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  #1  
Old 09-03-2013, 06:14 AM
MrLeadFoot MrLeadFoot is offline
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Default Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

First, I have indeed been researching, and used the search function on this forum. ;-)

I'm not sure I understand the difference between the sampling and phrasing functions. Can some please clarify this for me?

FWIW, my interest in one of these was originally to replace a vintage Simmons setup that I have incorporated into my acoustic setup. Being that the Simmons brain I have only allows for playing it like drums, I THOUGHT I just wanted something more compact and included more kit sounds. But, now that I know that these Roland units will allow me to lay (or import) tracks, for lack of a better term, and playing to and/or over them, either on the pads or on the acoustics, I am seeing more options. Perhaps a backing track on another instrument could be helpful at some point on some material at a full-band gig or something?

I am aware that the SPD-30 has double the sounds now, with the new firmware flash, so I am wondering if I am better off with this model. Sampling is something I am not familiar with, albeit it may only be the term itself that I am not clear about. Phrasing sounds the same as Sampling, in my mind.

Also, can they both be used as "clicks", too?

I have read reviews where people said the Octapad's pads feel more "playable", and I am aware that the SX has only two external trigger options, while the 30 has 4. Does this mean I can actually ADD 2 and 4 external triggers, respectively? If so, I would think I can simply add my old Simmons kickpad for a kick trigger, and other pads as toms or something (if I wanted to), right?

If so, does that mean that on either model I can program each pad to have whatever sound I want? For example, if I select kit preset 42 on the Octapad, can I say I want the left bottom pad as the snare, the left top pad be closed hi-hat, the other 3 tops as cymbals, and the bottom 3 pads be toms? And do something similar on the SX?

Wouldn't that mean that I can also actually use either of these modules as a drum kit altogether, if I wanted to, for special applications, like maybe rehearsal, or small gigs, or whatever?

What about sounds? Can I have bass or keys sounds on the Octapad via a memory card/stick/... or via a flash of the firmware, or whatever? Or is that possible only on the SX?

I guess I want a drum pad first, with options to have backing "tracks" or loops. if possible, and have it be gig-friendly, as well as play it like a kit if I want to.

Thanks to anyone.
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  #2  
Old 09-07-2013, 03:05 AM
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rhumbagirl rhumbagirl is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

I have an SPDSX (or SPDS?) and too would like to know how to use it. It sits in its case out of sight and I forget I have it around :-) I have Ableton Live 8 and a Roland RD700SX piano that haven't touched much either, sadly.

I haven't searched for any SPDSX threads, but it would be nice to have a thread dedicated to that.

The only thing I've done with mine is record a two bar phrase on several pads then merge them and assign the whole thing to yet another pad, so that when I hit it, it would play all the parts together. I don't know if that's called sampling or phrasing. I'd have to look that up. Don't even know where the manual is, although I'm sure I can download it.

I see the advantage to all this as being able to perform live as a "one woman band" if you will. Definitely would be unique in that not many drummers are doing it. But rather than program the SPDSX via its pads, would be easier to play on the RD700SX, record it to Ableton Live, then download to SPDSX, assigning an entire composition to a single pad.

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Old 09-07-2013, 06:12 AM
MrLeadFoot MrLeadFoot is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

Thanks for chiming in here. I'm having a hard time deciding which one to get. The ability to trigger backing tracks with the SX is indeed appealing, but according to some info I've read, the Octapad is better as a drum module, and it's pads have a nicer feel. Maybe you can help clear that up for me. Can you actually play the SX like you would electric drums (albeit it's pad-based). Do they feel OK? FWIW, my current electric triggers are the vintage Simmons pads that are hexagonal, so I would think anything would feel better than those, although I hear the Yamaha Multi 12's pads are quite mushy. And, for that reason, as well as Yamaha's typical less-than-friendly interface, I am leaning toward Roland.
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Old 09-07-2013, 03:27 PM
wildbill wildbill is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

I don't use sampling that much, but with sampling like the SPD-SX has, you can connect a sound source directly to the unit and record those sources, from the 'audio in' connectors (LOL at HUGE stock pic):




With sample playback, you can load samples like from a thumb drive, but the unit itself doesn't actually sample. The Yamaha Multi-12 can do that.

Pretty sure with phrases, you hit record, then play the unit using the internal samples, and that recording can be saved and played back by hitting a pad.

I've got an SPD-30, which can do single or layered phrases, but not sampling or sample playback.
My Yamaha DTX-Multi can do sample loading and playback, and record (single, not layered) phrases, but not actual sampling.

If you want actual sampling, you'd have to get the SPD-SX.

About the pads, the Roland spd-30 can take 4 pads, but each can be dual trigger, so it can have 8 externally triggered sounds.
You could probably use your old Simmons pads, and they'd most likely work with at least one zone.

AFAIK - all pads on all units can be programmed to use any available sounds, and all can use clicks. With kick pad and hi hat triggers they all can be used as small kits.
I have my spd-30 and multi-12 set up as small kits.

You can't load keys or bass sounds into the spd-30, but you can use whatever is available from the stock sounds.
The Yamaha really excels in this area. You can load up to 4 layered sounds per pad and velocity switch between them, as well as a lot of other programming tricks.

As to feel, the spd-30 pads are firmer than the multi-12's pads, but I use the multi all the time with no problems. Can't speak for the spd-sx because I haven't used it.

I think that about covers the questions in your post.

But I strongly suggest that you download all the manuals to see which one best meets what you want. And if possibe, try them all out first before deciding.
Also a little general reading about sampling and sample playback/triggering would probably also be helpful.

Last edited by wildbill; 09-07-2013 at 03:43 PM.
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Old 09-07-2013, 06:08 PM
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

Great post and advice Wildbill, thanks! I have an SPD-30 and use it as an adjunct to both my Roland TD-9 electronic and Sonor acoustic kits. Wonderful percussion accessory and can be used with external kick triggers and hi hat controller pedal to provide a very portable and good sounding kit.

Croc
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Old 09-07-2013, 07:20 PM
Blackstone Blackstone is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

I have both the spd SX and the spd 30. Just to clarify a pervious post, the SX has no control switch for a hi hat like the spd 30 and the dtx 12. I love the SX for what I use it for which is for sampling and playing and having total control of loops and sounds, I would never attempt to use the SX as a mini drum set like I do with the 30. You really need a hi hat control. And you need to have velocity layered waves for a mini drum kit. Right now you really only get one sound per pad on the SX, even tho you can assign 2 waves to a pad, they both fire off together and there is no way around it.

I can't recommend the dtx because I've never owned one, but the 30 is great for a mini kit. But you can't import any new sounds, you need to make do with what sounds it has. Which is a lot, and a lot of ways to easily edit the on board sounds as well.
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Old 09-08-2013, 03:15 AM
MrLeadFoot MrLeadFoot is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

OK, so, it sounds like to "phrase" means to record something you're playing on the pads, while sampling is to playback a "sample" of an already existing sound or sequence of sounds, for example, a line in a chorus of a song (regardless of whether it is a vocal or instrumental).

That said, it would appear that in this context the term "phrasing" is really more like recording something for playback, more like "looping", correct? If so, then why the heck is it called a "phrase"? To me, a "phrase" is more like a line of the chorus like I described above, and recording that "phrase" for playback is one example of what you can do with "sampling".

I don't understand what "layered" means.

So, Blackstone, I'm not sure I understand why you need more than one sound, or "velocity layered" sounds, on a single pad in order to play one of these units as a mini-kit. Can you please elaborate here?

Wildbill, from what you said, it sounds like the SX is the ONLY unit of the 3 that can actually create "sample" sounds. Does that mean it can create a keyborad sound and bass and horns, as well as drum sounds? It that what you meant when you said "If you want actual sampling, you'd have to get the SPD-SX"?

That said, why did you get the Yamaha over the SX? Because of what Blackstone said about the SX NOT having hi-hat control?

Lastly, on this post, at least :-), it sounds like it's safe to say that all three fall short of what they really could be, in some way:

1) Wildbill says the Yamaha cannot record "layered" phrases, whatever that means (remember, I don't know what a layer is, but if that was pointed out, it must be significant).

2) In addition to being able to create and save sounds, the SX also can be used to emulate drum sounds when hitting the pads, but the included trigger inputs can't help provide hit-hat control? Sounds like that was purposely done by Roland, so the SX doesn't kill SPD-30 sales. Sounds like the same Horse Manure move Apple pulled when they purposely crippled the first iPhone by NOT including cut and paste, which is the very thing that put Apple on the map to begin with!

3) The Octapad sounds like it is designed specifically to be an electric-drum-kit-capable pad unit, which includes the looping, but in a more convenient, compact form factor opposed to having a brain and separate pads and stands, like a electric drum kit requires. The only reason this unit falls short is because it's SX cousin is almost the same thing but has sampling playback, so you end up wishing the Octapad had it, too.

I want a pad unit that, when applicable, can be:

1) Integrated into my acoustic setup
2) Played like a mini drum kit, at times
2) Can be used to playback samples, loops, and "phrases" of anything I want

So far, it sounds like the Yamaha comes closest to this. But before I think that is true, Wildbill, can you please elaborate on the limitation of only being able to record and loop single layers?
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Old 09-08-2013, 08:03 AM
wildbill wildbill is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrLeadFoot View Post
OK, so, it sounds like to "phrase" means to record something you're playing on the pads, while sampling is to playback a "sample" of an already existing sound or sequence of sounds, for example, a line in a chorus of a song (regardless of whether it is a vocal or instrumental).

That said, it would appear that in this context the term "phrasing" is really more like recording something for playback, more like "looping", correct? If so, then why the heck is it called a "phrase"? To me, a "phrase" is more like a line of the chorus like I described above, and recording that "phrase" for playback is one example of what you can do with "sampling".

I don't understand what "layered" means.

So, Blackstone, I'm not sure I understand why you need more than one sound, or "velocity layered" sounds, on a single pad in order to play one of these units as a mini-kit. Can you please elaborate here?

Wildbill, from what you said, it sounds like the SX is the ONLY unit of the 3 that can actually create "sample" sounds. Does that mean it can create a keyborad sound and bass and horns, as well as drum sounds? It that what you meant when you said "If you want actual sampling, you'd have to get the SPD-SX"?

That said, why did you get the Yamaha over the SX? Because of what Blackstone said about the SX NOT having hi-hat control?

Lastly, on this post, at least :-), it sounds like it's safe to say that all three fall short of what they really could be, in some way:

1) Wildbill says the Yamaha cannot record "layered" phrases, whatever that means (remember, I don't know what a layer is, but if that was pointed out, it must be significant).

2) In addition to being able to create and save sounds, the SX also can be used to emulate drum sounds when hitting the pads, but the included trigger inputs can't help provide hit-hat control? Sounds like that was purposely done by Roland, so the SX doesn't kill SPD-30 sales. Sounds like the same Horse Manure move Apple pulled when they purposely crippled the first iPhone by NOT including cut and paste, which is the very thing that put Apple on the map to begin with!

3) The Octapad sounds like it is designed specifically to be an electric-drum-kit-capable pad unit, which includes the looping, but in a more convenient, compact form factor opposed to having a brain and separate pads and stands, like a electric drum kit requires. The only reason this unit falls short is because it's SX cousin is almost the same thing but has sampling playback, so you end up wishing the Octapad had it, too.

I want a pad unit that, when applicable, can be:

1) Integrated into my acoustic setup
2) Played like a mini drum kit, at times
2) Can be used to playback samples, loops, and "phrases" of anything I want

So far, it sounds like the Yamaha comes closest to this. But before I think that is true, Wildbill, can you please elaborate on the limitation of only being able to record and loop single layers?

"... sampling is to playback a "sample" of an already existing sound or sequence of sounds, for example, a line in a chorus of a song (regardless of whether it is a vocal or instrumental..."

That's sample playback. To sample a chorus would mean to record it through audio inputs. Only the SX can do that. With the Yamaha, you could sample the chorus with a computer or something else, transfer it to a usb stick and load it in the multi from the stick.

"...I don't understand what "layered" means..."

Layered (in the context of Roland's 'phrase'), means you hit record, play the pads to record them, and then do it again to add another layer. (Refer to the spd-30 manual).

Yamaha uses the term 'pattern', to refer to recording something played from the pads. It can do this, and you can play the pattern back later by assigning it to and then hitting a single pad.
But you can't add an extra layer (pattern) in addition to the first one, without switching kits to get a different pattern.
(Refer to the Yamaha DTX Multi-12 manual).

Layered (in the context of layering sounds on a single pad) means to assign sounds that can be velocity switched. With the spd-30, you can layer two sounds, and with the multi-12, you can layer 4 sounds.
(Refer to the respective manuals).
You don't actually need velocity switched layers to use a unit as a mini-kit, but they can make it a lot more expressive and realistic sounding.


IMO, layered phrases and single layer patterns are kind of gimmicky. I tried them to see how they work, but never use them. That said, these are for home use. I don't play gigs.

Both the multi-12 and the spd-30 can use hi-hat pedals, but neither one reacts or sounds like a real hi hat. If you want real hi hat sounds and feel, use a real hi -hat.
(refer to the manuals to read about hi hat control).



"...I want a pad unit that, when applicable, can be:

1) Integrated into my acoustic setup
2) Played like a mini drum kit, at times
2) Can be used to playback samples, loops, and "phrases" of anything I want..."


Your choice for that is between the SPD-SX and the Multi-12. The spd-30 can't load or playback external samples.
(Refer to the respective manuals).

I don't know anything about the SPD-SX, or its ability to use hi hat control. You'd have to refer to its manual for that.



.

Last edited by wildbill; 10-30-2013 at 09:16 PM.
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  #9  
Old 09-09-2013, 04:27 AM
New Tricks New Tricks is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

The SPD SX is an expensive but awesome tool. I use mine to play short backing tracks (synth, horns,piano, guitar......whatever) live.

Simply record the piece, convert to a WAV file and load it onto the SPD.

I don't use any of the drum sounds so I have no clueabout them. Al I know is that it was exactly what I was looking for and there are only a couple things they could have done better.
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Old 09-09-2013, 05:36 PM
MrLeadFoot MrLeadFoot is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by New Tricks View Post
The SPD SX is an expensive but awesome tool. I use mine to play short backing tracks (synth, horns,piano, guitar......whatever) live.
Couldn't that have been done simply with a laptop, or is there some other benefit that it has that made you decide to part with good money? (Hope that makes sense.)

Quote:
Simply record the piece, convert to a WAV file and load it onto the SPD.
In this regard, is sounds you use it like someone would use the Yamaha, in that instead of creating the songs on the unit itself you create the sounds on something else and then transfer the sounds to the unit. Which brings up this: Can the SX hold enough to cover a 4-hour gig? For example, can you have, you load and play horns and keys tracks for 45 complete songs?

On that topic, Wildbill, the Yamaha says it has only 64Mb of ROM, so I can assuming it cannot even come close to holding that much, and in fact might only be able to hold MAYBE 10 songs worh of this. Is that correct?

Quote:
I don't use any of the drum sounds so I have no clueabout them. Al I know is that it was exactly what I was looking for and there are only a couple things they could have done better.
What are the couple of things that you think could stand to be improved?
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Old 09-09-2013, 06:05 PM
wildbill wildbill is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrLeadFoot View Post

...On that topic, Wildbill, the Yamaha says it has only 64Mb of ROM, so I can assuming it cannot even come close to holding that much, and in fact might only be able to hold MAYBE 10 songs worh of this. Is that correct?....

Right.

If you want it mainly to play samples, you're better off with the spd-sx, a computer, a cd/dvd player, i-pad, or some other new-fangled thing.
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Old 09-09-2013, 10:57 PM
Bobrush Bobrush is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

(velocity switched) Sample layering is important for getting realistic drum sounds. It means that when you hit the pad harder, it makes a different (e.g. louder) sound. If you don't have velocity switching and sample layering, then your drum pad is simply a 'switch'. It's like pressing the 'play' button, you always get the same sound whether you lightly tap it, or pound the hell out of it. However, if your goal is only to play backing tracks, then it is irrelevant, as in that situation, you effectively do simply want to 'press play'.

From the SPD-SX page (http://www.roland.com/products/en/SPD-SX/):"2 GB internal memory, enabling approximately 360 minutes of sampling (mono) without requiring external memory....you can house approximately 360 minutes of audio...Nine velocity-sensitive rubber pads, two external dual-trigger inputs"

From the Yamaha DTX-M12 page(http://usa.yamaha.com/products/music.../?mode=model): "64 MB Flash ROM for loading custom WAV/AIFF files...Maximum size Mono sample: 2 MB Stereo sample: 4 MB...Built-in pads 12
External inputs 5 (three-zone x 1; monaural x 4)"

Note that in addition to much less overall memory, the Yamaha also has a per sample limit of about 22 seconds. Could be limiting for backing tracks.

For backing tracks, or more and better drum sounds, you could probably use either unit (or older, cheaper, simpler units) as just a MIDI controller, hook it up to some far superior sample player/synth (e.g. a laptop with soundcard) and get whatever options you want. Way back in 1989 that's what I did. I still have my Ocatpad-II, although I'm not sure if it even works.

Quote:
With the spd-30, you can layer two sounds,
- that seems kind of lame to me in 2013. My Ocatapad-II from 1989 had three layer mixing or switching.

I seriously looked into both of these units some time ago, before deciding to get a full electronic kit, the Yamaha DTX-562. For me, I wanted something I could play like a real drum kit, but a real drum kit is out of the question for noise reasons, and you get some more flexibility and functionality with an e-kit.

If I had to choose between the SPD-SX and the DTX12, it would be a tough choice. The SPD-SX has a LOT more memory (which would probably sway me), but the DTX12 has more pads and more pad expandability and appears to be slightly cheaper.

Quote:
you create the sounds on something else and then transfer the sounds to the unit.
- I would generally recommend this approach. I used to have a sampler, and it was a real pain. It is much easier to use a DAW to create WAV files and then download them. "Sampling" sounds so easy, but, if you're trying to (re)create some kind of instrument, it is a lot of work to get good sound. If you're just recording a chorus, that is an easier task. In any case, having a full computer display, mouse and keyboard to edit on is really nice.
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Old 09-10-2013, 05:45 PM
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Hansolo Hansolo is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

I've mainly had experience with the Multi-12 and compared to the SPD-SX it has an advantage of 3 extra rim pads and 4 voice-layers per pad which help customize the drum sounds. It makes a useful practice setup with optional snare pad & pedals and would integrate easily with an acoustic kit.
I usually just practise with tunes on the iPod and I'm interested in using midi files for rhythm backing tracks. The specs refer to a max of 50 user- defined patterns/phrases that can be imported as SMF/midi files and use up to 896KB of user-pattern memory. The M-12 is supplied with Cubase AI 5 which can export standard midi files or there are plenty of midi song files available (which may need converting to Format 0). The midi files can be stored in groups of 50 on USB stick and imported as required.
Maybe Yamaha will be more generous with wave file memory in the next M-12 upgrade.

Last edited by Hansolo; 09-12-2013 at 03:05 PM.
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Old 09-10-2013, 07:16 PM
wildbill wildbill is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hansolo View Post

... It makes a useful practice setup with optional snare pad & pedals and would adapt easily to an acoustic kit.

Here's a short promo video showing integration (you can skip the ad in 5 seconds):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6YJY6feltk
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Old 09-11-2013, 02:12 AM
New Tricks New Tricks is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrLeadFoot View Post
Couldn't that have been done simply with a laptop, or is there some other benefit that it has that made you decide to part with good money? (Hope that makes sense.)
I would still need to somehow tryiger the backing segments


Quote:
Can the SX hold enough to cover a 4-hour gig? For example, can you have, you load and play horns and keys tracks for 45 complete songs?
Absolutely. I don't remember the specs but I easily have four sets of stuff on there now. I have 73 songs now. There are 100 "spaces" and I am planning on deleting the 17 factory installed percussion kits to make more room.


Quote:
What are the couple of things that you think could stand to be improved?
I'd like more remote triggers available. The pads are close together and are sometimes tough to hit consistently.

Also, each pad has a main and a sub so you cal stack two files on top of each other and the have separate volume controls but the subs won't loop.

And, I forgot which setting it was but, one of them was global and shouldn't have been.That was helpful, huh :)
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Old 10-30-2013, 08:56 PM
matchgrip1 matchgrip1 is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

I'm guessing that Mr. Leadfoot would be the full recipient of this info?? Anyway, I have both the SPD-SX and the SPD-30 Octapad. I have incorporated these into my DW acoustic kit, and I am still learning what they can do. The SPD-SX is an onboard sampler. You have PC software that comes with the unit, and you can load samples into the software on your PC (keys, drums, voice, cartoon tracks, anything) and then asign to the SPD-SX. You can name the group, and pull them up on demand. Foot controllers are also useful for that as well. The SPD-SX has quite a bit of technology built in, so the manual is important. If you need an intro sample for a live performance, the SPD-SX is the tool. You have full control of your samples when and where you need them. The Octapad is the really slick tool for adding to a kit. I have this incorporated into my acoustics, but I also use it with accessories (kick pad, V drum modue for my snare, hat pedal and hat pads) and I have a full kit when I'm doing a small three piece act or soemthing at a small engagement. I also use this with my full 6 piece DW kit when I want that killer electronic low end kick or some world tom sounds etc. This is the unit that you use the on baord sounds to "write a drum phrase". You set the click if needed, you set the signature, you pick the sounds you want, and then record. You can then record two addtional layers over top of the first, and have a full drum onslaught at your disposal. You can adjust the on board effects, and create just about any kit you want. This is what you use as a drum kit, or an addition to you existing gear, and it is quite useful. I can elaborate more if needed, but I hope this helps!
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Old 10-30-2013, 10:39 PM
MrLeadFoot MrLeadFoot is offline
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Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

Thanks for the info, thus far. Let me digest what you've shared first, then I will read it again at a later point, just to make sure I understand the usefulness of both. I was hoping to have a single uinit for the sampling, when I need it, as well as use it as a separate kit or add-on, such as what you're doing now. I've got a nagging feeling that is the very reason why you ended up with both. ;-)

FWIW, I have the orginal Simmons e-kit, which I use now for the e-drums add-on, and was hoping to replace it with one of the Roland units, and get the sampling, too. If it is determined that I really need two different units for what I want, I might just have to keep the Simmons around a bit longer.

Here's what I want:

1) The ability to have add-on e-drum sounds to my 7-piece Mapex Saturn acoustic kit.
2) The ability to trigger melodic instrument tracks, such as bass, keys, guitar, click, etc.
3) The ability to play the unit as a stand-alone kit at times such as what you mentioned.
4) At times, both 2 and 3 above.

Am I dreaming, or barking up the wrong tree with either of the Roland units?
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2011 Mapex Saturn - 8, 10, 12, 14 fl, 16 fl, 22x18
1974 Tama Royalstar - 8,10,12, 13,16 fl, 22x14
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  #18  
Old 10-31-2013, 03:21 AM
Blackstone Blackstone is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Boston
Posts: 65
Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrLeadFoot View Post
Here's what I want:

1) The ability to have add-on e-drum sounds to my 7-piece Mapex Saturn acoustic kit.
2) The ability to trigger melodic instrument tracks, such as bass, keys, guitar, click, etc.
3) The ability to play the unit as a stand-alone kit at times such as what you mentioned.
4) At times, both 2 and 3 above.

Am I dreaming, or barking up the wrong tree with either of the Roland units?
You're dreaming unfortunately. But if you had both units you'd see why they couldn't make one do everything in one unit. The yamaha multi is the closest thing to what you're looking for. But it only holds 64mb of samples. That's a decent amount if you're only using one shots. But if you want loops, and backtracks your in big trouble.

If you can swing it, get both. If you find you can do without one, you'll get close to what you paid for it on eBay.(provided you buy it on eBay. I got both mine from eBay new and way less than the retail price.) If you can only swing one, then....if you play out live, I'd say get the SX first. If this is more for jamroom recording, practice, writing, I'd get the 30 first. The phrase looper on the 30 is my favorite thing of everything musical I own. I take those loops, and put them on the SX(among many other things)
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  #19  
Old 10-31-2013, 04:53 PM
matchgrip1 matchgrip1 is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Northeastern Maryland
Posts: 6
Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

Blackstone is correct:

Here's what I want:

1) The ability to have add-on e-drum sounds to my 7-piece Mapex Saturn acoustic kit.
2) The ability to trigger melodic instrument tracks, such as bass, keys, guitar, click, etc.
3) The ability to play the unit as a stand-alone kit at times such as what you mentioned.
4) At times, both 2 and 3 above.

The SPD-30 gives you edrum sounds to add to your acoustic kit.

The SPD-SX will give you the ability to trigger melodic instrument tracks.

The SPD-30 can be played as a stand alone kit (adding a Vdrum pad, Ecymbals, and kick pad) will give you full control.

In order to do the four things listed, you would need both. That's exactly why I purchased both. Check e-bay and musicians friend as well. I just checked Musicians friend, and they have an SPD-SX floor demo they are letting go for $350.00 USD. Not bad considering it's an $800.00 USD unit!
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  #20  
Old 11-02-2013, 05:05 AM
MrLeadFoot MrLeadFoot is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: California
Posts: 388
Default Re: Roland SPD-SX Sampling vs. Octapad SPD-30 Phrasing, etc.

I checked MF, but don't see it. Do I have to look somewhere special?
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2011 Mapex Saturn - 8, 10, 12, 14 fl, 16 fl, 22x18
1974 Tama Royalstar - 8,10,12, 13,16 fl, 22x14
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