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  #1  
Old 12-16-2012, 08:59 AM
Lanlan Lanlan is offline
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Default Good Electronic Kit for Relatively Cheap

First and foremost, hi. First post.
I would like some advice on an electronic drum kit to buy. Living in an apartment, not being able to play my acoustic kit kills me. But I also work at Walmart (hooray) so I can't afford a lot. I've been looking at kits priced around $350 like the Alesis DM6. I hear it has problems with double bass pedals. So I have a few questions:

What would be a good kit for this price?

How modular are electronic kits? Like can I just buy random stuff and add it on?

How can I connect it to my PC?

Would I be able to plug it into my stereo via auxiliary input?

Really any advice is welcome, I'm a complete noob when it comes to electronic kits.
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  #2  
Old 12-16-2012, 09:53 AM
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Defender Defender is offline
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Default Re: Good Electronic Kit for Relatively Cheap

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lanlan View Post
What would be a good kit for this price?

How modular are electronic kits? Like can I just buy random stuff and add it on?

How can I connect it to my PC?

Would I be able to plug it into my stereo via auxiliary input?

Really any advice is welcome, I'm a complete noob when it comes to electronic kits.
I had a Simmons Kit (Guitar Center Brand) for about 3 or 4 years before I bought my Yamaha Kit. I would say that it held up nicely for what it was. The triggering isnt the greatest, so dont plan on doing any super fast snare rolling and such, but it worked for what it was.

About adding on... good luck with that. I dont think my Simmons kit had any additional inputs for additional pads. And with most of the Roland Kits, they use a proprietary plug and allow one additional pad (cymbal usually) to be added. My Yamaha 535K allows me to add up to 4 single zone pads, so that's exactly what I've done, but most normally priced units dont allow that much expansion.

Some have USB and some dont. You'll have to look at that yourself to see if it's worth the extra money.

Plugging into your stereo, probably, but not sure how it would sound.
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Old 12-16-2012, 11:04 AM
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Davo-London Davo-London is offline
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Default Re: Good Electronic Kit for Relatively Cheap

Electronic drums reinforce the old adage:

"you get what you pay for"

like nothing else.

A cheap kit will feel and sound cheap. There's is no getting round this. I would encourage you to look for used kits.

Davo
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  #4  
Old 12-16-2012, 12:02 PM
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gaz farrimond gaz farrimond is offline
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Default Re: Good Electronic Kit for Relatively Cheap

I agree with the above, look out for a used Yamaha DTX-press (I have one for practise) or Roland TD-6; with some searching you should pick one up for your budget.
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  #5  
Old 12-16-2012, 07:08 PM
ohiodrummer1964 ohiodrummer1964 is offline
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Default Re: Good Electronic Kit for Relatively Cheap

Defender, I'm happy you had good luck with you Simmons kit. A lot of people on this forum have complained about parts breaking in less than a year. I'm sure your Yamaha sounds better, too.

And Lanlan, I haven't played one, but I've seen several comments stating that the Alesis pads are the noisiest ones on the market and defeat the purpose of buying an e-kit for use in an apartment. I've also heard the same complaint about Alesis as Simmons: parts breaking very quickly. I think the suggestions to look for a used DTX-press or TD-6 are right on the money. Use the search function to look up those models and you'll find that they are considered to be good quality, basic kits which forum members use in their apartments.

Edit: Actually, you don't need to use the search function, gaz farrimond just stated that he uses the DTX-press for practice. I can tell you that other members here use the same kit, and I can't remember anyone not liking it.

Last edited by ohiodrummer1964; 12-16-2012 at 07:12 PM. Reason: Further Thought
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  #6  
Old 12-19-2012, 04:00 AM
achdumeingute achdumeingute is offline
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Default Re: Good Electronic Kit for Relatively Cheap

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lanlan View Post
First and foremost, hi. First post.
I would like some advice on an electronic drum kit to buy. Living in an apartment, not being able to play my acoustic kit kills me. But I also work at Walmart (hooray) so I can't afford a lot. I've been looking at kits priced around $350 like the Alesis DM6. I hear it has problems with double bass pedals. So I have a few questions:

What would be a good kit for this price?

How modular are electronic kits? Like can I just buy random stuff and add it on?

How can I connect it to my PC?

Would I be able to plug it into my stereo via auxiliary input?

Really any advice is welcome, I'm a complete noob when it comes to electronic kits.
There are no "good kits" for this price. You can probably pick up a used TD-3 for near that price(400-500), or a used TD-4 around 600-700.

Don't know about PC...Are you trying to connect the pads to the PC to use a drumming software instead of the module?

I'm sure you can plug it in through the AUX input. You can convert the headphone out to a stereo at worse.
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  #7  
Old 12-19-2012, 05:41 AM
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Bo Eder Bo Eder is offline
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Default Re: Good Electronic Kit for Relatively Cheap

If I may suggest something else: if you just want to be able to play, how about getting some mesh heads for your existing kit and playing that? A set of mesh heads won't cost more than $100 and you'd be playing your drums, albeit silently so you're not bothering anyone.

You could get the neoprene pads for your cymbals and you'd have an almost silent practice kit made from the drums and cymbals you're used to playing. Yes, it will take some imagination on your part to imagine what the drums would really be sounding like, but it's just for practicing so your chops are always ready.

I've played electronics (and continue to play a Zendrum Z4 whenever it's permitted) and I'll never understand how anyone can think this is a substitute for an acoustic set of drums. It isn't - it's another instrument, but worse: it's like a computer that you'll eventually have to upgrade. Acoustic drums need no upgrades - the upgrades come from the player.

I had a little Sonor Safari kit that I put mesh heads on and set it up in a corner of one of my rooms and you know, I played that thing everyday for an hour, and the cool thing was that it didn't matter what hour. Although mesh heads don't feel like regular plastic heads, it's the closest thing to the real thing if you're talking about keeping up your technique without disturbing everyone around you. Check it out.
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  #8  
Old 12-19-2012, 05:53 AM
mxo721 mxo721 is offline
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Default Re: Good Electronic Kit for Relatively Cheap

I'm torn on this one, I had a simmons sd7k, for about a year: the pros, being able to play at 2 am, and being able to adjust the volume of the song I was playing to perfectly in my wireless headphones, and I love the (voice) metronome, for some reason I really liked hearing the guy say "1 2 3 4 " over " boing..tic...tic....tic boig" BUT, I hated how the high-hat was almost backards of a real one, like you had to lift your foot, to get a closed hihat sound, and the sound of the stick hitting those plastic cymbals...../shivers.
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  #9  
Old 12-22-2012, 11:09 PM
New Tricks New Tricks is offline
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Default Re: Good Electronic Kit for Relatively Cheap

Quote:
How modular are electronic kits? Like can I just buy random stuff and add it on?

How can I connect it to my PC?

Would I be able to plug it into my stereo via auxiliary input?
They are very modular. The mounting hardware varies but most utilize a rack made from 1.5" tubing.

Generally, you connect to anything via 1/8" stereo jacks.

All my gear was purchased used from Craigslist. I recommend Roland. I started with a used TD6 kit for $300






Quote:
I've played electronics (and continue to play a Zendrum Z4 whenever it's permitted) and I'll never understand how anyone can think this is a substitute for an acoustic set of drums. It isn't - it's another instrument, but worse:
E drums are sometimes the logical choice. Unless I magically end up in a situation with a professional sound engineer on staff, my acoustics are going to continue to collect dust.

I will trade off some dynamics in order to get a good consistent band mix.
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