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  #1  
Old 01-03-2013, 03:07 AM
SntmntlGk SntmntlGk is offline
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Default Identifying drums so I can repair/replace parts

Hi everyone, I'm new here and totally new to drumming. Sorry if I get some terminology wrong, still figuring out what's what. Got my first set for Christmas after driving my husband insane for the past year talking about how badly I wanted to learn and here I am.

My uncle sold us his cymbals/stands and drums, and was told when he bought the drums that they're something from the 60s but he doesn't think they are.

Does anyone have any idea how I can identify them? There are no badges or anything on them and I'm trying to figure out what they might be so I can get what I think are called tom holders - the part that attaches the toms to the bass drum. The bolt on one of them where the tom attaches is stripped and another bolt on the part that attaches to the bass drum seems to be stripped.

Maybe I don't need to get specific branded parts to match, if so how do I go about figuring out what would fit/work?

Thanks for any ideas you can give me!
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Old 01-03-2013, 03:12 AM
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GRUNTERSDAD GRUNTERSDAD is offline
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Default Re: Identifying drums so I can repair/replace parts

Post a few photos and experts on this site will help you out.
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Old 01-03-2013, 03:48 AM
SntmntlGk SntmntlGk is offline
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Default Re: Identifying drums so I can repair/replace parts

Hope the size of these comes out right! Apologies for the mess in photo 4, I have them all pulled apart trying to figure them out!
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Old 01-03-2013, 03:52 AM
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BacteriumFendYoke BacteriumFendYoke is offline
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Default Re: Identifying drums so I can repair/replace parts

The pictures aren't too clear but I'm going to say that they look like an old Rogers kit. Swiv-o-Matic hardware.
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Old 01-03-2013, 04:07 AM
SntmntlGk SntmntlGk is offline
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Default Re: Identifying drums so I can repair/replace parts

Thanks for the reply, would it help if I made the pictures bigger?
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Old 01-03-2013, 04:13 AM
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Pocket-full-of-gold Pocket-full-of-gold is offline
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Default Re: Identifying drums so I can repair/replace parts

Quote:
Originally Posted by SntmntlGk View Post
Thanks for the reply, would it help if I made the pictures bigger?
Yep. Include clear pictures of the lugs and mounting hardware as it can often be used to identify drums.
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Old 01-03-2013, 04:39 AM
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MikeM MikeM is offline
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Default Re: Identifying drums so I can repair/replace parts

I recognize that hardware! No surprise the drum key style tighteners are stripped (and replaced by bolts) since all on my kit from that era/factory did the same thing.

I bought mine in '81 from a guy who had them for a couple years, and he got them second hand from someone else who had them for who-knows how long. That should put them mid-'70s-ish.

They have the old style Pearl lugs and were sold under a bunch of different names, like Maxwin, CB-700, and Reuther (mine), as well as probably some others. They are mahogany shells and yours look like they may have been rewrapped at some point (nice looking, by the way).

I would just get some cheap after market (possibly used or cannibalized from another kit) tom holder arrangement. Many drum shops have lots of old parts lying around for scavenging. You'll probably need to redrill the shells to get the new bolt patterns to line up, but since these are old made in Taiwan stencil kits (student), you will be doing a lot more good than harm. A very worthy undertaking, IMO.

The other thing you could do if you only plan on using one rack tom is put it in a snare stand right next to your kick drum. That way you don't have to mess with any mounting swap-outs and medieval drilling.
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Old 01-03-2013, 04:47 AM
SntmntlGk SntmntlGk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
I recognize that hardware! No surprise the drum key style tighteners are stripped (and replaced by bolts) since all on my kit from that era/factory did the same thing.

I bought mine in '81 from a guy who had them for a couple years, and he got them second hand from someone else who had them for who-knows how long. That should put them mid-'70s-ish.

They have the old style Pearl lugs and were sold under a bunch of different names, like Maxwin, CB-700, and Reuther (mine), as well as probably some others. They are mahogany shells and yours look like they may have been rewrapped at some point (nice looking, by the way).

I would just get some cheap after market (possibly used or cannibalized from another kit) tom holder arrangement. Many drum shops have lots of old parts lying around for scavenging. You'll probably need to redrill the shells to get the new bolt patterns to line up, but since these are old made in Taiwan stencil kits (student), you will be doing a lot more good than harm. A very worthy undertaking, IMO.
Awesome, thanks! Still happy to post better pics if needed, but this sounds like a good start for researching info. There's a drum shop here in town and a couple of pawn shops with lots of instruments/equipment so I'll definitely check around.

I wasn't sure about the value (or lack thereof) for these when we got them but figured they're more than good enough for starting out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
The other thing you could do if you only plan on using one rack tom is put it in a snare stand right next to your kick drum. That way you don't have to mess with any mounting swap-outs and medieval drilling.
That's an interesting idea. I do have two but suppose I don't necessarily need them both just starting out.

Last edited by Bernhard; 01-03-2013 at 10:27 AM. Reason: Edited by Arky: merging consecutive posts
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Old 01-03-2013, 03:36 PM
tamadrm tamadrm is offline
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Default Re: Identifying drums so I can repair/replace parts

Late 60's early 70's Pearl made like Mike said.The lugs give it away.

Pearl used to rip off hardware designs of other drum makers like Rogers,Slingerland,Gretsch and Ludwig.

Your drums are Japanese made copies of those American made brands.

I hope you didn't pay a lot.That kit is worth around 100-150 if I was totally in love with it.

With good drum heads and tuning,the'll sound decent if thr're in round and the bearing edges are in good shape.(thats the very edge of the drum where the drum head contacts the drum.

Steve B
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Old 01-03-2013, 04:28 PM
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Nickropolis Nickropolis is offline
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Default Re: Identifying drums so I can repair/replace parts

I've actually refinished two shells (12 and 13) from that line of kit. Same mounts, hardware and lugs.

They are indeed cheap, I found them in the basement of the house I just moved out of.
Someone simply left them because they weren't worth moving and in less than good condition.

The wrap is some kind of weird, papery type of stuff, not the usual plastic.
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