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  #281  
Old 08-16-2009, 03:47 AM
PeterPF13 PeterPF13 is offline
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

after 3 days of tuning my snare i finally got a sound i want from it :) 2 1/2's turns on batter and 1 turn on the resonant side. how tight/loose do u guys tune in turns? dont tell me in tama tension watch please lol dont have that anymore. used to have that couple years ago when i first started waste of money. in turns please :)
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  #282  
Old 08-16-2009, 10:38 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

PeterPF13,

I used to do that.
That's a LOT of tension for a non-marching type snare drum.
Don't be surprised if you end up stripping a rod or breaking a lug, especially if you're using a generic drum.
Back in my day, Remo CS black dots were all the rage (no ps3 back then).
I'd crank 'em up to around 2-2.5 turns.
On the snare, I'd generally use a coated Ambassador, because I did occassionally sit down and put some time in with brushes.
I loved the feel! The sound was resonant but bright with a pronounced attack.
20+ (+++) years later, I see now that I was putting a lot of undue stress on my drums and that a slightly looser tension actually makes for a more pleasant sound.
These days, I like coated single ply, non-dotted, heads on all of my drums and I pull them to about 1.5 turns, then I tune out any distortion that may be present.
At this point in time, all of my tuning is based on that 1.5 turn starting point, then I augment from there, to better suit that particular drum.
The BD is a little looser, the snare drum is a little tighter.
Works for me.



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  #283  
Old 08-16-2009, 04:15 PM
PeterPF13 PeterPF13 is offline
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

ok ill try playing with a little less on the batter maybe down to 2 turns, its not really that tight on my drum. i got remo weatherking coated amassador on batter and ambassador snare on reso
EDIT. so pretty much i took off from the batter and put it into reso side from 2.5 batter and 1 reso to 1.75 batter and 1.5 reso
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  #284  
Old 08-17-2009, 08:59 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Peter,

Glad I could be of help.
So how do you like the change?
If there's sustain issues, place your wallet on the batter head, resting against the hoop.
Does a nice job of drying out a snare drum.


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  #285  
Old 10-15-2009, 05:00 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Ok boys, First of all I'm new here, but not new to drumming so we'll see how this goes.

So my snare's been acting up lately, I have a mapex mars series snare with a remo ebony pinstripe batter head (brand spankin new ;) ), and a stock remo reso head (couple bumps, scratches). My snare is a stock snare, plastic straps. I have my reso as tight as ever, and my batter head is just a little tighter.

But my snare sounds bad. Really bad. It has this high pitched ring whenever I hit it that lingers for a while after, and this tone makes my snare buzz instantly and then hiss for a couple seconds.

I've tried retuning it, but I can't seem to find that sweet spot. I've tried loosening and tightening everything. I might just have to find someone who can show me what I'm doing wrong. This drum has never given me trouble before, at least none that I couldn't fix, so I'm assuming that I'm missing some key step.

Thanks,
Anything helps.
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  #286  
Old 10-16-2009, 10:11 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Have you tried adjusting the snare tension, along with the head tension?
Which head are you tightening and loosening, or do you mean you're doing that with both heads?
I'd say your answer lies in working with the snare side head and the snare tension / placement.

JMHO.



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  #287  
Old 11-17-2009, 03:44 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Hey everyone, I'm new here and somewhat new to when it comes to tuning a snare drum. Right now I have a 14x5.5 snare drum (Ludwig) with a remo black x batter side and a reso head that came with it, I'm trying to get a loud, quick "crack!" sound out if, and get rid of all overtunes if possible. So basically what I'm asking is, how do you do it? Haha
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  #288  
Old 11-17-2009, 03:45 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

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Originally Posted by Dipschmidt View Post
Hey everyone, I'm new here and somewhat new to when it comes to tuning a snare drum. Right now I have a 14x5.5 snare drum (Ludwig) with a remo black x batter side and a reso head that came with it, I'm trying to get a loud, quick "crack!" sound out if, and get rid of all overtunes if possible. So basically what I'm asking is, how do you do it? Haha
Google Drum tuning Bible
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  #289  
Old 11-17-2009, 03:56 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

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Originally Posted by Dipschmidt View Post
Hey everyone, I'm new here and somewhat new to when it comes to tuning a snare drum. Right now I have a 14x5.5 snare drum (Ludwig) with a remo black x batter side and a reso head that came with it, I'm trying to get a loud, quick "crack!" sound out if, and get rid of all overtunes if possible. So basically what I'm asking is, how do you do it? Haha
Definitely check out GD's suggestion. All you'll EVER need to know there.

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Originally Posted by GRUNTERSDAD View Post
Google Drum tuning Bible
Look at this one too.........http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qxm3QunDjUs
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  #290  
Old 11-17-2009, 04:29 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

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Originally Posted by Dipschmidt View Post
I'm trying to get a loud, quick "crack!" sound out if, and get rid of all overtunes if possible. So basically what I'm asking is, how do you do it? Haha
As a quick tip, get the thinnest snare-side resonant head possible to accomplish this. As far as I know the Remo Diplomat snare-side and Evans Hazy 200 are the thinnest available. I'm sure Aquarian and other head manufacturers make heads in this same weight but I'm not sure what they're called.
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  #291  
Old 11-17-2009, 04:53 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

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Originally Posted by G-MaN91 View Post
k, so everytime i hit my small rack tom, it makes the snare wires buzz. how do you tune the small rack tom, or snare, so that doesnt happen?
This happened to me a couple of times, but one thing that always fixed it was tightening the snare wires as much as possible.
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  #292  
Old 11-17-2009, 05:00 AM
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This happened to me a couple of times, but one thing that always fixed it was tightening the snare wires as much as possible.
Careful not to choke the snare wires though. A better option is to ensure different tunings on each drum to avoid the sympathetic buzz. (It's in the tuning bible too Dips)
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  #293  
Old 11-17-2009, 05:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Pocket-full-of-gold View Post
Careful not to choke the snare wires though. A better option is to ensure different tunings on each drum to avoid the sympathetic buzz. (It's in the tuning bible too Dips)
It's funny though because whenever I tuned the snare differently to get rid of that buzz, it would get rid of the buzzing sound, but the sound of the snare would be awful.
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  #294  
Old 11-17-2009, 05:20 AM
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It's funny though because whenever I tuned the snare differently to get rid of that buzz, it would get rid of the buzzing sound, but the sound of the snare would be awful.
Just a tweak of either drum should be enough seperation to stop it. Do a search on "Snare Buzz".....there's some 'tuning masters' on these forums with some excellent ideas on this and just about every other tuning issue I've ever encountered. Wish this site existed years ago!!

Tuning in itself is an art form though, and one that takes many years to master I'd suggest. I know I'm not there yet....some drums still take me a while to get where I want them.
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  #295  
Old 11-17-2009, 05:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Pocket-full-of-gold View Post
Tuning in itself is an art form though, and one that takes many years to master I'd suggest. I know I'm not there yet....some drums still take me a while to get where I want them.
You got that right, if I didn't have my DrumDial (best piece of equipment to have, an essential for a drummer) my toms would sound absolutely terrible.
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  #296  
Old 11-17-2009, 11:16 PM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Dipschmidt,

You could also try loosening the 4 tuning rods that surround the snare itself.
Make up the tension by pulling the rest of the rods a little tighter.


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  #297  
Old 11-20-2009, 09:22 AM
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Dipschmidt, and anyone else who's curious...

Call me "ol' Skool", but I really feel no one needs any kind of "device" to tune a head (aside from a tuning key).
All you need to do is to put in a little time and effort and you'll get it down.
To aid you in this quest of ridding yourself of the dreaded "Drum Dial Dependency", I offer this tutorial.
Nothing fancy, just how to change out a head, with some tuning advice thrown in.
Anyway, read through it and see if there isn't something in there that might help you.
Been workin' for me for almost 30 years now.

...ready? Here we go...

There's a few ways to "break in" a new head.
Over the years, I've tried various methods.
The way I'm about to describe has worked very well for me and is a much faster way of "breaking in" a head than most others:

1) Remove the old head.

2) Take a piece of cloth (old T-shirt works well) and give a quick wipe to the bearing edge, the underside of the collar and the glue ring of the new head and the underside of the hoop.

3) Place the new head on the drum and spin it on the shell.
Make sure it fits on and spins easily.
If not, return the head and get another.
If it does, continue...

4) Place the hoop on the head, insert the tension rods, tighten all rods finger tight (I like to use both hands, turning the 2 rods that are on the exact opposite sides of each other at the same time).

5) Take your tuning key and start applying tension to the head by turning the tension rods.
Use a STAR PATTERN to tension the head, so that it torques down evenly.
If you're drum is a 6 lug drum, look at the end of the drum you're working on and situate the lugs so that you have one lug looking right at you and the one opposite is looking straight away from you.
If you play "connect the dots" with the other 4 lugs, it should make a "box" shape.

6) Now imagine the face of a clock superimposed over the drum, with the number 12 being the lug looking away from you and the number 6 being the lug looking straight at you.
The rest of the numbers on the imaginary clock will be fairly close to the following lug positions;
The lug in the upper right hand side will be "2", the lug in the lower right hand side will be "4", the lug on the lower left hand side will be "8" and the lug on the upper left hand side will be "10".

7) Tighten the head down in 2 steps, or "patterns".
The first one will be:
12,6,2,8,4,10.
The second one will be:
6,12,4,10,2,8.
Repeat these patterns, in the order I just laid out, placing one complete 360 degree revolution on each rod (which I call "a turn") the first time around, then use 180 degree revolutions (which I call a "1/2 turn") there after, until you've put 3 turns on each of the tension rods.

8 ) At this point, the head is evenly tensioned and fairly taught.
You may have heard some cracking or "popping" at this point, and that's fine.
Place the drum on the floor with the head you're working on looking up.
Now, place the heel of one of your hands in the center of the head and give one very hard, sharp, quick push.
DON'T BE A WIMP HERE! PUT YOUR WEIGHT INTO IT!
You may have heard more cracking at this point or you may not hear more cracking at this point.
Either is fine.

9) Now pick the drum off the floor and place it on a soft surface with the end you're working on looking up.
That old T-shirt (folded) you used to wipe the drum off with in the beginning would work fine.
If your bed has a comforter on it, that would be perfect.
The soft surface will completely muffle the other head so that you only hear the head you are tuning, which brings us to...

10) Remove all of the tension from the head you're working on.
Use the star patterns I laid out in step #7, until you feel the tension on the rods get pretty slack.
By that time, you probably won't need to use the key anymore.
Keep loosening the tension until the rods are no longer tensioning the head (look for an obvious gap between the head of the rod and the hoop).

11) Start tightening down on the head again with the rods, using the star patterns I showed in step #7.
This time, you will tension the head to whatever setting gives you the sound you're looking for.
Once you start to feel a little tension on the head, start tapping it in the middle after completing each star pattern, to see if the head is tensioned where you want it.

12) Once you reach that point, stop tightening and tap on the head at each point that corressponds with a tension rod, about 1/4" in from the edge.
You can use a stick or your finger, it really doesn't matter.

13) Tap each point once and listen to the drum.

14) If you hear a nice, even sound that is the same pitch at all the points, you're finished tuning this head and you’ll need to flip the tom over and perform the same procedure on the other head (ONLY if you're changing that one, too. If you're not, don't worry about it). The head is now tuned to where you want it to be and it should hold that tuning for as long as you want it to. At this point, with each head sounding good on its own, you can skip to step #21.

15) IF you hear a "wobbly" or "uneven" sound coming from some of those points, then the head is not tensioned evenly.
The sound you're hearing is known as distortion and is caused by the head creating several dissonant frequencies at once, due to the fact that it's seeing different tension in different spots of the head.
Dissonant frequencies are ones that do not harmonize with each other, thus resulting in the distorted sound you hear.

16) At this point, you'll need to "fine tune" the head.

17) Check around the head and see if that distorted sound isn't more prevelent at certain points more than others.
If so, try correcting those first.

18) Correct by tightening that tension rod, slightly.
Tap on the head once, at that tension rod, and tighten the rod as the sound decays.
You shouldn't have to turn the rod more than 1/4 of turn at a time.
If you do, then stop and tap the head at the rod that is on the exact opposite side of the drum and see if you don't hear the distorted sound coming from that one.
If so, do the same thing until the sound "evens out".

19) Tap around the head again and see if the distortion is still heard.

20) If so, do the same procedure at each of those rods as well.

21) Once you have everything sounding nice and "even" pick the drum up and hold it in your hand BY THE TOM BRACKET. NEVER HOLD IT BY THE RIM (you can also cradle it in your hand, if there’s no bracket on the tom).
The combination of the weight of the drum, your grip and the thickness of the hoop may be enough to throw the head "out of tune" at this point, if the drum is held by its rim.

22) Hit the middle of the drum while holding it up.

23) If it sounds "good", you're done.
If you still get that distortion, set the drum back down on the soft surface it was on and tap around the head again to see if you didn't miss anything.

24) If it sounds good, flip the drum over and tap around the edge of the other head.
Chances are it may have been out of tune and you didn't realize it until now.

25) If the distortion is heard with either head, correct those problems and perform step #22 again.

26) If, when you hold up the drum, you STILL get that distorted sound, go back and perform steps 23-25 and check the heads again.
If everything sounds good on it's own, then your heads are "out of phase" with each other (i.e., each head is tuned to a frequency that is dissonant to the other).
At this point, you'll have to pick one of those heads and retune it to a different pitch that will put the heads back "into phase".
Remember, the batter head sets the tone of the drum, the resonant head sets the amount of resonance of the drum.
The change will most likely not have to be that drastic and the sound of your drum may not change all that much.

27) Make the correction, perform step # 22 and see how the drum sounds.


...If everything sounds good, NOW you're done!

Chances are very good that you will NOT have to perform all 27 steps.
I just wanted to cover some basic problems you might encounter while trying to tune up the drum.

One of the most important points in tuning a drum, that most drummers overlook, is the "cracking" procedure.
You MUST find a way to form that head to the bearing edge, and stress the glue that may be holding the head material to the glue ring, or else you will stand a very good chance of encountering (unneccessary) problems with getting the head tuned up.
You can crank up the tension and leave it sit for a week, or use a hair dryer on it, or simply push down on the center of the head (like I do!).
Any of these procedures will form the head to the bearing edge (leaving it sit for a week works the worst, trust me on this one!).

One thing you don't wanna do is to push in on the SNARE SIDE head (that's the clear one on the bottom of the snare drum). It's too thin and doing that will leave a large depression in the head (it won't sound good).
Those heads are so thin, that you can just slap them on and tension them to where ever you like.


Hope you found this helpful.



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  #298  
Old 12-07-2009, 12:06 PM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

How do i get a nice cracking sound?
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  #299  
Old 01-22-2010, 04:45 PM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Hi guys. Can you help me how to get a Steve Jordan snare sound? I really like the sound of his snare. tight, crack, beautiful rimshot. Any inputs? Thanks!
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  #300  
Old 02-12-2010, 12:06 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

You could tighten up the snares on the snare drum or muffle the snare with duct tape or something. My snare does that too, but I like the legato sound of my snare so i dont tighten it.
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  #301  
Old 02-12-2010, 12:07 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

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Originally Posted by key.hold View Post
Hi guys. Can you help me how to get a Steve Jordan snare sound? I really like the sound of his snare. tight, crack, beautiful rimshot. Any inputs? Thanks!
Tighten up the snare as much as you can would be the only way i think.
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  #302  
Old 03-16-2010, 11:42 PM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Hey, i am looking for the sound that questlove has on his snare, i have a 7x14 yamaha brass with a ambassador on the top and diplomat on the bottom. thanks for any help.
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  #303  
Old 03-17-2010, 05:22 PM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

zeppelin92,

Well, for starters, you could replace the Diplomat on the bottom of your snare drum, with an actual snare side head.
Otherwise, seems to me ?uestlove would be all about samples and electronics.
He's probably got a website. Have you tried writing him and asking?


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  #304  
Old 04-06-2010, 11:11 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

hey
i have an emperor x snare head on a metal snare (14inches by 6inches)
with the stock reso head
im looking for a nice pop sound.....like a tight snare sound

i think i might be using the wrong heads
but if i am some tuning advice would be great

as an alternative though i might go and get a cs snare head.......but wat wuld be a good reso for the head remember im after a pop sound

thanks guys much apprecited////......
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  #305  
Old 04-17-2010, 05:53 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

^ as far as snare-side heads go, I swear by the Remo Hazy Ambassador. It's perfect. Pop, crack, pitch, and sustain all come from the batter head and the drum itself, not so much the bottom head. It's there to rustle the snares.

I tune my snares about medium-high these days, I guess... I have a Pearl Dennis Chambers that's definitely medium-high and it sounds fantastic with the coated Ambassador batter. Otherwise, if anyone cares, check my youtube - www.youtube.com/dwsabianguy
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  #306  
Old 05-21-2010, 03:37 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

^ tighten the snare strands

So I have this problem that i posted in another thread, but i figured the topic belongs here.
I have a brass snare that im trying to tune low using a drum dial but there is this one lug that will not reach the low tension as the other 9 lugs without having to fully detach it from the hoops. For example, i'm trying to tune my snare batter to 85, but one lug will be at 87 (87 when its finger tight, barley on). In order for that lug to get down to 85, i would have to fully take it off. Does anyone know how to resolve this issue? Sorry if its confusing..

Thanks for any advice/info!
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  #307  
Old 06-18-2010, 04:23 PM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Hey guys! :)

Can anyone explain to me what would a pop, or crack sound on a snare would actually sound like? I'm very bad at this sound characteristics thing. Like fat or thin, and such.

I would want a snare sound like Fede Rabaquino's snare. Absolutely amazing!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ys_vS5sOUfo

How do i get my snare to sound like that? It sounds tight, yet it doesnt sound snappy. I absolutely dislike snappy snares. Most snares sound like that when tuned tight, idk why. It sounds like a really thin sound, very snappy and high pitched.
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  #308  
Old 09-09-2010, 09:04 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

14x5.5 Yamaha copper Nouveau. Recently I've gravitated towards a different sound out of my kit and nowhere have I struggled more than with this single drum. It has a great hip-hopish high tuning sound, but I'm struggling to get a lower fat sound out of it. I've tried numerous different tunings. Batter low, reso lower, batter low, reso higher, batter medium, reso medium...if I tune up too much I'm right back into that high crack sound I want to avoid.

Would thicker heads help? I'm afraid you're going to tell me to go back to the drawing board with tuning so if you do; please give some specific advice.

I also tossed some puresound 20 strands on and I'm anything but sold. They rattle a ton when they're off and I play with my hands (sometimes playing with sticks too). This must have something to do with the wires connecting them to the throw-off, but I can't think of a solution. I also think they give an undesirably tinny/brassy sound to the snare. Anyone agree?

Thanks...funkytomtom
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Old 09-09-2010, 09:10 AM
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  #309  
Old 09-15-2010, 08:10 PM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

I have always struggled trying to get a low fat sound out of a brass shell, to me and I could be all wrong here but brass is great for a higher tuned crack sound. I think the sound Fusion is looking for is a more focused sound that wood will give you preferably single ply or stave will give. It can also be achieved with some compression through micing. I mention this alot but I use a walnut stave shell in a free floater and I get a very focused low sound even with medium high tuning. It took alot of experimenting to get a sound I like but if you tune the reso head just above wrinkle and batter medium low you'll get the lowest possible sound with those heads will give, however watch that your snares aren't too tight or you'll blow the bottom head out.
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  #310  
Old 10-13-2010, 11:39 PM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

I just have a Mapex VXB snare drum and I just can't ever seem to get the sound i want from it. I tried tuning endlessly to get that POP sound I'm looking for but it always ends up sounding just either too fat or too ringy if tuned up high. Anyone got any ideas/solutions? Thank You.
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  #311  
Old 10-14-2010, 07:31 PM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

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Originally Posted by funkytomtom View Post
14x5.5 Yamaha copper Nouveau. Recently I've gravitated towards a different sound out of my kit and nowhere have I struggled more than with this single drum. It has a great hip-hopish high tuning sound, but I'm struggling to get a lower fat sound out of it. I've tried numerous different tunings. Batter low, reso lower, batter low, reso higher, batter medium, reso medium...if I tune up too much I'm right back into that high crack sound I want to avoid.

Would thicker heads help? I'm afraid you're going to tell me to go back to the drawing board with tuning so if you do; please give some specific advice.

I also tossed some Puresound 20 strands on and I'm anything but sold. They rattle a ton when they're off and I play with my hands (sometimes playing with sticks too). This must have something to do with the wires connecting them to the throw-off, but I can't think of a solution. I also think they give an undesirably tinny/brassy sound to the snare. Anyone agree?

Thanks...funkytomtom
A few suggestions.

I'm assuming you are trying to hear the sound you want behind your kit and not by listening in front while someone else plays. That's OK but just be aware you hear more high end, snare buzz, and just a plain different sound behind the kit instead in front of it.

Also, I have to assume you are speaking about live playing and not recording. Recording uses all kinds of acoustic and electronic tricks to get that 'fat and low' sound. I've even gotten a (relatively) fat sound out of my 5x13 maple Pork Pie snare when recording

That Yamaha is a really nice drum but usually not chosen for a fat low end. Having said that, players have gotten sounds out of Black Beauty snares where they had to at least account for some of the attributes you are challenged with.

As far as the head is concerned, if you are looking to hear more low end and go for fat, get a good 2 ply coated head and match it with a new snare side head. You haven't mentioned what heads you were using and what condition they were in. That can make a real difference. If what you want to hear is a fat sound to your ears while playing in the practice room, get a really thick head like a Remo Emperor X, Aquarian Focus-X or Evans Hydraulic. That will get much closer to the sound you are looking for. However - once you do that - that's the sound you'll have. Easier to dampen and tune down a head with higher frequencies than to brighten or liven up a head which was made to eliminate high frequencies and ring.

You mention snare rattling while playing with hands and snares off. To me that sounds like the snare wires may be too tight so that they are very close to the bottom head even when turned off. . The fat sound usually includes relatively loose snare wires. Think about it this way: If you tune a snare side head loosely and have really tight snares, the snare wires will bring back some of the tension you try to lose.
Also, a low tuned drum has a more pronounced, low note fundamental (think tom sound as opposed to timbale). When you have looser snares, you let that note 'sing' more. less snare wires would also help. For instance, I have 12 strand Puresounds on my 6 x 14 Pork Pie ash snare. Great sound for organic, big back beats - but not for higher pitched David Garibaldi type snare sensitivity. A trade off but a good one as long as use the right approach. If I put 42 strand snare wires on it and tuned that snare up, I could get closer to DG and a tighter, funk sound. If the brass sound from the Puresound isn't working, try another manufacturer. My Mapex Phosphor Bronze snare didn't like Puresound 16 strand Customs although all my other wood and metal snares did. I put the stock Mapex snare wires back on and it sounded better. FWIW: the black Mapex snare wires look closer to an old, discontinued Puresound lower snare wires line. You could try either their Concert series or get some more standard Gibraltar snare wires and see if they work. If you have an old set of snare wires, try cutting off some of the wires to experiment with less strands. make sure you bend the clipped ends away from the snare head. I try to replace the plastic strands that come with Puresounds with some kind of fabric ribbon (Grosgrain is available at fabric stores). The only drum that still has the strands is my Acro. That's just because the old Luddie strainer only takes strands. That might be a reason to swap it out in the future.

Then finally, after tuning the drum so that it resonates purely at a lower tom tom like pitch, I'd start experimenting with dampening. bits of Moon Gel or gaffer tape - but not so much you lose that tone. Try different areas on the head with different sizes of dampening material.

All that being said, the drum does matter. If you get a walnut 8 x 14 snare (or something like that) you'll have an easier time with low end. I've gotten wonderful fatness out of my Ludwig Acro with a Remo Underside CS Dot head tuned down with 16 strand Puresounds on it. The Acro cost me less than $100 and Acros are all over eBay.


Good luck and HTH

Jim
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Last edited by Shedboyxx; 10-14-2010 at 07:43 PM.
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  #312  
Old 01-09-2011, 09:03 AM
Isaac A Isaac A is offline
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

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Originally Posted by ShaunStruwig View Post
How do i get a nice cracking sound?
i find if you tighten the top head as tight as possible until when you push on it it barely dints, you will get a sharp sound, then you have to adjust the snare strands tightly and tighten the bottom skin too, then adjust the screw on the snare lever to the sound you want, thats how ive always done it :)
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  #313  
Old 03-25-2011, 05:16 PM
ulubatli ulubatli is offline
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Hi everybody,

I am not clear about tuning the resonant snare head. Some people here have suggested that it is better to leave the 4 lugs next to the snare bed looser than the rest of lugs.

How loose?

If you don't tighten those 4 lugs beyond finger tight wouldn't it create wrinkles on the head or make it hard to get an even tone from the reso?
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  #314  
Old 03-26-2011, 03:02 PM
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Elvis Elvis is offline
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Ulubatli,

The detuning of the 4 lugs nearest the snare is an old trick that is accredited to the drum roadie for The Doobie Brothers rock band.
The idea was that by detuning those 4 lugs the snare buzz was kept to a minimum.
That's all it does. Control snare buzz.
For the most part, snare buzz is no big deal. As drummers, we're closest to the snare drum, so we pick up that buzz much more easily than anyone else in the band does (if they even notice in the first place), and certainly most of the auditence have never heard it.
However, when there's a lot of money on the line and you've got your equipment miked up and amplified by thousands of watts and speaker/horn systems that rival office buildings for acreage, then this trick is handy, as some of the buzz may be picked by the mikes.
These days, a lot engineers are fans of uni-directional mikes and not placing a second one under the snare drum.
For the most part, all heads are tuned in the same fashion. This includes the snare side head - you place the new head on the shell, set the ring on the head, install the tuning rods and start twistin'.
The only difference with a snare side head is you don't need to break one in. They're so thin they'll form to the edge when only a modicum of tension is applied.



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  #315  
Old 03-28-2011, 05:24 AM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Modicum - great word! I'll defiantly use that this week.
For the reso side, if you are going to loosen them, I wouldn't go down so far as to have wrinkles appear. That's going to just take a lot of experimentation to get right. I wouldn't worry so much about snare buzz. Try tuning your whole snare higher or lower to get it out of the range of the toms. Also consider something like Puresound's Equalizer series of snare wires. Good luck.
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  #316  
Old 04-15-2011, 08:30 PM
alexsewell alexsewell is offline
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Hey guys, I'm new to Drummerworld, so go easy on me ;)

Just bought batter snare head and reso earlier today and have fitted them. The thing is that I cannot seem to get the crack of the snare without moongel. The sound of the drum: - or what i have tuned it to - seems to be more audible than the crack of the drum. I have tried to tune the reso lower than the batter and vice versa, although I am not too good at tuning either.

Any advice you could give would be brilliant!

Alex
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  #317  
Old 04-15-2011, 08:45 PM
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

I would loosen the wires on that one.
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  #318  
Old 04-16-2011, 06:10 AM
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Pocket-full-of-gold Pocket-full-of-gold is offline
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

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Originally Posted by alexsewell View Post
although I am not too good at tuning either.
Here lies your problem mate. Tuning is an art form and it ain't easy initially. Like every other aspect of your drumming it needs practice and repetition to develop an ear for it. Keep playing around with it....experiment with different head tensions (both batter and reso) and aim to develop a feel for it. It does take a while to become profficient with it, so don't be put off if you struggle to find that magical sound first time round........persistance and experience will pay off.

Have you checked these out:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qxm3QunDjUs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ga8Q12mKYxI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJ9Unab1OzU

It's a tried and tested method employed by thousands of guys the world over. It's excellent for seeing the process first hand. The rest comes down to practice and feel.

Keep at it.
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  #319  
Old 04-16-2011, 12:24 PM
alexsewell alexsewell is offline
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

@ Pocket Full Of Gold,

Thanks a lot man, that's really helped :) got my snare drum sounding crisp now.
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  #320  
Old 05-06-2011, 03:51 PM
sjczildjian sjczildjian is offline
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Default Re: SNARE TUNING

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dipschmidt View Post
This happened to me a couple of times, but one thing that always fixed it was tightening the snare wires as much as possible.
Its sympathetic snare buzz. You can't really get rid of it. Tightening up the snares as tight as you can? I would disagree strongly. Unless of course you like a choked sound, some people do...
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