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  #1  
Old 10-27-2014, 08:50 AM
FooFightersFan FooFightersFan is offline
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Hi, I got an electronic drum kit about 2 weeks ago. What do I do now? I know how to play a basic beat and add a crash at the start of a new measure and when to do a fill (sorta) but other than that I have no idea what to do now. I joined this forum mainly because I'm not going to spend $30 for an hour of drum lessons. So maybe you guys can help out on what to do next? Thanks.
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Old 10-27-2014, 09:43 AM
KamaK KamaK is offline
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Default Re: Beginner

H there,

First off, welcome. We hope you enjoy playing as much as we all do.

Even though you're not looking to do lesson's, I'd recommend having a single private session for the initial set up and to give you direction. If you have a drummer friend that's willing to do it for half-a-six-pack or something, that works as well. What you need "soon".

1: Setup: While there's no real 'right' way to set up a kit, there's a couple things you can do wrong that will bite you later. Get help getting set up so you don't have to deal with it again and again.

2: How to hold a stick. There's a variety of ways to hold a stick correctly and a dozen techniques for having it make contact with the drum. Like number 1, there are a couple wrong ways to do it that will cost you in the long run and possibly cause injury. Again, have a teacher/friend show you this during the 1st consultation.

3: Sticking patterns. You need to be able to play singles, doubles, flams, and their various combinations. You need to play them in a variety of patterns and subdivisions. There are books (stick control) and online lessons that can take care of this. This is probably a third of your practice.

4: 8th note patterns on the kit. Grab a list of 8th note rhythms from somewhere. This is another third of your practice.

5: Around the kit and hand/foot. These are kind of like sticking patterns but around the kit. They get you doing fills, ad-libs, and tom based rhythmic patterns. This is the last third.

6: (Academic) You need to know very-basic music-reading and subdivisions. Quarters, eights, sixteenths, and their various triplets. You don't need to sight read or do transcription, but you need to be able to understand the things that other drummers are trying to communicate to you.

Once you get set up, Mess around with those things for a a few weeks/months and see where you stand. Periodically re-evaluate your need for personal assistance, especially if you notice you're getting stuck.
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Old 10-27-2014, 12:16 PM
FooFightersFan FooFightersFan is offline
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Default Re: Beginner

Thank you. That's a good list and it's really helpful. I appreciate it. :)
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Old 10-27-2014, 03:57 PM
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Magenta Magenta is offline
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Default Re: Beginner

Quote:
Originally Posted by FooFightersFan View Post
I'm not going to spend $30 for an hour of drum lessons.
May I ask why not?

I started with an e-kit, thinking "Well it's only hitting things, how difficult can it be?" - and it didn't take me long to discover precisely HOW difficult it can be. And that was when I started taking lessons.

Not only did I learn how to play drums, but having lessons gave me a real reason to practise. The more I practised, the more I learned, and the more I learned, the more questions I found I needed to ask - which my teacher was able to answer. So I learned more, practised more, asked more ... Rinse and repeat.

An added bonus is that through my teacher I met other musicians, with the result that I play in a band with two of his friends and his dad.

People on here will happily help you insofar as is possible, but don't be surprised if you get many recommendations that you find yourself a teacher :)
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Old 10-27-2014, 05:01 PM
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Default Re: Beginner

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Originally Posted by FooFightersFan View Post
I'm not going to spend $30 for an hour of drum lessons. So maybe you guys can help out on what to do.
I would be skeptical of such a low price too. The going rate in most areas is $25-30 per half hour. But check out the teacher's credentials. Maybe he/she is an accomplished performer but just starting to teach. That would justify the lower rate.

Jeff
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  #6  
Old 10-27-2014, 05:27 PM
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feldiefeld feldiefeld is offline
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Default Re: Beginner

Great to hear that you're getting into drumming.

I really do recommend that you take a few lessons just to get yourself on the right track. It may save you a lot of time later.....

I started taking lessons as a teen and I still do take several lessons a year. Of course, it's up to you....there is great information available now that wasn't available when I was a youngster.

However, there is SO much information now (perhaps too much) and because of that, it may be helpful to have someone you trust helping you figure out what information is helpful and what is a waste of your time.
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  #7  
Old 10-27-2014, 09:22 PM
FooFightersFan FooFightersFan is offline
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Default Re: Beginner

I don't think the drums is "just hitting stuff". I have a great respect for every type of musician. But I took guitar lessons and it ended up costing me around $500 to learn how to play like 3 songs. I ended up teaching myself music theory through books and now I have a great understand of how notes, chords, and scales work for a guitar. I understand a drum instructor could defiantly help but it's really not convenient and I'm in my last year of high school so I'm rather busy. Maybe when I'm done with school I'll save up my money for a drum instructor but for now I'll probably gather up my information through the internet and try to find a book somewhere. BUT I will defiantly look for one when I can. Thank you for the replies everyone. :)
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  #8  
Old 10-27-2014, 09:35 PM
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Midnite Zephyr Midnite Zephyr is offline
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Default Re: Beginner

Quote:
Originally Posted by FooFightersFan View Post
Hi, I got an electronic drum kit about 2 weeks ago. What do I do now? I know how to play a basic beat and add a crash at the start of a new measure and when to do a fill (sorta) but other than that I have no idea what to do now. I joined this forum mainly because I'm not going to spend $30 for an hour of drum lessons. So maybe you guys can help out on what to do next? Thanks.
Learn simple beats while you tap the quarter notes on your hi hat pedal.
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Old 10-27-2014, 10:18 PM
FooFightersFan FooFightersFan is offline
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Default Re: Beginner

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Originally Posted by Midnite Zephyr View Post
Learn simple beats while you tap the quarter notes on your hi hat pedal.
It's pretty difficult since I haven't developed that foot coordination so it seems like a good place to start. Thanks, man.
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  #10  
Old 10-27-2014, 10:26 PM
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Midnite Zephyr Midnite Zephyr is offline
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Originally Posted by FooFightersFan View Post
It's pretty difficult since I haven't developed that foot coordination so it seems like a good place to start. Thanks, man.
Exactly why I suggested that. I've been playing over thity years and just started doing that two years ago. I'm just now getting good at it.
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Old 10-27-2014, 10:48 PM
KamaK KamaK is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Midnite Zephyr View Post
Exactly why I suggested that. I've been playing over thity years and just started doing that two years ago. I'm just now getting good at it.
Early on, my instructor had me mimic a march while doing stick control on the pad. So while I was doing RLRL-RLRL-RLRL-RLRL, my feet would be tapping R--- L--- R--- L--- (and reverse), which really helped when I sat down to the kit.


I still pseudo march when working on sticking patterns.
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  #12  
Old 10-28-2014, 12:53 AM
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JustJames JustJames is online now
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Default Re: Beginner

Quote:
Originally Posted by FooFightersFan View Post
Hi, I got an electronic drum kit about 2 weeks ago. What do I do now? I know how to play a basic beat and add a crash at the start of a new measure and when to do a fill (sorta) but other than that I have no idea what to do now. I joined this forum mainly because I'm not going to spend $30 for an hour of drum lessons. So maybe you guys can help out on what to do next? Thanks.
Learn the basics of reading drum music. Tab is not music. It is useful for guitar, but dreadful for drum notation.

Learn to play songs that you enjoy. In pretty much every genre there are good songs that have relatively simple drum patterns. Seek them out and learn them.

Join/start a band. When I started drumming, I had my first jam as a drummer six weeks after I first picked up sticks. That basic drum beat will get you through an awful lot of songs!

Rethink taking lessons. If you're about to finish high school, I'm sorry to be the one to break it to you, but life is about to get busier, not less busy. I run a small business, have a family, work on renovating my home, cycle and play in a band. Taking drum lessons once a week forces me to have some discipline to my limited time on the kit and ensures that I continue to make some sort of progress.
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  #13  
Old 02-18-2015, 11:49 AM
COE_drummer COE_drummer is offline
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Default Re: Beginner

Quote:
Originally Posted by FooFightersFan View Post
Hi, I got an electronic drum kit about 2 weeks ago. What do I do now? I know how to play a basic beat and add a crash at the start of a new measure and when to do a fill (sorta) but other than that I have no idea what to do now. I joined this forum mainly because I'm not going to spend $30 for an hour of drum lessons. So maybe you guys can help out on what to do next? Thanks.
Well, these are all awesome suggestions. Let me say first, welcome to drumming. I certainly hope you enjoy this as much as we do. Remember that guys on this forum are a source of help and NO question is stupid. If anyone makes you feel that way, ignore them. We are all here to encourage, support and help in any way we can. There is no room for ego or attitude on this board. May I suggest getting some instructional video material. When I started back in the Cretacious Period (lol), they really helped a lot. I know an instructor or teacher is kinda out of your realm right now and that is totally understandable . . . life is life, man! Join up with a band, at least with a guitar or bass player. Playing with other musicians and asking questions is EXTREMELY helpful. It honed in my early chops pretty quickly. Talk to other drummers, go to local shows and study them. After they get off the stage, go up to them and ask them questions. I have been playing for a loooooooong time and I still do that. Whenever I play with another band at whatever venue, I am always front of the stage watching them. If they do something cool or did a new take on something, I go up and talk to them. If they seem like I can't really learn anything from them, I STILL go up there and shake their hand or encourage them. Getting into the local network of drummers is a GREAT way to gain a base of people that can help build your drumming. Study those rudiments and practice them every day, dude. I still do it. PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE! Never get off that throne until you learn somethin'

Last edited by COE_drummer; 02-18-2015 at 11:52 AM. Reason: typo
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  #14  
Old 02-18-2015, 09:54 PM
Boomka Boomka is offline
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Default Re: Beginner

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffwj View Post
I would be skeptical of such a low price too. The going rate in most areas is $25-30 per half hour. But check out the teacher's credentials. Maybe he/she is an accomplished performer but just starting to teach. That would justify the lower rate.

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