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  #1  
Old 07-29-2005, 08:44 PM
vroom125
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Default TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

What are the advantages and disadvantages of each grip? Which grip do you use?
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  #2  
Old 07-29-2005, 09:04 PM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

Ah yes, the time honored classic question: matched versus traditional. I personally use both grips. But there isn't really any advantages of one over the other.
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  #3  
Old 07-29-2005, 11:15 PM
cvighals cvighals is offline
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

Yes there is an advantage with the traditional grip: IT LOOKS BETTER!!

But I can`t learn it, I just don`t seem to get it, how to execute it!!?
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  #4  
Old 07-30-2005, 12:22 AM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

Quote:
Originally Posted by cvighals
Yes there is an advantage with the traditional grip: IT LOOKS BETTER!!

But I can`t learn it, I just don`t seem to get it, how to execute it!!?
download it at downloaddrums.com/tradional.exe

Unzip to the drummer folder

Execute Tradional.exe

and voila! La Tradional En Perfection!
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  #5  
Old 07-30-2005, 01:13 AM
cvighals cvighals is offline
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyaxe
download it at downloaddrums.com/tradional.exe

Unzip to the drummer folder

Execute Tradional.exe

and voila! La Tradional En Perfection!
It`s not a virus or anything ?
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  #6  
Old 07-30-2005, 01:50 AM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

Quote:
Originally Posted by vroom125
What are the advantages and disadvantages of each grip? Which grip do you use?
It's easier to damage your wrists trying to play hard with incorrect trad grip than matched. Says one who did it.

Matched is, for me, better for power playing and for some reason it just seems to feel better than trad grip for semiquaver based music. It's also easier to get consistent strokes going between your hands as you just need to duplicate movements from right to left.

Traditional grip is better for finesse, feels better in triplets (probably because I use it more for jazz than anything else) and also has some independence advantages for me - I find it easier to separate my right and left hands when the techniques are different, for some reason. I do find it harder to get consistent rolls and so forth in trad grip though.

That's all IMHO, but I use both regularly for different reasons. I also switch between a few different matched grips where I see fit as well...
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  #7  
Old 07-30-2005, 01:55 AM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

Quote:
Originally Posted by cvighals
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyaxe
download it at downloaddrums.com/tradional.exe

Unzip to the drummer folder

Execute Tradional.exe

and voila! La Tradional En Perfection!
It`s not a virus or anything ?
*psst* i think he's kidding!

...

You know, if you say banana really slowly it sounds like gullable... lol.
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  #8  
Old 07-30-2005, 05:43 AM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

I was about to post the same topic earlier.... I have been playing American/french grip for the past 6 + 1/2 years since I started playing, and I have never gotten a good explanation as to why Trad is better for any given situation. And don't get me wrong, I am incredibly intrigued by match and do want to learn it to, but HOW HARD IS IT TO GET A STRAIGHT ANSWER!!!! I'm sure it must be great in certain ways, but it seems totally unnatural....

Please enlighten me, somebody!!!
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  #9  
Old 07-30-2005, 06:33 AM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

The specific reason why I do it is versatility... I like to play mallets, timbales and tympanis as well, and traditional grip doesn't cross over to those instruments. Plus if you ever want to explore open hand playing, you have that option.
Besides, I think traditional is out of it's time, it was created for field snare drummers who tilted their snares to the side. We don't really need to do that anymore, so why should we?
One more point- I like to make sure my weak hand(left) is as good as my right... what better way to compare than to use the exact same grips?
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  #10  
Old 07-30-2005, 07:48 AM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lambo
I was about to post the same topic earlier.... I have been playing American/french grip for the past 6 + 1/2 years since I started playing, and I have never gotten a good explanation as to why Trad is better for any given situation. And don't get me wrong, I am incredibly intrigued by match and do want to learn it to, but HOW HARD IS IT TO GET A STRAIGHT ANSWER!!!! I'm sure it must be great in certain ways, but it seems totally unnatural....

Please enlighten me, somebody!!!
Righty :)

For jazz, traditional grip is quite ideal as far as I'm concerned. Reasons:

* Right hand is still able to describe a straight line to the cymbal, just like in matched grip. We'll ignore the right hand since it's obviously no different, but this is just to counter the usual "Why not play trad-left with both hands then?" :)
* Stick being on top of the hand makes it easier to execute strokes from extremely low heights - you have to move your hand to get a stroke, instead of the hand being kind of "pulled down" by the stick. Hard to explain, you have to feel it.
* The nature of the grip allows you to change the angle from which the stick strikes the head. For rock or pop I tend towards hitting as close to parallel to the head as I can without hitting the rims, but in jazz comping it is useful tonally to be able to alter the angle up to 45 degrees or even more. Watch some old jazz players and you'll see what I mean. This is really not easily achieveable in matched grip without dropping your snare very low, and that cuts off your ability to his parallel strokes.
* I find it easier to hit the tops (not the edges) of cymbals in traditional grip, for the same reason as the point above. That's often appropriate in jazz where you might just want a very gentle note with the tip of a stick on a crash cymbal rather than a full blown whack like you would in a rock context.
* Again for the same reason, it's easier to play muted strokes into a drum (hit and leave the stick in) with your left hand in trad grip - you can raise the stick angle to nearly ninety degrees and just push down. There's a Peter Erskine video where he does this quite nicely in a solo, it's a pleasant musical effect, particularly when you leave the stick in and use it as a pitch-bend for the other hand by altering the pressure. Doing this in matched grip with the stick a lower angle to the head results in more tension in the wrist.

So, for those reasons I think traditional grip is mechanically better for some uses. I still play mostly matched though, for the same reasons mentioned elsewhere in the thread - adaptability, ability to open up the hands and so forth. I've just developed a fairly seamless way of switching between the two grips (it's the only twirl I do!) and have enough overlap that I can play either way until I get enough time to make the switch.
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  #11  
Old 07-30-2005, 02:05 PM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

I try to use both, but technically I'm better in mached. Sometimes it feels better to play traditional, sometimes mached, depending on the situation.

But I still believe you can exerciese both grips to play anything with it. You can go as far as you want with each grip. So I think it's more a metter of technique than a metter of grip.

Many drummers proved that you can do everything with both grips.

I play the grip I feel the most comfortable at the moment.

And also: I also like to play marimba and stuff, and you need mached for it.
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  #12  
Old 07-30-2005, 03:20 PM
mikkeydee mikkeydee is offline
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

I ve played both.
with matched grip i cant even do an even double stroke roll
with trad i can play good rudiments, which give me a good reputation as a tutor in my area.

That might sound weird to most of u.. I know all the muscle/phisical/mechanical theories......but it s just the way works for me....

Anyone the same as i am?
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  #13  
Old 07-30-2005, 03:37 PM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

Quote:
Originally Posted by finnhiggins
Righty :)

For jazz, traditional grip is quite ideal as far as I'm concerned. Reasons...
I understand the technical differences between grips that allow for higher angles on drums and light hits on crashes (although I don't understand then, why you have your cymbals so high, so forget that advantage). So other than the higher angle possibility, there's no other advantage. I hear people say it gives a lighter feel and better feel and more voice possibilities on the drums, but that's totally incorrect. I can get every little nuance out of my instument playing matched that I heard a old (like 60 something!) jazz player who idolized traditional grip, he was testing me and I proved him wrong. I can understand why people say matched is for more power, but THIS IS ONLY if you don't have that much control out of your left hand! You can be just as subtle with your left with matched grip.

So I choose matched because I have all the same control that traditional people claim is exclusive to them plus both my hands are identical for ambidextrous playing (ease of reversing stickings and such for different voicing around my kit)
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  #14  
Old 07-30-2005, 04:08 PM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

With traditional grip, you can incorporate fingers into the playing much easier (well, IF you can do it, its very difficult if you were raised match grip). Watch the Drumbassadors or Steve Smith, and just watch how fast the play with just fingers.

As for me, I play traditional when grooving, but switch (quick twirl) to matched when I move around the kit with big fast loud licks. Otherwise I miss stuff, and drop the left stick (mostly because I'm not very good with traditional grip, but always practicing on the pad to get better).,

Also for Jazz comping, I find it better to have the hand UNDER the stick as opposed to over it. I think its easier to manipulate the notes that way, especially triplets.
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  #15  
Old 07-30-2005, 07:39 PM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu_Strib
With traditional grip, you can incorporate fingers into the playing much easier (well, IF you can do it, its very difficult if you were raised match grip). Watch the Drumbassadors or Steve Smith, and just watch how fast the play with just fingers.

As for me, I play traditional when grooving, but switch (quick twirl) to matched when I move around the kit with big fast loud licks. Otherwise I miss stuff, and drop the left stick (mostly because I'm not very good with traditional grip, but always practicing on the pad to get better).,

Also for Jazz comping, I find it better to have the hand UNDER the stick as opposed to over it. I think its easier to manipulate the notes that way, especially triplets.
And what about the right hand? Every of those drummers still play mached with their right hand and have the same controle as with their left (traditional) hand.
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  #16  
Old 07-30-2005, 07:55 PM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

..... I would say the Free stroke..
you'll say its a stroke, not a grip, but not, its a stroke that can be don only with the "free-grip".. that just my point of view..

just read the way I understand this concept:

in fact, the grips interact on the strokes.. and the "free-stroke-grip" is a combination of these two grips and strokes.

the traditional grip allow you to strokeby turning (don't find the right word, maybe twisting) your wrist and your front armlever..
the matched grip allox you to stroke by flexing you wrist and your arm.

So there two different movements:
-"traditional"=movement or your front arm lever, just like when you roll your fist on a table
-"matched"=movement or your wirst, when you tap on a table, without moving any other part of your body

the free-grip is like like the traditional grip, but with your hand's palm directed to the ground, and the stick is not taken between the fingers, but taken by tuos fingers, in the hand. (it is very significant to keep the hand parallel at the ground).

by this grip you'll be able to do both movements: twisting your front arm, and flexing your wrist...

maybe I'm wrong, cuz I'm a noob drummer, but's that the way I understand this concept
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  #17  
Old 07-30-2005, 11:21 PM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

I think traditional is a bit more comfortable than matched, but either are fun to play.
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  #18  
Old 07-30-2005, 11:33 PM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

Quote:
Originally Posted by aahznightsky
I understand the technical differences between grips that allow for higher angles on drums and light hits on crashes (although I don't understand then, why you have your cymbals so high, so forget that advantage). So other than the higher angle possibility, there's no other advantage. I hear people say it gives a lighter feel and better feel and more voice possibilities on the drums, but that's totally incorrect.
Not really. How do you get a lighter feel and more voicing possibilities? Changing the angle of the stick is a very powerful way of doing that, yet you just discounted that as an advantage.

As for my cymbals, they're as low as I can get them without being uncomfortable trying to hit crashes through them in matched grip. If I play a crash then my hands would be at about shoulder height at the time of impact. In order to reach the top of the cymbals in matched I have to lift a little above shoulder height and reach "over" the cymbal, in traditional grip I can do it with my hands at shoulder height.

I think ideally it's a good idea to try to keep your hands at or below shoulder height when playing, any higher and I find I get more tension and tiredness creeping in.

As for the person who asked the everlasting "Why not play that way with both hands?" question... I headed that one off earlier: When playing ride cymbal with the right hand it is easier to have the stick in line with the arm to make it easier to stand the weight of holding your arm up in the air for a long time. Simple.

I don't doubt it's possible to get the same control in matched as in traditional. I don't doubt it's possible to get the same power in traditional as in matched. It's just harder to do and takes more time to learn, so I don't see why you wouldn't just learn to switch as appropriate.
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  #19  
Old 07-31-2005, 12:44 AM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

bahhh, my post was just full of ortograph mistakes....I've just correct them.. sry

anyway if you want to learn more about the "free stroke" technic, go on Vic Firth web site ( www.vicfirth.com ) and find the Dom Faramulo's educative video vault.

Its full of information.
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  #20  
Old 07-31-2005, 01:12 AM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

I dont know about the whole control issue of matched vs. traditional. I dont think that someone can get more control in one grip than the other. I started playing trad about a year ago, but I stopped because I realized that if I can learn to do everything with one grip instead of needing 2, then i'd be better off. Why would you want to switch when you dont have to? If anything, I'd only switch for the emotional feel. If i'm playing jazz, i would rather play traditional than matched just because I like the feel of it, but not because it sounds better. I just find that it's extra effort to learn 2 grips when you dont need to (except for the fact that it looks SO stylish :P).
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  #21  
Old 07-31-2005, 05:31 AM
Henry II
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lambo
I was about to post the same topic earlier.... I have been playing American/french grip for the past 6 + 1/2 years since I started playing, and I have never gotten a good explanation as to why Trad is better for any given situation. And don't get me wrong, I am incredibly intrigued by match and do want to learn it to, but HOW HARD IS IT TO GET A STRAIGHT ANSWER!!!! I'm sure it must be great in certain ways, but it seems totally unnatural....

Please enlighten me, somebody!!!
The fact that you can't get a straight answer may actually be the answer you're looking for. Hmmm?

Anyway, here's my explanation based on my experience. Trad left hand grip uses forearm pronation to manipulate the stick - a mechanically superior motion to wrist technique - AS LONG AS THE ARM IS BENT AT ABOUT A 90 DEGREE ANGLE - in other words, on snare. When you straighten your arm greater that 90 degrees, ie: reaching for anything other than snare, the advantage is lost and a matched grip is superior. In fact, I think that the matched grip actually works better with the arm straightened beyond 90 degress.

JMHO. YMMV.
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  #22  
Old 08-01-2005, 03:14 AM
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Default slicing

Hey there..I'm trying to make myself learn the Traditional Grip, to be better suited for Jazz, and when i try to use my left hand, it seems to make the stick slice from side to side. Does anybody know what i'm talking about? What am I doing wrong, and how can I fix it? Also, sorry if this is a repost.
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  #23  
Old 08-01-2005, 05:04 AM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

i love traditional grip! its the best
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  #24  
Old 08-01-2005, 11:51 AM
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Default Re: Traditional vs. Matched Grips

The first two years of drumming, I played match grip and have recently switched to traditional and I just love it. It feels so much more natural to me. May be because I'm a jazz freak. With the snare drum a bit bent, I find the stick has a better contact.

take care,
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  #25  
Old 08-01-2005, 12:13 PM
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Default Re: slicing

hello? anybody there?
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  #26  
Old 08-01-2005, 01:15 PM
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Default Re: slicing

i know this really doesn't help much but i personally think that learning trad grip if you are already a matched grip player is a waste of time. trad was invented for marching with a drum on your hip into battle. the modern drumset does not need this grip for any styles...including jazz (although i will grant that in some ways it does look cool). if you learned trad grip from the start there is nothing wrong with carrying on with it but to develop a whole new approach seems silly to me. i would rather find a true weak sopt in my playing and work on that.

maybe when i have been drumming for thirty years i will learn trad just for a new adventure, but with guys like thomas lang tarring some unbelievable roads out there i don't think it will be very soon when i run out of things to try that are hard enough in the grip i've always used. and yes i know thomas is a mixed grip player but he is so far ahead of me that i won't even consider him as a role model in this arena.

j
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Old 08-01-2005, 01:49 PM
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Default Re: slicing

Quote:
Originally Posted by NUTHA JASON
i know this really doesn't help much but i personally think that learning trad grip if you are already a matched grip player is a waste of time. trad was invented for marching with a drum on your hip into battle. the modern drumset does not need this grip for any styles...

<snip>

maybe when i have been drumming for thirty years i will learn trad just for a new adventure
j
Don't knock it until you've tried it. I started off matched, and I use both. They're both practical and useful for different things.
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  #28  
Old 08-02-2005, 02:41 AM
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Default Re: TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

originally posted by AurelienPK

Hey there..I'm trying to make myself learn the Traditional Grip, to be better suited for Jazz, and when i try to use my left hand, it seems to make the stick slice from side to side. Does anybody know what i'm talking about? What am I doing wrong, and how can I fix it? Also, sorry if this is a repost.

You should try watching your self at an angle in a mirror of some kind. Do this just playing fully extended eighth notes at @ 80 bmp. You'll notice that you'll either have to bend your wrist in towards your body, or push it out and extend your ring finger to compensate for the slice. Maintain a relaxed shoulder and let the stick rebound uninhibited while making these adjustments. I have found that if you will practice in a mirror regularly(I.E. 20 to 30 mins a day) you'll fix problems like this naturally. Then hopefully muscle memory will kick in and the problem will go away. Always remember to check your arms so there not sticking out some funny or unatural way. They should come up from your side bending at the elbows with no tension or stress of any kind.
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  #29  
Old 08-02-2005, 09:30 AM
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Default Re: TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

Quote:
Originally Posted by cpdrumming
originally posted by AurelienPK

Hey there..I'm trying to make myself learn the Traditional Grip, to be better suited for Jazz, and when i try to use my left hand, it seems to make the stick slice from side to side. Does anybody know what i'm talking about? What am I doing wrong, and how can I fix it? Also, sorry if this is a repost.

You should try watching your self at an angle in a mirror of some kind. Do this just playing fully extended eighth notes at @ 80 bmp. You'll notice that you'll either have to bend your wrist in towards your body, or push it out and extend your ring finger to compensate for the slice. Maintain a relaxed shoulder and let the stick rebound uninhibited while making these adjustments. I have found that if you will practice in a mirror regularly(I.E. 20 to 30 mins a day) you'll fix problems like this naturally. Then hopefully muscle memory will kick in and the problem will go away. Always remember to check your arms so there not sticking out some funny or unatural way. They should come up from your side bending at the elbows with no tension or stress of any kind.
Thanks a LOT. I'll try it out, and hope it works.
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  #30  
Old 08-03-2005, 08:13 AM
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Default Re: TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

how do u use fingers (which fingers?) in trad grip. and i can't seem to get any power on the upstroke/rebound in a shuffle on the snare. advise plz
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  #31  
Old 08-03-2005, 03:25 PM
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Default Re: TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

Quote:
how do u use fingers (which fingers?) in trad grip. and i can't seem to get any power on the upstroke/rebound in a shuffle on the snare. advise plz
Practise.

@Topic: To me, Traditional just feels better. It also looks better and it is way easier to twirl Sticks in traditional grip. I only switch to matched Grip for playing some Freehand Stuff that I worked on over the last few months.

Still: Everybody is free to do it as he or she likes. And there is one thing about trad that is harder to do than matched: Playing a solid and stable backbeat with Rimshots. This is maybe the hardest thing to learn as a trad player.
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  #32  
Old 08-03-2005, 03:50 PM
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Default Re: TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

Both grips are important in my opinion. I started off with traditional, moved to matched, then moved back to traditional and actually prefer traditional now. I played in the high school marching band matched grip and played my kit that way to start. But once I joined a Scottish Pipes & Drums Corps., I had to go back to traditional which was difficult at first because I wasn't very strong in that grip. After playing it for 5 years, I use it on the kit more often than I do matched and when I practice, I practice traditional grip. Now, when I play just to practice, I use traditional, then move into matched and then keep switching depending on what I'm trying to accomplish. It makes playing much more fun when you can change things up a little bit.

From a spectator's standpoint, I've seen many different amateur and professional drummers use various grips. Roy Haynes uses traditional. Steve Gadd uses traditional. Josh Freese uses both I believe and Dave Grohl uses matched. My uncle who just got signed with his Jazz band uses matched and believes that traditional grip doesn't belong on the kit. To each his own.

Most important piece of advice; play what you are comfortable with but don't be afraid to try something new. You never know, it may bring an exciting new element to your drumming that you didn't know existed before.

Good luck and have fun!
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  #33  
Old 08-03-2005, 06:47 PM
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Default Re: slicing

Quote:
Originally Posted by NUTHA JASON
i know this really doesn't help much but i personally think that learning trad grip if you are already a matched grip player is a waste of time. trad was invented for marching with a drum on your hip into battle.
j
Nutha, With all due respect you should give it a try. Have you ever practiced the Open/Closed technique? For example the new Dave Weckl double-stroke video will prove my point. He talks about pinching the right hand (match grip) to get the double bounce viruses the Open/Closed technique for the right hand. But he goes on to say he doesnít change how heís used his left hand. Why? Because this grip is already as loose as it gets and itís natural to turn your wrist for the first hit (open) and itís natural to close your thumb after your hit for the bounce. This gives you a more natural open/closed move (again IMO). Give it a try.

Now itís like anything else if you want power you use the big muscles, for speed the small ones. So IMO both grips are quite useful and have there place. Itís true that grip was invented for marching but I think the advantage was two-fold because I think it also compensates for the weaker left hand of a right handed player. Look at Buddy Rich smoke it up with the left hand with very little movement.
Itís true this is not the best grip for the full drum kit playing rock, but if you want to open up those double-stroke rolls this is a good way to get the left hand working for you. Plus you can do a simple quick spin to get from there to matched grip.

That being said I do play mostly matched grip on the kit, but Iím a lefty that plays a right handed set so my left is stronger but my right is faster I think from years of Jazz cymbal work (moller style).

Try doing a double-stroke roll as fast as you can for about 60 seconds with the traditional grip and see if one hand gets tired first. My right does.

Itís kindía like the reading music threads. Itís not an absolute must but it canít hurt to learn it. Next time youíre playing that slow boring song (boom-tap, boom-tap) instead of playing open handed or ?? to keep you occupied play it with the traditional grip and before you know it will feel natural.
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  #34  
Old 08-03-2005, 08:54 PM
Pratt Pratt is offline
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Default Re: TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

minishee07, I believe that the first thing for you to concern about is how are you holding the left stick. assuming that your balance and pushing point is in the right place, you will use different fingers for different playing momentums.

for accents, youīll need arm rotation and thumb work to accelerate enough in order to get power. this is true for down and up strokes except that for down strokes youīll have to be able to control the stick bounce by embraceing the stick as quickly as possible after the stroke, between your middle and ring fingers.

for taps, gently open the fingers for release and with litlle arm rotation to bring the sick back, BUT for ups: youīll push back the stick with the first articulation of the ring finger, along with an energic arm rotation (the same but opposit of down stroke - to wich the thumb does the pulling work).

for continuous bounceing: arm rotation and impulse on the balance point (wich is located under the sistem formed by thumb and the point finger) will work fine. remember to use the feedback from the impact on the drum to push the stick back.

and...for double, triple or multiple bounces: a litlle pressure on the balance point and embrace the stick after you got enough strokes.

this works great for me, but is uneffective if you hold the stick too much towards the butt or the tip ends. then you kill fisics, and it kills you.

oh, the arm rotation, for traditional is the equivalent for the vertical wrist motion for match.

hope it has been of some help!
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Old 08-04-2005, 05:44 AM
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Default Re: TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

anyone else notice until stevis post they were all double two exact same posts
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  #36  
Old 08-04-2005, 11:24 AM
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NUTHA JASON NUTHA JASON is offline
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Default Re: TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

rick:
Quote:
Now itís like anything else if you want power you use the big muscles, for speed the small ones. So IMO both grips are quite useful and have there place
good post and i have nothing against drummers that use one or the other or both. its just that my matched grip technique uses big and small muscles too. i would rather become a brilliant matched grip drummer. just like my choice on pedals. i have avoided double bass because i want a great right foot and so the challenge is to do as much with one as i might do with two. that being said my left pumps the hi hat all the time... so i guess i could get into double bass but first i want chadsmith's. nico mcbraind and of course bonzo's single pedal skill.

i guess the argument is not one grip or the other but more shoul one learn one or both. for my money (or practice time) i would rather master one that be a 'jack' of both trades.

j
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Old 08-05-2005, 05:55 PM
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Rick Wilkinson Rick Wilkinson is offline
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Default Re: TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

NUTHA canít argue with you there except maybe the "'jack' of both trades" comment. Sounds so harsh, Itís all-good isnít it? The more you know the more you can grow and expand your capabilities.

But Mark Wessels (a Vic Firth Rudiment teacher) uses only Matched grip and he seems to be a brilliant matched grip player. And as was mentioned before that grip is better for the set players also. So what can I say?

I have no problem playing both ways myself, but play mostly matched grip (like you) but sometimes it just feels and sounds better (to me) to switch. I would just call it, having another tool in the bag.


Like in Dave Weckl double-stroke video he only had to re-train the right (matched grip) hand. So there must be some advantage to this grip wouldnít you agree?

But for sure, if you have a limited amount of practice time you need to adjust your priorities. I can see moving this down the list especially if the type of music you play does not require it. Youíre a teacher so you know more about that than me Iím sure. But a waste of time. That like most things is debatable.

BTW I like your Bonsai trees quite impressive.



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Old 08-05-2005, 06:08 PM
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NUTHA JASON NUTHA JASON is offline
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Default Re: TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

cool. no insult was meant by jack tho. its just a phrase.

j
ps now that summer is at its height the trees are looking great. might replace the photots with new ones that show them better.
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Old 08-05-2005, 06:28 PM
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Default Re: TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

A Bit off topic so you can delete this but I planted a Cottonless Cottonwood tree in my yard yesterday. But there no Bonsai for sure.
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Old 08-05-2005, 09:31 PM
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Default Re: TRADITIONAL vs MATCHED GRIP

i actually used to play traditional when i would play jazz because it was easier to get those quick one handed buzzes. now however i am able to play that stuff matched so i usually flip back and forth when playing jazz but other than that i play matched.
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