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  #1  
Old 08-09-2018, 09:37 AM
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Default Sound blending or replacement

As a drummer I love the natural acoustic sounds from a real drum. But more and more I'm seeing people insist in studio that acoustic drum's either be blended with samples or fully replaced with samples. For example, I cut a full albums worth of drum tracks in a home studio. The mic setup was basic but the plan was to just eq things to get a good sound. After cutting the whole album the guitar player insisted that we blend the acoustic drum's with samples because he feels that because it was a basic mic setup with not top of the line mics we did not get a great sound. He likes my playing, just not how the guy recording me did the actual recording. Just to say, he is used to hearing modern metal albums where pretty much all the drums are triggered. After going back and forth with him about it for weeks I finally gave in. So he is manually blending all the drums with samples hit for hit. I'm watching the situation like a hawk to make sure that this whole process does not kill all my dynamics and feel in the tracks. He keeps assuring me that he can get it all sounding right because we are blending and not replacing. The whole process is taking forever. Personally I would rather just do it all through EQing because I think it would sound fine. But since he grew up on triggered drum sounds natural drum sounds, even EQed, sound weak and lacking power to his ears.

How common is sound blending and replacing in most situations currently? Am what I'm currently dealing with pretty normal in the modern music scene in most all styles nowadays? It almost seems that unless a drummer has a very large budget to go into a top of the line studio using top of the line mics in a killer room working with an experienced engineer that this is the way that most people are currently doing it to save money and time. If this is what most modern recording is coming too on the whole it seems that it would just be better to have a good E kit for recording and only take out the acoustic drum's for live show's. As much as I don't like that as a drummer, because of my love for real drum sounds on their own, I have to wonder if that is where things are currently?
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Old 08-09-2018, 12:32 PM
AndeeT AndeeT is offline
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

I feel for you, that is a travesty. I grew up on modern metal music and its taken me years of drumming to realise that isn't at all what drums sound like.

I think a lot of metal fans nowadays don't know what a drum kit actually sounds like. I still love the music, but my love for drums means I will constantly remind myself of how processed those drum sounds are :-/

I'd says its very common in those genres. Couldn't say for others.
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Old 08-09-2018, 02:03 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

This guys sums it up:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bT9LUiWXkyo

Unfortunately it's all too common to use drum samples nowadays. All it does is take the human side out of the playing and make a mockery of good drummers and producers.

.....and yes he is replacing your drum parts with samples, blending? My hairy left one!

How are you meant to pull sample replacements off live? Get someone to replace all of your guitarists parts see how he likes it.

If you listen to anything pre-2000, that's someone playing/singing that part and production was an art form.
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Old 08-09-2018, 03:26 PM
beyondbetrayal beyondbetrayal is offline
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

drums don't sound like recorded and processed drums.. What the audience hears at a show is even different than how a drum set sounds. Gates, compressors, eq, make them sound different than at the throne or in a room..


You want a live natural drum sound? get a few overheads and with good placement it is easy.

You want that modern metal/rock sound mic up all the drums and start putting on effects.

With good drums, good tuning, proper mic placement, a half decent room, and knowledge you can make your current drums sound like samples. The reason people do it is because it is easier, and there is no bleed,out of tune drums etc... Or if your mic placement is WAY off it doesn't even matter.

The more mics you have the more you need to worry about the phase too...... 99% of the time if i hear a bad mix, I can zoom in and literally just see how out of phase it all is...

Once again, mic placement is HUGE for this, then you adjust everything to your main focus drum, (usually a snare) and listen to how thick, big and nice the mix got with that.


but, aside from mixing, yes, samples are used ALL the time, I'd say more often than not.. sometimes a blend to beef it up. sometimes full replacements, sometimes using your own sounds for samples.

taking your toms into a second room, tuning them and recording them at many velocities makes for a nice sample pack. plus if you tune them the same all the time it's a very easy blend.


No matter how good a guy is at mixing there will be some bleed which is a big thing for getting a super clean, super punchy and loud mix.

Samples also make punch ins sound cleaner etc.


I waver on both sides of the fence. my one band I love using natural tones, my other one I feel I might as well get the same advantages of every other metal band out there... I do prefer to blend though and still get some of my natural dynamics and sounds. at the end of the day, When I play a gig i want it to sound like the album and I want the album to sound like ME and not a robot.


If you are using samples and quantizing, then you might as well not even bother playing and just drop in midi packs and put no drummer in the album sleeve though. lol
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Old 08-09-2018, 03:39 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

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Originally Posted by mikyok View Post
This guys sums it up:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bT9LUiWXkyo

Unfortunately it's all too common to use drum samples nowadays. All it does is take the human side out of the playing and make a mockery of good drummers and producers.

Very interesting link thank you !
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  #6  
Old 08-09-2018, 04:33 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

I like what that guy has to say.
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  #7  
Old 08-09-2018, 05:38 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

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I like what that guy has to say.
I usually get annoyed with him but this time he's on the money.
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Old 08-09-2018, 07:27 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

I think there's a ton more sampling happening than all of us realize.

I guess my answer to this situation would be you'll just have to see what the final product sounds like. If it sounds better, then great. If not, get rid of the samples. Whatever serves the song best is what should happen.

I'm hoping that there is a way to A/B the songs (before and after sampling took place), so you can decide which way is better.

In addition, it looks like someone else has been in charge of production. After producing a boatload of albums by myself, I'm happy to turn that part of the process over personally.
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  #9  
Old 08-09-2018, 08:29 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

I insisted on no quantizing or anything like that. I would really like to just do the drums with EQing and whatnot but the guitar player was being very difficult about the situation so I finally relented to do Blending.
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  #10  
Old 08-09-2018, 08:43 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

Last time I went into the studio they tried to pull this garbage, he actually said "we do it basically every time"... My response basically was that is garbage and I want to hear my performance, not my performance "enhanced" with someone else's recorded sounds. I said there's only two reasons we should have to do that. 1) The recording engineer sucks or is lazy and cannot get a good capture or 2) My drums aren't tuned right and don't sound their best. Since I was more than happy to re-tune however he thought I should, only one "issue" could remain.

I stuck to my guns and nobody has ever said "geez, you should have done sound replacement". The opposite, in fact, I get raves about the drum sounds.

What we have to remember here, though, is that these guys in smaller studios like this see absolute garbage drummers and drums that are not tuned well most of the time. From their stand-point more often than not it's possible they really do need to do sound replacement and it's just habit. Sort of an unfortunate reality I guess.
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  #11  
Old 08-09-2018, 10:59 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

I just spoke with a guy that I know who was a drummer in a major band and he was telling me that pretty much everything in rock and metal drum wise now day's is sampled in studio. Kind of a shame really as it adds in more complications that really don't need to be. The drummer now has to worry about a sound engineer screwing up their playing by not correctly coping ghost notes and general Dynamics. But if that's the way that things are I guess I better get hip on how to make it work for the best.
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  #12  
Old 08-09-2018, 11:34 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

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Originally Posted by drummingman View Post
I just spoke with a guy that I know who was a drummer in a major band and he was telling me that pretty much everything in rock and metal drum wise now day's is sampled in studio. Kind of a shame really as it adds in more complications that really don't need to be. The drummer now has to worry about a sound engineer screwing up their playing by not correctly coping ghost notes and general Dynamics. But if that's the way that things are I guess I better get hip on how to make it work for the best.
This happened with me. First time in said studio there was no triggering at all. Drums sounded great until the mix was finalized. My toms got buried in the mix, and was told if they were triggered it could be fixed. Second time I opted for the triggers. They kept failing and/or registering false hits. After recording and about a week of mixing, we went back to said studio to hear the results. The engineer was really excited for us to hear one particular track. This was because he took it upon himself to chop up my triplet foot rolls. After lots of "discussion", he said he would put it back. It was never fixed correctly. So my drums sounded like electronic garbage on top of being messed with. Not a happy experience at all. I'll take buried over garbage any day.
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Old 08-10-2018, 01:27 AM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

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Originally Posted by MrInsanePolack View Post
This happened with me. First time in said studio there was no triggering at all. Drums sounded great until the mix was finalized. My toms got buried in the mix, and was told if they were triggered it could be fixed. Second time I opted for the triggers. They kept failing and/or registering false hits. After recording and about a week of mixing, we went back to said studio to hear the results. The engineer was really excited for us to hear one particular track. This was because he took it upon himself to chop up my triplet foot rolls. After lots of "discussion", he said he would put it back. It was never fixed correctly. So my drums sounded like electronic garbage on top of being messed with. Not a happy experience at all. I'll take buried over garbage any day.
Man that sucks. It's honestly this kind of thing that I'm afraid of. That's why I'm watching the situation so closely that I'm currently in.
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Old 08-10-2018, 05:53 AM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

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How common is sound blending and replacing in most situations currently? Am what I'm currently dealing with pretty normal in the modern music scene in most all styles nowadays? It almost seems that unless a drummer has a very large budget to go into a top of the line studio using top of the line mics in a killer room working with an experienced engineer that this is the way that most people are currently doing it to save money and time. If this is what most modern recording is coming too on the whole it seems that it would just be better to have a good E kit for recording and only take out the acoustic drum's for live show's. As much as I don't like that as a drummer, because of my love for real drum sounds on their own, I have to wonder if that is where things are currently?
How common? It's ubiquitous. Not only in metal, but in pop and country as well. Even when the drums have been lovingly recorded in a nice studio.

No, it's not better to have an e-kit, because blending the natural drums in with the samples is what keeps it from sounding absolutely terrible and fake.

Learn all you can about sample enhancement, and watch the process closely. They're your drum tracks, so you may as well ensure they sound decent.
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  #15  
Old 08-10-2018, 05:53 AM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

Im actually talking with the guitar player of the studio project and letting him know that I can live with the kick blending but not the snare and toms. I honestly don't even want to do it on the kick but I'm trying to meet him in the middle. By the way, this is just a 2 man project. He is also playing the bass parts. But we wrote the songs together.

If he is not cool with this I'm honestly just thinking about getting my drum tracks from him, they are on his computer, and finding someone else to write with to the drum tracks that I have already cut.
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Old 08-10-2018, 08:21 AM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

Just as in everything else out there, there's vast differences in sample library quality, especially where velocities & room are concerned. Equally, how the samples are blended, particularly matching velocities with the original acoustic capture, is key to a great result.

As we all know, a great drum sound starts with a great sounding kit & room. Those two elements are what's often missing, frequently beyond the means of many, & absolutely not on the radar of bedroom studio creators.

I've heard blending done really well, but often heard terrible results. I recently contributed to a superb library that was recorded absolutely with the aim of replicating real performances in mind. It takes huge attention to detail to pull that off, & all the source elements / context you'd expect in any top drawer drum capture / production session.
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Old 08-10-2018, 07:59 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

I've had it done to my drum recordings. In rock music it seems pretty common now.
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Old 08-10-2018, 08:03 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

It's complete nonsense and another example of how digital perfection gets coveted at the expense of life in the recordings. It's a way for bad engineers to come up with "drum tracks" that sound closer to the overproduced garbage they get compared to.

It's just as pervasive, and just as bad as all the quantizing and outright hit replacement that's also nearly default.

It really can, and really does hurt the artistic and "real" quality a recording might have had. I would say that drummers need to start asking what is wrong with their drums and the studio's ability to record them before chasing the perfection dragon by layering in someone else' performance of individual hits.

Just because we might covet and think an immaculate model with perfect makeup and a full makeover is a pleasing sight doesn't mean we can no longer respect and find real beauty in an un-enhanced person in their natural state. It's to the point now where we take this same made up model and use the computer to make them even more "perfect" way into unrealistic standards. Now we're doing the same thing with music and it's mostly just because we can with computers.

Ask for reasons and make sure they make sense if you don't prefer layered samples don't be quiet about it. It's your music and your recording.
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Old 08-10-2018, 11:26 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

Sadly this almost seems like a lost cause. There seems to be a constant fight to get natural drum sounds while everyone else in a band, including the recording engineer, is pushing to do samples. I know that someone in this thread said that it's ubiquitous now day's. From all I've been seeing through research that seems to be true. In my opinion it's a sad state of affairs.

That said, whenever I have the choice I will choose natural drum's. I think that so many people don't even know what real drums sound like on an album anymore. That's why when they hear real drums it sounds wrong to them.
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Old 08-11-2018, 12:53 AM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

It's generally more cost effective to get punchy, tight, clean, modern sounds with samples. If your source recording wasn't done well, or if your engineer just isn't hip to how to EQ, compress, gate, and side chain everything appropriately, then you aren't getting those sounds. Or, if the client isn't willing to pay for the time it takes to get there, samples might be the path of least resistance.

Most if the metal I'm listening to is still being done with real drums and microphones, but I'm not so much into a lot of the deathcore or super techy stuff. Bands like High on Fire, Between the Buried and Me, and Intronaut are still getting excellent analog sounds, not to mention anything Kurt Ballou engineers. That being said, I'm not opposed to samples or sound replacement, some of the super fast tech stuff would sound worse without it.

Personally, I've only ever done sound replacing once, with middling results, but that could be said for that entire recording. I'm still game to do it again if the situation calls for it. Most of my composing and demo work is already done digitally anyway. I've also invested in my own microphones and know enough about placement such that I can be assured a consistent and usable source recording in just about any room. If an engineer has better mics or different preferences, so be it, but I always have the fact that I can go back and track on my own in my back pocket, whoever ends up at the mixing desk
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Old 08-11-2018, 05:31 AM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

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Originally Posted by drummingman View Post
..Just to say, he is used to hearing modern metal albums where pretty much all the drums are triggered..

I am completely not getting those 'modern' metal people regarding their sound..Everything sounds colder than cold and basically completely dead..

Tell the guy to listen Hell Awaits again and if he still thinks his triggered drums sound better he should look another job..
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Old 08-11-2018, 06:25 AM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

Btw, just as an addition to my post above, i am definitely not a metal-expert and maybe some sorts of metal are actually supposed to sound completely cold and dead..

In that case, i would say, things are just not my taste..
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Old 08-11-2018, 07:16 AM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

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some sorts of metal are actually supposed to sound completely cold and dead..
Ding ding ding. Sometimes it's an aesthetic choice. Sometimes the songs are so overblown and dense that's the way to get any kind of presence.

Then on the flipside, you have bands that are basically doing recordings on 4 track.

Over the years, I've heard probably most any conceivable recording technique employed towards the genre of metal as a whole, and any of it can work. I think it really depends on the particular act; having a particular vision and knowing (or stumbling on) how to achieve it. Plenty of classic genre albums have objectively terrible production (here's looking at you, 90's Florida death metal and Norwegian black metal) and are more revered today than ever before. The poor production is part of the charm and vibe.

If you're trying to emulate a certain sound, you're probably already late to the party anyway. Which, if you're trying to ride the wave of the cool sound of the year isn't bad, I suppose. It's also safer to emulate an established sound rather than just sticking to your arbitrary guns and putting things in a blender and finding out what happens.

Ultimately, as a listener, I'm pretty neutral on the whole concept of blending or sound replacing. My tastes tend to skew towards natural, but there are still plenty of things I listen to that augment, replace, or even just outright use completely lifeless programmed drums.
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Old 08-11-2018, 08:12 AM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

Once you stick a mic on a drum it's no longer the natural sound of a drumset. How far back in time do you want to go? It wasn't too long ago that a mic on the kick was asking too much.
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:58 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

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This happened with me. First time in said studio there was no triggering at all. Drums sounded great until the mix was finalized. My toms got buried in the mix, and was told if they were triggered it could be fixed. Second time I opted for the triggers. They kept failing and/or registering false hits. After recording and about a week of mixing, we went back to said studio to hear the results. The engineer was really excited for us to hear one particular track. This was because he took it upon himself to chop up my triplet foot rolls. After lots of "discussion", he said he would put it back. It was never fixed correctly. So my drums sounded like electronic garbage on top of being messed with. Not a happy experience at all. I'll take buried over garbage any day.

It is not complicated to trigger drums. with programs like slate2 to you slap it on a track, select the sample you want, and boom. They even have velocity in there so it DOES play good ghost notes. This is why he probibly do it. cost savings of not having to mix for hours, and it gives it that perfect polished radio sound with almost no effort.

Editing or chopping up tracks takes experience and can make things sound way worse and unnatural. Someone good at editing can make things sound better, but once you trigger and move everything to the grid, you might as well just program the drums to save cash.

I recorded at a studio a while back and had a different engineer mix the album. the natural drum tones were fantastic. Punchy, consistent, clean, and that was with no eq, compression or anything. well, the guy then slapped triggers on them and turned the overheads way down.. because the mic bleed from the overheads probibly conflicted with his samples a bit. I could barely hear the cymbals.


"some sorts of metal are actually supposed to sound completely cold and dead.."

Most MODERN metal is like this yes. But that is just the style, love it or hate it, it is what it is. Everything changes every few years, maybe the open atmospheric style will come back, lofi recordings. who knows.


On a forum full of drummers of course we want our "own sound" and playing on the album. Find a panel of 100 listeners and non musicians. Slap on some amp sims, triggered and edited drums and studio magic and ask THEM what they prefer haha. It's not always about us rather than getting the popular sounds in that timeframe. If you want a natural sound try recording your next metal album with 2 overheads and just a tiny bit of compression and eq and see how it turns out. Actually it would probibly sound awesome, but not cellphone/car stereo friendly with huge loud punchy drums.



My last comment is good for a laugh when I see guys using expensive preamps, crazy mics and have the drummers put on all new heads before the studio and still replace everything. If I go into one of those "known" studios in the future I am going to find some garbage drumheads and put them on before I go in and end up with the same sound as every other band coming out of it.
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Old 08-11-2018, 06:30 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

I guess I'm just glad I don't play metal. Apparently not having your own drum sounds is the actual norm there. It's like I'm in a weird alter-world and some of the back-flips people do to justify layering in someone else's playing over theirs are mystifying to me.

The way a drummer hits a drum matters to me. It's all part of the sound and ideas I'm trying to convey. I'm sure that's not the case for every drummer or every style of music, but it makes me a little sad to read some of this.

If you want that sound, or think that's what sounds best, then fine. I'm not into the way drummers get bullied into something they aren't comfortable with or don't think sounds best. This is the kind of thing that makes an entire genre or generation start to sound the same to my ear.
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Old 08-11-2018, 08:00 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

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Originally Posted by Dr_Watso View Post
I guess I'm just glad I don't play metal. Apparently not having your own drum sounds is the actual norm there. It's like I'm in a weird alter-world and some of the back-flips people do to justify layering in someone else's playing over theirs are mystifying to me.

The way a drummer hits a drum matters to me. It's all part of the sound and ideas I'm trying to convey. I'm sure that's not the case for every drummer or every style of music, but it makes me a little sad to read some of this.

If you want that sound, or think that's what sounds best, then fine. I'm not into the way drummers get bullied into something they aren't comfortable with or don't think sounds best. This is the kind of thing that makes an entire genre or generation start to sound the same to my ear.

I agree a ton with this. all music is starting to sound the same but it has nothing to do with just being a "metal" thing

country, rock, pop... You name it they use triggers in the studio, and many live.

I feel every song on the radio these days have the same drum sounds and production too. Sure there are exceptions. Same with metal.


I'll trigger my kick because 16th notes at 240 sound like crap without it.. I like the distinct short consistent sound. Plus volume is a bit of a challenge above those speeds..... My snare and toms I want to sound like me though. I always say that a live performance is the bast way to judge a band. I have seen bands who I have been very excited for from their albums totally disappoint. Studio magic doesn't help you learn to keep time, tune your drums, or play tight with the band when you are on stage.

Last edited by beyondbetrayal; 08-11-2018 at 09:56 PM.
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Old 08-11-2018, 08:24 PM
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

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I'll trigger my kick because 16th notes at 240 sound like crap without it.. I like the distinct short consistent sound. Plus volume is a bit of a challenge above those speeds..... My snare and toms I want to sound like me though. I always say that a live performance is the bast way to judge a band. I have seen bands who I have been very excited for from their albums totally disappoint. Studio magic doesn't help you learn to keep time, tune your drums, or play tight with the band when you are on stage.
I 100% think you should do whatever you need to do to get that sound in your head. It's only when it gets pushed on someone I'm not comfortable with it. I know of several threads on this forum opened similar to this one where someone had triggers slapped down against their wishes.

And it's all out the window if someone else is paying you to play of course, in that case you give em what they want.

Edit, also, you're right it's not restricted to metal, but that's one of the genres where I've seen the attitude prevalent.
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Old 08-11-2018, 10:00 PM
beyondbetrayal beyondbetrayal is offline
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

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Originally Posted by Dr_Watso View Post
I 100% think you should do whatever you need to do to get that sound in your head. It's only when it gets pushed on someone I'm not comfortable with it. I know of several threads on this forum opened similar to this one where someone had triggers slapped down against their wishes.

And it's all out the window if someone else is paying you to play of course, in that case you give em what they want.

Edit, also, you're right it's not restricted to metal, but that's one of the genres where I've seen the attitude prevalent.
haha, you're not wrong as it's really bad in metal. The difference is, that the samples chosen are super clean, produced, steven slate type samples with next to no dynamics making it this way to sound more "heavy" or "crushing" The drums are super up front in metal too.

I honestly think given the amount of rock bands etc on the radio its probibly much more common. they just use more tasteful samples, more dynamics, and have the drums not so far forward in the mix.

I did a test once where I made a video on my acoustic kit, I used some pretty reasonable samples with full dynamics.. I had people asking what heads I was using and my tuning settings because they thought they were great sounding drums when in reality they were 2 year old heads tuned to crap.

cymbals used to be the giveaway, but now a days those cymbal samples sound fantastic and with the midi packs its REALLY hard for even a trained ear to tell......... I just assume everything is fake until I see someone play or am told otherwise at this point hahaa
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  #30  
Old 08-13-2018, 02:31 PM
brentcn brentcn is offline
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

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Originally Posted by drummingman View Post
Sadly this almost seems like a lost cause. There seems to be a constant fight to get natural drum sounds while everyone else in a band, including the recording engineer, is pushing to do samples. I know that someone in this thread said that it's ubiquitous now day's. From all I've been seeing through research that seems to be true. In my opinion it's a sad state of affairs.

That said, whenever I have the choice I will choose natural drum's. I think that so many people don't even know what real drums sound like on an album anymore. That's why when they hear real drums it sounds wrong to them.
it helps to understand a bit why samples get used. I've worked a lot as a mixing engineer, and mixed singles, albums, commercial spots, demos, live recordings, etc., and have experience with metal, hardcore, and other aggressive genres.

While samples change the tone of the drums, what they really do is help the drums cut through the "wall" of high-gain, very distorted guitars, which are very bright and compressed, before any mixing. So it's really not about the drums themselves, but about how they survive in the context of the other instruments. If you back off the guitars and bass, in order to let the drums come through the mix, the overall result is less "muscular", and, just as importantly, the cymbals will be too loud in relation to the snare. It's really difficult to get a bright, detailed snare sound, and keep the hi-hat and cymbals down at the same time, because, when you EQ and compress the high end of the snare track, the high end of the cymbals also gets processed, and sticks out more. If you gate the snare track severely, in order to reduce this bleed, the overall results sounds very unnatural.

By contrast, enhancing the kick is really about improving the consistency and articulation of the performance. As speeds increase, it's physically necessary to play the kick a bit more softly, but with samples, it can sound like the kick is being slammed with full-leg force with every hit, at even the highest speeds. Of course, if the kicks were not lovingly mic'd inside and out in the first place, the samples will of improve the tone.

As previously stated, the bleed from the snare is problematic. There are ways to isolate the snare from the cymbals when recording: build a small baffle between the hi-hat and snare, use an additional mic on the snare top, move the hi-hat away from the snare, etc. But even on sessions where this happens, samples get used, because it's just easier and quicker to get a mix happening.
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  #31  
Old 08-13-2018, 07:05 PM
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Dr_Watso Dr_Watso is offline
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

Not able to get your recording exactly how you want? Not a fan of actual work and study to understand sound and recording? Too lazy to mix unless you have full separation of every sound? Weird obsession with making your album sound like every other album? Unable to hit the drum hard enough to make record-able noise?

Boy have I got the thing for you!

To avoid spending time getting good drum recordings, we use someone else's recordings! It's genius! Work and good technique is for chumps!
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  #32  
Old 08-13-2018, 07:40 PM
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Dr_Watso Dr_Watso is offline
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

Singer not quite able to hit the right notes? Singer deciding that the key the song is in doesn't quite match how they want to sing? Got a lazy engineer who is tired of vocal takes? Sound like way too much work to actually learn how to sing before you go into the studio?

Boy have I got the thing for you!

Don't be like those dorks who learn how to sing and record vocals, just use software to alter the pitch! Everyone is doing it so it's totally okay and not at all a reflection of your inability to do things organically.
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Old 08-13-2018, 07:50 PM
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Dr_Watso Dr_Watso is offline
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Default Re: Sound blending or replacement

Playing and recording music getting you down? Finding that it's way too much work to play your instruments correctly or just don't have any talent at playing music? Don't like how your "bass drops" aren't up to snuff using an actual bass instrument?

Boy have I got the thing for you!

You don't even have to make music at all anymore! Simply click your mouse a few times. Use the "insert bass drop" wizard and let your phat beets play you into literal stardom without any of that work or effort those chump musicians go through!

That's right, folks... All of our efforts are silly and we should give up quickly and use shortcuts as a matter of course. That way we aren't bothering people to learn anything or do things right with effort.
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