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  #1  
Old 07-08-2014, 01:07 AM
Grolubao Grolubao is offline
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Default 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

http://lifehacker.com/study-shows-th...8Lifehacker%29

Interesting...
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Old 07-08-2014, 01:15 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

There is no magic number. Ever. And you should never keep track of your practice. "I gotta practice for an hour or else I'll suck"... no... practice when it feels right and good. Cease practicing when you've had enough. Drummers drum and placing merit upon time spent an be counterproductive.

Now it's OK to set up an hour a day to practice and fill it, but some days you'll do 20 minutes, others 45 and other days you'll exceed that hour.

As for me I practice constantly, even when I'm nowhere near a drumkit. It's all in one's head.
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Old 07-08-2014, 02:05 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Here is a very nice explanation.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7GnSssoZ50

If you are a trumpet player or a chemist, I think what makes someone excel at said activity is there almost OCD desire to figure out stuff they cant do. Its fun for them to keep trying and failing, but instead of giving up they figure out what is making them not do said task,
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Old 07-08-2014, 03:35 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

2 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year, for 14 years is 10,220 hours.

I usually hear 10 years, rather than 10,000 hours given as the time it takes to master a physical skill.

Both numbers seem pretty arbitrary to me.
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Old 07-08-2014, 03:46 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

I think it is possible to practice too much. Too much stress on the body and tendonitis or some other illness starts.
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Old 07-08-2014, 03:49 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

I've practised tons more than 10,000 hours and I've seen videos of 10 year olds that kick my sorry drumming arse. It depends on the way you practice, and natural talent of course.
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Old 07-08-2014, 03:49 AM
Grolubao Grolubao is offline
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

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Originally Posted by BillRayDrums View Post
There is no magic number. Ever. And you should never keep track of your practice. "I gotta practice for an hour or else I'll suck"... no... practice when it feels right and good. Cease practicing when you've had enough. Drummers drum and placing merit upon time spent an be counterproductive.

Now it's OK to set up an hour a day to practice and fill it, but some days you'll do 20 minutes, others 45 and other days you'll exceed that hour.

As for me I practice constantly, even when I'm nowhere near a drumkit. It's all in one's head.
I don't really agree about that. I believe it's really important to track it down and count how much you practiced. Also, not sure for you but surely for me it's way more fun to practice songs than to work on my singles or doubles, but since I religiously started practicing my technique chops 1h everyday guess what: I progressed a lot, even though I think it's boring, but it's a necessary evil to get me where I want to.
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Old 07-08-2014, 04:01 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Having 'mastered' a skill implies that it can't be done any better.

I'm not sure I agree with that concept at all.
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Old 07-08-2014, 04:58 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

I can't really imagine how they arrive at statements like this:

"In music, it (practicing) was a 21% difference"

I made a topic the other week about how I wasn't sure I'd improved from 3 years ago, until just recently. If I have this much trouble assessing my own improvement then I can't see how they can quantify performance skills like that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmike View Post
Practice makes perfect but only if it's perfect practice.
This comment really hit home with me, and like everyone here is saying - mindless practice won't get you the results of thoughtful, analytical, systematic (etc etc) practice.

I think one thing we can say with certainty is that the more you practice the more likely you are to improve.
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Old 07-08-2014, 07:25 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

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Originally Posted by Dre25 View Post
... mindless practice won't get you the results of thoughtful, analytical, systematic (etc etc) practice.

I think one thing we can say with certainty is that the more you practice the more likely you are to improve.
That's pretty well it.

All playing is good, and nothing beats playing daily. Still, if your grip and stroke are unstable then it can take an awful lot of practice to achieve something that a player with sound fundamentals can pick up much more quickly and easily. I'm speaking from experience.
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Old 07-08-2014, 08:20 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

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Originally Posted by Anon La Ply View Post
I've practised tons more than 10,000 hours and I've seen videos of 10 year olds that kick my sorry drumming arse. It depends on the way you practice, and natural talent of course.
^ this.

I used to practice pretty intensely and often, but you wouldn't know it.

The amount spread out over time, consistency, injuries, physical attributes, mental understanding of what you're practicing, all play into it.
And Dre nailed it:
Quote:
mindless practice won't get you the results of thoughtful, analytical, systematic (etc etc) practice
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  #12  
Old 07-08-2014, 11:27 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

The fact is the "10,000 hours of practice" pc. from Harvard was a very general guideline, and the researcher(s), iirc, clearly stated that.
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  #13  
Old 07-08-2014, 11:55 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Its tosh, isn't it?

Too many factors to take into consideration. Like, natural ability, some were simply born to play the drums and were lucky enough to want to play in the first place. Motor skills, some have great hand eye coordination, good natural manual dexterity. A natural sense of rhythm, some don't.

Also, what do you count as practice? Playing endless rudiments, working on new songs, just playing? Are we going to have to produce a "Drumming Diary", when going to an audition, showing beyond doubt that we have done the required 10,000 hours of practice before we can even have a shot at playing with local Punk band.

As I say its tosh. Do you like the way a drummer plays or not, that's all that counts.

I suspect surveys, and random figures like these, are produced by music institutions to drum up (sic) more business.
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  #14  
Old 07-08-2014, 12:56 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

All generalizations are false.

;-D

The "10,000 hour" or "10 year" mastery/expertise timescale is indeed arbitrary. Yes, there are other factors which significantly impact attaining mastery, many of which are mentioned in this thread. Even more detail can be found here.
Even so, to dismiss it as "tosh" is irresponsible. It's a marker along the road to mastery.

Also, chalk me up as another who has a very definite idea of what constitutes "practice". Just playing for fun is not practice. Ever. At all. Performance is not practice. Ever. At all.

Practice must have structure. It must have clearly-defined near-term and long-term goals. For example, sitting down to work double-bass speed through repetition of specific, planned exercises is practice which leads to mastery. Sitting down to learn Metallica's "One" is not.

Can you get better by jamming or playing along to recorded material? Sure. But - surely you saw that coming - you'll get better faster if you stop being random and start planning how you're going to improve.

Of course, my definition of practice is narrow, as it only encompasses the development of technical skill. It's internal. In order to develop as a musician you do need to get out of your basement and play with people. To be external. Part of mastery is learning how to put your technical expertise to practical use. As musicians that means playing with other people. Only then can you develop sensitivity and communication.
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  #15  
Old 07-08-2014, 01:59 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dre25 View Post
I can't really imagine how they arrive at statements like this:

"In music, it (practicing) was a 21% difference"

I made a topic the other week about how I wasn't sure I'd improved from 3 years ago, until just recently. If I have this much trouble assessing my own improvement then I can't see how they can quantify performance skills like that.
It's actually worse than that. Not only is there the question of how they quantified it, just look at the other numbers. In sports they claim a mere 18% difference. So are they saying that if I never trained (practiced) as a distance runner that my personal best half marathon would be just 18% slower? Without practice I wouldn't have been able to finish at all, let alone be anywhere near my time.

Or how about their stated 1% difference in "professions"? So a non-practicing lawyer or doctor is just as good as one who does practice?

Lord Kelvin once made a comment that if you can't attach a number to something then you have incomplete knowledge of it. The flip is also true, namely that just because you attached a number to something is no indication that the number is meaningful. It's easy to come up with bullsh!t statistics, advertisers and lobbyists do it all the time.

And I must admit that I never took the 10000 hours thing literally. I always took it to mean "it takes a very long time of focused attention".
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  #16  
Old 07-08-2014, 03:08 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Wow, this post makes me think that many of you have taken the fun right out of this whole thing. To sit and plan out practice routines, then schedule that time in your day, then keep a running diary of the things you worked on. That sounds an aweful lot like work to me. Now obviously some of you are professional drummers and drumming IS work, so that kind of attention is necessary to keep a roof over your head. But for a weekend warrior like myself to put that kind of thought into something I do for fun seems like adding a second job.
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  #17  
Old 07-08-2014, 03:57 PM
Grolubao Grolubao is offline
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

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Originally Posted by eclipseownzu View Post
Wow, this post makes me think that many of you have taken the fun right out of this whole thing. To sit and plan out practice routines, then schedule that time in your day, then keep a running diary of the things you worked on. That sounds an aweful lot like work to me. Now obviously some of you are professional drummers and drumming IS work, so that kind of attention is necessary to keep a roof over your head. But for a weekend warrior like myself to put that kind of thought into something I do for fun seems like adding a second job.
For me it is definitely a second job to me regarding technique, but no pain no gain...
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  #18  
Old 07-08-2014, 04:11 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

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Originally Posted by Grolubao View Post
For me it is definitely a second job to me regarding technique, but no pain no gain...
Me too. Personally, I like planning out my routines and tracking my progress. Gives me a tangible sense of improvement which can be difficult to quantify.

There are so many components to playing drumming (reading/writing charts, foot control, hand speed, dynamics, etc.) that just sitting down on the drums without any preconceived notions as to what I wanted to do seems to me like I would miss out on a lot. Kind of like going to the gym or the grocery store withouit a plan as to what I needed to do.
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  #19  
Old 07-08-2014, 04:45 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

One of the worst things you can do is practice when you are extremely to mildly tired. You will unconsciously change your pattern or stroke, in drumming, and reinforce bad behaviour. Make your practice routine a quality one and not a quantity one.
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Old 07-08-2014, 04:49 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Quote:
Originally Posted by eclipseownzu View Post
Wow, this post makes me think that many of you have taken the fun right out of this whole thing. To sit and plan out practice routines, then schedule that time in your day, then keep a running diary of the things you worked on. That sounds an aweful lot like work to me. Now obviously some of you are professional drummers and drumming IS work, so that kind of attention is necessary to keep a roof over your head. But for a weekend warrior like myself to put that kind of thought into something I do for fun seems like adding a second job.
I don't keep a diary but I work on different things and I have researched or figured out my own practice methods in order to explore each area that I want to work on... so what?

Any worthwhile drummer does this, or did this.

The guys that learn songs note for note so they can post youtube videos, and then go through all the production of making the video - that would be a bit exhausting for me.
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  #21  
Old 07-08-2014, 05:36 PM
Grolubao Grolubao is offline
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

I keep track of bpm's, time spent, etc:

http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/a...1&d=1404833677

http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/a...1&d=1404833653
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  #22  
Old 07-08-2014, 05:45 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

OK Dre, the time has come. What exactly is that pole dancing creature in your avatar, some manner of mutated chicken?

I don't keep a drumming journal/diary but I do like to practice versus only playing. It might be something from a book I am working through or something I heard or something I just thought up. It's just a question of trying to get better, more competent. The more I do, the more I can do. And who doesn't want to go beyond where they are currently? The person who doesn't is already dead.
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Old 07-08-2014, 06:15 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Quote:
Originally Posted by STXBob View Post
All generalizations are false.

;-D

The "10,000 hour" or "10 year" mastery/expertise timescale is indeed arbitrary. Yes, there are other factors which significantly impact attaining mastery, many of which are mentioned in this thread. Even more detail can be found here.
Even so, to dismiss it as "tosh" is irresponsible. It's a marker along the road to mastery.

Also, chalk me up as another who has a very definite idea of what constitutes "practice". Just playing for fun is not practice. Ever. At all. Performance is not practice. Ever. At all.

Practice must have structure. It must have clearly-defined near-term and long-term goals. For example, sitting down to work double-bass speed through repetition of specific, planned exercises is practice which leads to mastery. Sitting down to learn Metallica's "One" is not.

Can you get better by jamming or playing along to recorded material? Sure. But - surely you saw that coming - you'll get better faster if you stop being random and start planning how you're going to improve.

Of course, my definition of practice is narrow, as it only encompasses the development of technical skill. It's internal. In order to develop as a musician you do need to get out of your basement and play with people. To be external. Part of mastery is learning how to put your technical expertise to practical use. As musicians that means playing with other people. Only then can you develop sensitivity and communication.
Irresponsible, Me???? I'l have you know i'm a drummer in a Rock and Roll band, being less than responsible goes with the territory. Also I have a doctors note explaining I have an aversion to formal learning, so there.
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  #24  
Old 07-08-2014, 06:46 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

I passed 10,000 hours decades ago and I still have a very long way to go to. I think the
number 10,000 might be useful to a beginner to realize that if you want to become a really good player, it's gonna' take a lot of practice and dedication. Fortunately, I've had a lot of fun
playing along the way as I continue the lifelong journey of becoming a good musician.
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  #25  
Old 07-08-2014, 06:46 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Great thread. It's good to have a discussion about this.

There are so many factors at play, many of which have already been mentioned. One that has not is personality: some people like and benefit from structured learning, others from unstructured learning. It's all good, if on the long term your skills improve at a pace you are happy with.

The other thing is comfort zone vs just outside your comfort zone vs frustration zone... 2 hours of play in your comfort zone is good as practice if you want to reinforce things you already know. This can be good, but you won't learn new stuff.
2 hours if practice just outside of your comfort zone, however, will help with learning new things, enhance your skills.

There is also the enjoyment element. If you love it, you'll do more of it and likely improve, what ever your natural talent is.

The 10,000 hours or 10 years is almost symbolic, saying, it takes a long time to get good and don't expect miracles after 2 weeks, or months or years...

Whenever I feel like I'm not making progress, I remember how much I sucked at French after 8 months, and how it was possible to become nearly fluent after 4 years... So never underestimate the power of perseverance :)
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  #26  
Old 07-08-2014, 06:53 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

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Originally Posted by JimFiore View Post
OK Dre, the time has come. What exactly is that pole dancing creature in your avatar, some manner of mutated chicken?
Yes, totally... I'd like to know, too. I was guessing a bear?
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  #27  
Old 07-08-2014, 07:02 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

I suspect people who improve rapidly don't find practice tedious. Practice, in fact, makes them feel that they have improved, but not ... quite ... enough. It's like eating Doritos. You always want one more, even though your hands are coated up to the wrist in Dorito dust.

I think it also depends on your age at which you try to master something. If you put 10,000 hours of effort into doing something as a teenager or twentysomething, you are by nature inclined to develop the muscles and make the mental connections more rapidly.

I am definitely NOT saying it is impossible to master something the older you get. I feel intuitively that you have to put in more effort when you are older in order to achieve the same rate of improvement.
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Old 07-08-2014, 09:40 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

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Yes, totally... I'd like to know, too. I was guessing a bear?
To me Dres avatar seemed a mix of a pig (body) with some sort of catfish (face).

Him being from OZ, is it a wombat?

oh ya, practice is good.
i think for real progress it has to be work, but not too much work.
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Old 07-08-2014, 09:49 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Quote:
Originally Posted by WaitForItDrummer View Post
Great thread. It's good to have a discussion about this.

There are so many factors at play, many of which have already been mentioned. One that has not is personality: some people like and benefit from structured learning, others from unstructured learning. It's all good, if on the long term your skills improve at a pace you are happy with.

The other thing is comfort zone vs just outside your comfort zone vs frustration zone... 2 hours of play in your comfort zone is good as practice if you want to reinforce things you already know. This can be good, but you won't learn new stuff.
2 hours if practice just outside of your comfort zone, however, will help with learning new things, enhance your skills.

There is also the enjoyment element. If you love it, you'll do more of it and likely improve, what ever your natural talent is.

The 10,000 hours or 10 years is almost symbolic, saying, it takes a long time to get good and don't expect miracles after 2 weeks, or months or years...

Whenever I feel like I'm not making progress, I remember how much I sucked at French after 8 months, and how it was possible to become nearly fluent after 4 years... So never underestimate the power of perseverance :)
Well said, WFID.

It's a fat brown chicken who's clearly confused as to what it's supposed to be doing. It's simultaneously cute and stupid.
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  #30  
Old 07-09-2014, 12:38 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Quote:
Originally Posted by eclipseownzu View Post
Wow, this post makes me think that many of you have taken the fun right out of this whole thing. To sit and plan out practice routines, then schedule that time in your day, then keep a running diary of the things you worked on. That sounds an aweful lot like work to me. Now obviously some of you are professional drummers and drumming IS work, so that kind of attention is necessary to keep a roof over your head. But for a weekend warrior like myself to put that kind of thought into something I do for fun seems like adding a second job.
That's the only way to become a serious player, in some cases...two jobs. ;)
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  #31  
Old 07-09-2014, 01:38 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Quote:
Originally Posted by eclipseownzu View Post
Wow, this post makes me think that many of you have taken the fun right out of this whole thing. To sit and plan out practice routines, then schedule that time in your day, then keep a running diary of the things you worked on. That sounds an aweful lot like work to me. Now obviously some of you are professional drummers and drumming IS work, so that kind of attention is necessary to keep a roof over your head. But for a weekend warrior like myself to put that kind of thought into something I do for fun seems like adding a second job.
Your insistence on mutual exclusivity is arbitrary and unnecessary.

"Fun" and "work" are entirely subjective. For me at least, I don't have fun when I suck at whatever it is I'm trying to do. For me, practice is part of ramping up until I get to the point where I can start having fun.

Anything worth pursuing is worth pursuing to the best of one's ability. If I'm going to drop cash and time on a pursuit, yer durn tootin' I'm going to put some effort in as well.

I don't plan out every second of practice time. I *do* decide what I'm going to work on before I begin. Then I look up exercises (if I don't have them already in my library/brain). Then I stretch, because I don't want repetitive-stress injuries. Then I sit down and practice what I've decided to work on.

Lately I've been working my bass drum technique. It's been actually fun experiencing my foot waking up! :-D http://youtu.be/hxoms7LsXDo

Quote:
Originally Posted by WaitForItDrummer
The other thing is comfort zone vs just outside your comfort zone vs frustration zone... 2 hours of play in your comfort zone is good as practice if you want to reinforce things you already know. This can be good, but you won't learn new stuff.
2 hours if practice just outside of your comfort zone, however, will help with learning new things, enhance your skills.
THIS. This is what I'm saying about playing vs. practice. Practice is deliberately designed to take you outside your comfort zone - or at least it *should* be, if you want it to be effective.

I usually structure my practice so that the beginning/warmup reinforces stuff I already know. I can coast on that, concentrate on good kinesthetics, that sort of thing. Then I'll work on something new until I learn it well enough to drill it. That new thing is outside my comfort zone.

To continue the bass-drum example, I'm learning heel-toe. Painfully and slowly, because I really suck at it right now. It's quite a way outside my comfort zone, but not quite to the frustration zone. At least not anymore.

Which it's important to talk about. ;-) There's a gray area between "outside the comfort zone" and "frustration zone," and you won't know you've crossed into the latter until it's too late. You don't learn anything when you hit frustration.

Anyway, enough rambling. ;-)
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  #32  
Old 07-09-2014, 02:18 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

10,000 hours practicing sloppy singles in front of the TV will make you a master at playing sloppy singles in front of the TV.
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Old 07-09-2014, 05:15 PM
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eclipseownzu eclipseownzu is offline
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

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Originally Posted by STXBob View Post
Your insistence on mutual exclusivity is arbitrary and unnecessary.
Of course its arbitrary, its my opinion, thats the definition of arbitrary.

As to your point, I actually agree with you. My post was more an insight into my personality than a referendum on how other drummers should practice. Its the reason I have only taken one lesson in my life. The minute I sit down behind the kit and think "I HAVE to work on this lesson" I lose all interest in playing.
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Old 07-10-2014, 01:08 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

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Originally Posted by eclipseownzu View Post
Of course its arbitrary, its my opinion, thats the definition of arbitrary.
I didn't say your opinion was arbitrary. I said your insistence that work =/= fun was arbitrary, then explained how, for some people, the work is part of the fun.

/pedant :-P

Quote:
As to your point, I actually agree with you. My post was more an insight into my personality than a referendum on how other drummers should practice. Its the reason I have only taken one lesson in my life. The minute I sit down behind the kit and think "I HAVE to work on this lesson" I lose all interest in playing.
If that's how you operate, and it works for you, awesome! Different strokes for different folks, and all that.

What got my attention was when you said, "Wow, this post makes me think that many of you have taken the fun right out of this whole thing." That implies that people who work and practice can't have fun, because for you structured practice isn't fun. What I'm trying to say is that's not the case. Your approach and mine are different, yet we're still both having fun playing drums! In fact, I'll be having fun playing drums tonight at an open mic night. :-D
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Old 07-10-2014, 01:40 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

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Originally Posted by eclipseownzu View Post
Of course its arbitrary, its my opinion, thats the definition of arbitrary.

As to your point, I actually agree with you. My post was more an insight into my personality than a referendum on how other drummers should practice. Its the reason I have only taken one lesson in my life. The minute I sit down behind the kit and think "I HAVE to work on this lesson" I lose all interest in playing.
+1 If its fun, its fun, regardless of the fact you may get paid for it.

Lessons and formal learning?......too much like school.
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Old 07-10-2014, 01:54 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

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I didn't say your opinion was arbitrary. I said your insistence that work =/= fun was arbitrary, then explained how, for some people, the work is part of the fun.
If you think it's difficult getting the whole work/fun dichotomy worked out for drumming, considering the following.

I have lots of friends who, like me, are competitive distance runners (way more than the number of drummer friends I have, at least in meat-space). We have been known to go to a local track and do several 1200 meter repeats at 5k race pace. These are exhausting. You cannot speak while doing them. It's 3.5 to 4 minutes of very hard effort followed by maybe 3 minutes of light jogging recovery. Or we might do a 16 to 20 mile "long run". Or perhaps a couple dozen 200 to 400 meter near sprints. All with appropriate warm up and cool down, of course.

Perhaps perversely, we all call these things fun.

People ask, "Why would you do that?" Simple. We each want to get better. The fact that these things are difficult and exhausting does not matter. It's simply a requirement for getting better. Consequently, anything that is seen as promoting this end is viewed as fun. Of course, after you've done this for a while, the freedom and power associated with being able to do these things is a reward unto itself. Nothing like getting out there and flying.
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Old 07-10-2014, 06:13 PM
mikel mikel is offline
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

You a runner Jim? Nice one.

I had to give it up and start cycling due to a chronic knee injury. Tuesday nights were the big club night and our group would trash each other during whatever session we were doing. Extreme pain, but great fun. Some, me included, feed off the pain, are almost addicted to the punishment. We used to get more nervous before Tuesday training night than before a race.

After training? A shower then off to the pub for the best tasting pint ever. I miss those sessions now.
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Old 07-10-2014, 08:36 PM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Always good to meet a fellow runner. What were your favorite distances? Road, track or XC?

We had a rule about not letting workouts turn into races. "Never leave your race at practice". I used to get so anal about this that I would calculate everyone's ideal workout paces (based on their recent race times) and then figure out corresponding time offsets in the various lanes. So the slowest guys would be in lane 1 and the fastest in the outer lanes. This way we'd all start and end the repeat together, going for constant time rather than constant distance. This only works if the group is fairly close in ability. At the time we were generally spanning mid 16 to upper 17 for 5k road so it all worked well.

But on race day everyone knew everyone wanted to beat everyone else and there was never any animosity. We'd help each other if we could.
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Old 07-11-2014, 04:55 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

Running for the sake of running just seems so pointless to me. Why not play a game of tip or give athletic looking strangers a wedgie, then see if you can outrun them?

Seriously though, I don't want to put my drummin' legs through all of that, I think it would catch up with me in old age.

I would say the creature is a chicken, minus the beak. I try not to think about it.
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Old 07-11-2014, 05:04 AM
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Default Re: 10.000 hours of practice is not the magic number

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Originally Posted by BeyondClarity View Post
10,000 hours practicing sloppy singles in front of the TV will make you a master at playing sloppy singles in front of the TV.
But hey, I'm good at sloppy singles in front of the TV!

As long as the football game is on.
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