DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > Drum Gear > Other Gear

Other Gear Discuss Hardware and all other equipment not covered in the other topics

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 05-28-2013, 11:38 AM
sillywabbit sillywabbit is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 14
Default drum shield

I will be putting my drumkit in the garage and planned on putting a drumshield behind my kit to help keep some of the noise from entering the house. Had a few quesions:

1) has anyone ordered from drumperfect.com? I found them on ebay but they don't have any contact information on their website.

2) I thought about using some adhesive to bind some acoustic foam to my drum shield. Has anyone tried this with success? I know it won't be studio quality but i would like to keep some of the noise reflection down as well.

Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-28-2013, 02:12 PM
toddmc's Avatar
toddmc toddmc is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Gold Coast, Australia
Posts: 954
Default Re: drum shield

Never owned one myself but from what I've been told these things will do diddly-squat in terms of noise reduction.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-28-2013, 04:17 PM
alparrott's Avatar
alparrott alparrott is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wenatchee, WA
Posts: 3,788
Default Re: drum shield

As Todd noted, a drum shield won't do much for keeping noise from leaking out into the neighborhood. They tend to cut out the high-frequency cut and bleed a little (which is their primary use, to prevent certain things from getting into other mics on stage and to keep the drum mics mixed more cleanly), but the bass freqs will just rumble right next door. And if you buy a four-panel or five-panel (in other words, not 360 degrees) drum shield, you're reflecting the highs in another direction.

Foam will cut down sound reflection a lot more than will the drum shield. But for true soundproofing, you need a room-within-a-room, and those are costly.

Do a search on soundproofing or sound reduction here on the forum and you'll easily find a hundred threads, all of which will say what I just said.
__________________
Al Parrott
"Jus suum cuique"
-------------------------------------------------------
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-29-2013, 12:53 AM
ftlbs ftlbs is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1
Default Re: drum shield

I recently started playing christian music at church. Being an old rock and roller it's taken some getting used to. We surrounded my kit with a 5 panel 1/4" shield. It keeps the drums out of the mics, but doesn't Dampen the sound of the kit.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-29-2013, 03:11 AM
konaboy's Avatar
konaboy konaboy is offline
Pioneer Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Midwest, USA
Posts: 2,484
Default Re: drum shield

Quote:
Originally Posted by alparrott View Post
As Todd noted, a drum shield won't do much for keeping noise from leaking out into the neighborhood. They tend to cut out the high-frequency cut and bleed a little (which is their primary use, to prevent certain things from getting into other mics on stage and to keep the drum mics mixed more cleanly), but the bass freqs will just rumble right next door. And if you buy a four-panel or five-panel (in other words, not 360 degrees) drum shield, you're reflecting the highs in another direction.

Foam will cut down sound reflection a lot more than will the drum shield. But for true soundproofing, you need a room-within-a-room, and those are costly.

Do a search on soundproofing or sound reduction here on the forum and you'll easily find a hundred threads, all of which will say what I just said.
Exactly what he said!!! There are no shortcuts to sound reduction and a sound shield will not achieve what you want it to.
__________________
"how are you living your Dash?"
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-18-2013, 08:16 PM
plastickman's Avatar
plastickman plastickman is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: BFE Texas
Posts: 21
Default Re: drum shield

As already noted, only about 2 feet of concrete can significantly reduce low-frequency soundwaves. For studio settings, you need something pretty beefy like a full-on ClearSonic enclosure with all the bells and whistles. For live settings (especially small venues), low-end sound is not the real issue; it's all the high-frequency clutter that creates the loud and muddy mess that musicians hate. For your garage setup you could probably just stack haybales around your kit - as long as you don't mind setting up a housing development for rodents in your garage. In all seriousness, haybales would probably be pretty effective; they have an R40 insulation rate for heat and cold, and that translates into sound insulation as well. For your garage, aesthetics wouldn't be a big issue; you'd just want to moisture proof them if you live in a humid area.

Last edited by plastickman; 06-18-2013 at 09:54 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com