DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussion forum for all drum related topics. Use this forum to exchange ideas and information with your fellow drummers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #41  
Old 03-18-2016, 12:50 AM
wildbill's Avatar
wildbill wildbill is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Midwest - USA
Posts: 6,985
Default Re: reissues versus vintage

I bought a reissue Fender Mustang bass. Not only that, but it was made in Japan rather than the USA.
It was mostly a matter of pricing. IMO the older USA made ones are being priced way beyond their value.
I must say that it's very good quality, and I'm happy with it.

I don't have much nostalgia for older drums.
I was not drumming for the longest of times,
and still constantly hear of drums that I didn't know about because of that absence.

Old Ludwigs are the only ones that gave me a little twinge,
but I compromised a bit and got a somewhat newer set.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 03-18-2016, 12:58 AM
DrumEatDrum's Avatar
DrumEatDrum DrumEatDrum is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 9,443
Default Re: reissues versus vintage

Vintage guitars sell for more money than vintage drums because there are way, way, way more guitar players in the world than drummers.

Which means there is way, way, way more demand for vintage guitars than vintage drums.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 03-18-2016, 02:02 AM
FreDrummer's Avatar
FreDrummer FreDrummer is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Colorado, USA
Posts: 577
Default Re: reissues versus vintage

Quote:
Originally Posted by Odd-Arne Oseberg View Post
The idea many other instruments have in regard to electric guitar tones being all about pedal and electronics, almost comparing it to an electronic drum kit is frankly a bit insulting. For the right player with a simple traditional setup it surely is more or less an acoustic instrument that just happens to have an expanded dynamic range. Some people are tone players and care others are not...

...Now, no offence to drummers, like I am too now, but a metal snare drum and a quality guitar do not represent the same level of craftmanship. Finding a good old guitar is also more rare, but yes there is also more of a collectors market in guitars which drives the prices up. Those buyers are collectors and not players.
Great observations...Guys like the lead guitar player in our band, who plays a $12K PRS with PRS pickups wound with actual wire from 1958 -- his setup is guitar, cable, amp. Then again, he's been playing for 45+ years and knows a little bit about working the volume and tone controls through a Plexi. His "tone" is incredible...

I don't know how the bearing edges are on the old Ludwig wood drums, but my '76 Vistalites are almost comical! Bearing edge? What's that? On these drums, while the edges are flat and true, there's not really much of an "edge." More like, they were cut to the specific depth with a good, true cut, then the sharp edges were rounded over a bit. Not enough to call a "roundover" edge, mind you. After 40 years, they show a bit of "shrinkage" (low spot) right at the shell seams. Makes tuning a challenge -- once you get it to a point you can live with, don't touch it and mess with a good thing! There IS a certain charm with this, but any newer drum is just SO precise and does not present us with these "choices."
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 03-18-2016, 03:22 AM
Matt Bo Eder
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: reissues versus vintage

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostnote View Post
I listened to a clip on Sakae's website comparing their Trilogy snare drums to some old vintage drums. They sounded so dissimilar it was comical. I wondered why they even bothered putting them up on their site.
Given how much better the machines are that create drumshells, I wonder how hard it would be to make some shells randomly out-of-round? And then maybe do hand-cut bearing edges so at least a few of them don't come out right. Then you'd be on to some vintage territory, eh?
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 03-18-2016, 03:51 AM
Jhostetler's Avatar
Jhostetler Jhostetler is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Topeka, Indiana
Posts: 343
Default Re: reissues versus vintage

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Bo Eder View Post
Given how much better the machines are that create drumshells, I wonder how hard it would be to make some shells randomly out-of-round? And then maybe do hand-cut bearing edges so at least a few of them don't come out right. Then you'd be on to some vintage territory, eh?
Check out what Stone Custom Drum does.

http://stonecustomdrum.com/

Bernie made me a "new" 3-ply maple snare shell out of the original Slingerland machines. Hand cut the edges and drilled the holes himself. I then preceded to install 70's Roger Dynasonic hardware to the drum (minus the snare bridge) and wrap it in "Vintage WMP". So technically a new snare, made of new wood; but everything about it from the creation of the drum itself to the hardware is "vintage." I love the oddity of the thing.
__________________
"Nobody is anybody until they make themselves somebody"-Louis L'Amour
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 03-26-2016, 02:57 AM
GeoB's Avatar
GeoB GeoB is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Tidewater Virginia
Posts: 1,273
Default Re: reissues versus vintage

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikyok View Post
Here we go again, the can't say anything about Ringo brigade regardless of context. Wonder what Purdie was using at that time seeing as he's on the recordings.

.......Lets go fishing
You're the guy! I'm not a brigade member, more into the Morello club, at el... but the Starr(key's) donated it all to a charity they founded. So the reality is he made a cool nothing off the auction. I just thought the whole auction for charity idea was great.

A few years ago Cobham had warehouse in NYC full of kits that were probably endorsement kits etc... and he auctioned all that off but I'm not sure if that was a charitable event or not.

Already been fishing this week and I'm going back out on Monday.
__________________
dic quid gingiberi

Last edited by GeoB; 03-26-2016 at 03:16 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 03-27-2016, 02:22 AM
mandrew mandrew is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,262
Default Re: reissues versus vintage

There are some companies that have produced great sounding "replica" or "vintage" sounding drums, and I applaud them for it. I refer to C&C and George Way offerings. I would rather have one of these made to todays standars, rather than a 60's Ludwig set that some guy had in a basement, stacked one on another, which may have ply separation that you can't see. Along with corroded hardware, don't forget that older sutff may not have been built as sturdy as new stuff to begin with. If you want to play old stuff, just be prepares to nurse it along and be patient with it. Old is not always better.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 03-27-2016, 04:11 AM
Nate'sKit's Avatar
Nate'sKit Nate'sKit is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: From the home of King Records!
Posts: 354
Default Re: reissues versus vintage

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreDrummer View Post
Great observations...Guys like the lead guitar player in our band, who plays a $12K PRS with PRS pickups wound with actual wire from 1958 -- his setup is guitar, cable, amp. Then again, he's been playing for 45+ years and knows a little bit about working the volume and tone controls through a Plexi. His "tone" is incredible...

I don't know how the bearing edges are on the old Ludwig wood drums, but my '76 Vistalites are almost comical! Bearing edge? What's that? On these drums, while the edges are flat and true, there's not really much of an "edge." More like, they were cut to the specific depth with a good, true cut, then the sharp edges were rounded over a bit. Not enough to call a "roundover" edge, mind you. After 40 years, they show a bit of "shrinkage" (low spot) right at the shell seams. Makes tuning a challenge -- once you get it to a point you can live with, don't touch it and mess with a good thing! There IS a certain charm with this, but any newer drum is just SO precise and does not present us with these "choices."
Please explain to me in scientific terms how wire from 1958 effects anything. Electrons care as much about that as they care about what wood the transducers that pickup the vibrations of the ferromagnetic strings and turn them int electrical current, that create the sound of an electric guitar are placed in. Actually even less, as way down the line wood has a tiny little bitty effect on the sound of an electric guitar.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 03-27-2016, 04:13 AM
R2112's Avatar
R2112 R2112 is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 512
Default Re: reissues versus vintage

I can understand owning a new kit made to replicate vintage sound and feel. It's a lot easier to gig with because all bearing edges are perfect and very easy to tune. Hardware is new, technologically advanced and is very easy to set up and use. Nothing finicky about it. Just set up and play. That has absolute value for sure.

When I purchased my vintage Luddy. I noticed a faint buzzing noise coming from what appeared to be the shells. After further investigating I found the sound coming from a few of the lugs. I did some research and found that the springs in those older drums were never dampened and so over time they loosen and vibrate with the resonance. I found a solution where you remove all the lugs from the shells, wrap each spring with thin felt and problem solved. Now to some that's a huge hassle. For me though it gave me a reason to tear down my set, intimately get to know it and better understand it. That was really cool. Something I wouldn't do (or need to do) with a new, laser precision made set. Also, I can't use just any drum key to tune all the drums on my vintage Luddy. I have to use a drum key with thin metal walls because some of the lugs are closer to the rim than the other lugs. Personally, I like that I know that and know which lugs are slightly off the mark and IMHO all those imperfections are what make it have that sound and feel that only vintage has.

To each their own and I don't feel either new or vintage is a "standard" better than the other. Each have pros and cons that matter to the individual. Like owning a 2016 Camaro vs a 1969. Some would hate having to always tinker with the 1969 and the unrefined "rawness" of it vs the precision of the 2016...while others would dig that.

I guess the answer is to just own both ;-)
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 03-27-2016, 06:54 AM
drumming sort of person drumming sort of person is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Los Angeles, California
Posts: 2,521
Default Re: reissues versus vintage

Quote:
Originally Posted by PorkPieGuy View Post
Could it be that vintage guitars sound amazing and your average old drums sound like garbage?

...most older drums just sound like cr@p as compared to newer drums.
Very true. Spot on. Drums have come a long way from the turn of the last century, and even from the beginning of the current century.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com