats/chops at full bore (16-32th notes every day for 30 min. practice routine) and I will be 50 in 3 months. I mostly play hard rock, funk rock and some metal. I'll keep it going as long as I can.

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Old 12-12-2016, 11:21 PM
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thebarak thebarak is offline
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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...... A heavy weight on one shoulder is not good for posture. ......
I know this was about bass-guitars, but this is why we drummers should all use backpacks rather than messengers, briefcases, or shoulder bags for daily carry. Just a slight body tilt can cause problems.
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Old 12-12-2016, 11:37 PM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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But perhaps more telling, is why it doesn't even mention his two closest contemporaries. Both Dave Lombardo and Charlie Benante started around the same time as Lars. Both have spent decades playing similar styles of music. And neither seem to have any issues getting through their set lists due to the ache in their bones.
Benante has been having carpal tunnel issues for the past few years. He has missed several tours. Jon Dette, Jason Bittner, have been subbing for him. However,when he is playing he sounds better than ever.
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Old 12-13-2016, 12:07 AM
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T_Weaves T_Weaves is offline
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

Just a word to the wise .......You'll find 60 is alot different than 50. I gig a couple times a month and thankfully not back to back. I can still pretty much play anything I want, just not as often. Time waits for no one. Some of the "fountain of youth" suggestions in here are quite amusing.
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Old 12-13-2016, 12:37 AM
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Default Re: After years of heavy playing, older drummers feel toll on health

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Just a word to the wise .......You'll find 60 is alot different than 50. I gig a couple times a month and thankfully not back to back. I can still pretty much play anything I want, just not as often. Time waits for no one. Some of the "fountain of youth" suggestions in here are quite amusing.
No, there is no "fountain of youth"...but the things I do work for me, I don't know if anyone else would go that far, but I'm going to drum until I die, not sit around and "veg" like my Father did. I'm here to drum and also to enjoy the "pleasures of the flesh"....LOL! and I intend to do it to the fullest.


"Live fast, die young, and leave a good looking corpse" -(I think that quote was attributed to James Dean, but I'm not sure!)
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