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Old 11-30-2012, 04:44 AM
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Jeremy Bender Jeremy Bender is offline
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Default Recording drums at home info

I found information on recording drums at a home studio from this website http://www.basic-home-recording-stud...-setup-11.html

There is a block diagram showing the components needed to record drums the new way (on a computer) instead of a tape deck. I hope someone may find this helpful.
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Old 11-30-2012, 04:57 AM
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Default Re: Recording drums at home info

Here is how I do it.
http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...ad.php?t=92804
I simply use my portable PA as a mixer and I use a USB interface to get the drums into my laptop. GarageBand does the rest.
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Old 11-30-2012, 05:00 AM
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Default Re: Recording drums at home info

Can't disagree with that as a basic flow diagram.

I would eliminate the two extra dynamics on the right and left for basic recording but this is just an indication of what is necessary.

Thanks for finding that. When I'm composing I always draw my own flow diagrams and I should have thought to do a basic drum recording diagram a long time ago for this forum.

The website looks quite good. I'll have a read and see if I find anything glaringly incorrect or glaringly useful. I'm suspecting the latter.

EDIT: On first impression, although it's not comprehensive and the 'gear' sections are a little limited in their specific hardware recommendations, the principles are sound. This is a decent site and has just the right amount of information for people just starting on the journey.

Can I make a request that this thread be put up as a Sticky?
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Old 11-30-2012, 01:05 PM
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Default Re: Recording drums at home info

Looks like chrome rack but not a straight piece on it- hanging cymbals, modern hi hat stand, gong drums x2, concert toms with wood hoops, T handle tension rods, inlays around the bottom
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Old 12-01-2012, 05:30 AM
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Default Re: Recording drums at home info

Quote:
Originally Posted by broken View Post
Looks like chrome rack but not a straight piece on it- hanging cymbals, modern hi hat stand, gong drums x2, concert toms with wood hoops, T handle tension rods, inlays around the bottom
I think you're seeing more than meets the eye!
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Old 12-01-2012, 07:02 AM
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Default Re: Recording drums at home info

For home recording, you have to first decide what you want to do. Just hear what you're playing sound like? Or record fully produced songs? YouTube videos? Pro sounding YouTube videos? And so on.

If you're after quality sound, the number of mic (and input channels you need) is inversely proportional to the quality of your recording space. Two or three mics in a great space can make for a killer recording. e.g. old Zep records. A space with lots of reflections and standing waves tends to work better close mic'd. Which means a lot of mics all over the place. The other problem is that the better you want it to sound, the more expensive the mics are going to be.

So, it becomes apparent that the biggest bang for your buck is in setting up a good recording space. Not necessarily a room covered in carpet or egg cartons, but a good balanced sound without any dead spaces or areas that are boomy. Then you only need to buy a handful of good microphones, which are the next most important thing after the space. Then you work your way down the signal chain. Whatever your budget can afford for preamps which are less important than the mics, but more important than the interface.

At the point where you have some really good mics, then it starts to get worth it to get good pres and eventually higher end interfaces to improve the sound. But you can get very good recordings with entry level condensers like MXL or CAD, Good dynamic mics like Shure, Sennheiser or Audix, M-Audio pre/interfaces and so on. In fact, unless you put together a really nice room with a really well tuned up kit, it's hard to justify higher end stuff.
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