DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussion forum for all drum related topics. Use this forum to exchange ideas and information with your fellow drummers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 03-26-2015, 01:19 AM
rogue_drummer's Avatar
rogue_drummer rogue_drummer is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 1,366
Default Sloppy fills

Not to sound too critical, but has anyone ever been less than impressed with a local drummer you've seen in your city playing live with his/her band?

I'm referring to the local cats who play in local bands and are billed by others' word-of-mouth as being so good, only see and hear them play live it leaves you with an empty feeling.

Ever since 2009 I've heard of this local drummer named Ed (not his real name) as being so good and who "plays with everyone" and "you've got to hear this guy, he's great". So I get an invite from a guitar player friend of mine that will be in town and playing at Club "XYZ", and this drummer Ed guy will be playing drums. So the wife is out of town for the weekend and I decide to go and listen to the band and have a few cold ones.

Let me say, from the start the band sounds great. Great sound, great mix, great songs. The drummer is good - so long as he stays in the pocket - and doesn't venture any but the most basic of snare fills. To say his drum set snare and tom fills were sloppy is an understatement. The rest of the band was fantastic.

First few songs he did this to I thought he just needed to get warmed up. Nerves or something. No biggie. We all need that from time to time.

As the night wore on, I realized that is how he plays. Sloppy fills. Granted his pocket is great and solid. Great hat, ride and snare grooves, but man, those fills would make a beginner cringe.

Anyway, I may be overly critical, but I just thought it a bit odd. So I drove home that night thinking "I'm doing okay with my playing." No worries. Ha!
__________________
I don't aim to be the best, just the best looking.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-26-2015, 01:48 AM
johnwesley's Avatar
johnwesley johnwesley is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Scottsdale Arizona
Posts: 700
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Maybe he's like Moon. Lots of people (drummers included) called his drumming sloppy. Probably no other terminology invented yet. However if you listen to what he did, it makes perfect sense. It's just not the "norm". Moon once said "I'm the best Keith Moon style drummer in the world." Maybe "Ed" is the best "Ed" style drummer in the world. Then again, maybe he's just sloppy.....
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-26-2015, 02:12 AM
Hollywood Jim's Avatar
Hollywood Jim Hollywood Jim is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 3,923
Default Re: Sloppy fills

I have seen this many times.

The drummer has a good 2&4 backbeat, but as soon as they try to play 8th, 16th or 32nd notes the rhythm of the fill goes out the window.

By the way, Keith Moon was a little sloppy, but the rhythm of his fills were great.


.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-26-2015, 05:53 AM
DrumEatDrum's Avatar
DrumEatDrum DrumEatDrum is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 9,448
Default Re: Sloppy fills

There is one song I did, floating around on the internet, where the fills were deliberately sloppy, because that's what best fit the music.

But that's not what you're talking about.

Way back when, I was playing in this bar band 3 times a week, just for the money. The band leader/bass player would have a flask in his pocket, and over the course of the night he'd get pretty ripped. And then he's get annoyed with me because my time wasn't wavering all over the place like his was. This other guy I knew asked to sit in, and ok, no prob. I knew this other guy's playing was pretty terrible. Well, the drunk band leader preferred the crappy player, because now both of their times were wavering all over the place in their alcohol induced slurring. So I got canned for keeping time too well, while they proceeded to have a slop fest the rest of the night. Which was fine, it wasn't like it was any great gig, and I taking steps to move on anyway.

But it goes to show perception of what is good or sloppy is up to interpretation, or at least based how many shots you've had. lol
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-26-2015, 08:36 AM
_Leviathan_ _Leviathan_ is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 177
Default Re: Sloppy fills

This is extremely common, from my experience. I think one of the biggest differences you can pick out from advanced drummers to beginner and intermediate drummers is the use of appropriate, well executed fills that don't disrupt the groove. Fills and grooves should compliment one another, and not disrupt the overall flow of the music.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-26-2015, 04:56 PM
MikeM's Avatar
MikeM MikeM is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 5,438
Default Re: Sloppy fills

In order to play fills that work, you have to practice them. I see a lot of drummers who can hold down the fort with adequate time, but since they see themselves as just time-keepers, their ability to pull off fills comes across as under-developed, which it is.

And therein lies the rub: play for the song, stay transparent and out of the way of the others, and as Buddy Rich once said, don't play a fill unless it will sound bad if you don't. But fills are required, to varying degrees, in virtually every style, so if they've been neglected, are not thoughtful or practiced, they'll come off as weak.

Gotta practice this stuff and not sit back all complacent-like with the lame excuse that "Hey, I'm just a simple pocket player that gets paid to be the only non-musician in the band." Doesn't mean you have to be a showboater, but you do need the ability to deliver the goods when it's called for. And if you are playing a mostly supportive role, it's especially important to nail that fill when it does happen cos that sucker's gonna stand out either way.
__________________
My kit: It's not just good, it's good enough.

My Band
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-26-2015, 05:30 PM
Patz Patz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 137
Default Re: Sloppy fills

I don't consider myself anything special as a drummer and I can be sloppy at times I guess, but as far as the local un-signed band scene goes, I generally feel better about how I stack up against the other guys after seeing some of them play. They might be great, but they aren't doing anything special. I think we watch so many killer players on youtube that it skews our expectations for the real world.

I started playing at 26 and I'm 35 now. I have two small kids, full time job and other hobbies. I practice when I can and try to pick up a new trick here and there, but after joining a band a year ago I realized that I'm going to enjoy the gigs a lot more if I don't try to get fancy and just hit the spots cleanly and in the pocket, making sure the song sounds great. The guy who plays drums for Axl & Roses said in an interview that if someone tells you after the show that you're a great drummer you over-played. That's gonna be a case by case basis, but I took it to heart.

And in all reality, almost no one in the audience will know if you're sloppy or not, so it's all good..lol
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-26-2015, 05:44 PM
SquadLeader's Avatar
SquadLeader SquadLeader is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Near Manchester, Great Britain
Posts: 1,306
Default Re: Sloppy fills

I listen to the music rather than the drumming. I'm just not a good enough drummer to go super critique on anyone else's drumming.

Plus, who knows what another drummers stories are...there may be reasons he's a little sloppy on occasions. Maybe he's tired after long shifts, maybe he's only been playing drums a few weeks. Who knows.

I'd hate the idea, when I came back to drumming after a decade hiatus and we nabbed a gig in the first few weeks after forming the band, when we were all as ropey as f**k, of some smart Alec in the audience thinking "ooo he's sloppy"
__________________
I lost my bag at Newport Pagnell.....
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-26-2015, 05:52 PM
Patz Patz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 137
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Quote:
Originally Posted by SquadLeader View Post
I listen to the music rather than the drumming. I'm just not a good enough drummer to go super critique on anyone else's drumming.

Plus, who knows what another drummers stories are...there may be reasons he's a little sloppy on occasions. Maybe he's tired after long shifts, maybe he's only been playing drums a few weeks. Who knows.

I'd hate the idea, when I came back to drumming after a decade hiatus and we nabbed a gig in the first few weeks after forming the band, when we were all as ropey as f**k, of some smart Alec in the audience thinking "ooo he's sloppy"
I presume every drummer is more skilled than I am, and they probably usually are. I love to see musicians support one another. The frontman for the band we're playing with this weekend has basically been solely responsible for getting us into that city's music scene. Very nice of him.

As far as other players go, anymore, I just listen to them to see if there's anything I can steal..lol
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-26-2015, 06:23 PM
petey petey is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 57
Default Re: Sloppy fills

I've seen this. Drummers that go to execute a fill and tank it, it sounds sloppy or just not great.

I've been to shows with pals or talked to friends about a particular local so-and-so who is a "terrific drummer" and I'll watch the dude or dudette and you can see that he/she is just not pulling it off 100%. They might have a good meter but sloppy on fast rolls and fills. Yet, my pals or others will call them a "fantastic drummer, so good". I'm of the opinion that some people listen with their Eyes. And a cool kit and a nice dressed drummer with the "look" with tons of energy will dazzle people -- even though they might be sloppy at times.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-26-2015, 08:12 PM
fess's Avatar
fess fess is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 142
Default Re: Sloppy fills

OMG, I think I'm Ed.
__________________
Fess

DW Performance Series
InDe' Kit
Paiste
Zildjian
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-26-2015, 10:15 PM
larryace's Avatar
larryace larryace is online now
"Uncle Larry"
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In beautiful Bucks County, PA
Posts: 21,258
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Being sloppy can be forgiven if the time doesn't lose or gain any rate of flow. Of course it's best not to be sloppy. If being sloppy sets the time on a new course, that's generally what we want to avoid right?
__________________
Levis/Hanes/Timberlands/Custom made socks
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-27-2015, 12:42 AM
DPTrainor DPTrainor is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 116
Default Re: Sloppy fills

I think everyone has a different level of skill - keeping time or fills. Comparing yourself with others tends to be a slippery slope that really serves no purpose. I enjoy listening to any drummer as I learn something whether they have been playing for 2 weeks or 20 years.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-27-2015, 12:58 AM
opentune's Avatar
opentune opentune is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 6,213
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Quote:
Originally Posted by DPTrainor View Post
I enjoy listening to any drummer as I learn something whether they have been playing for 2 weeks or 20 years.
Great statement. I think best to remain positive, and ya to learn from somebody who is not doing it right just as much as soembody who really is doing it well.

As for other bandmates, friends , general public saying how "great a drummer that Ed is", best to just smile to ourselves and know the truth.
__________________
Louis
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-27-2015, 07:44 AM
Anon La Ply's Avatar
Anon La Ply Anon La Ply is offline
Renegade
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cyberspace
Posts: 5,512
Default Re: Sloppy fills

I've fluffed more fills in my time that you can poke a stick at. Tons of them - maybe feeling a tad tight (or worse, you know another drummer is watching) and your limbs are set in position for the backbeat you've been dutifully providing for the last few minutes.

... Then it's time for the drums to do its bit but the limbs feel kinda funny and locked in and, before you know it, the fill's come and gone as a rushed, disruptive and sloppy thing.

It's one thing to practice getting around the kit, another to practice shifting smoothly into variations after playing long repeated passages.
__________________
Soundcloud
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-27-2015, 11:05 AM
SquadLeader's Avatar
SquadLeader SquadLeader is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Near Manchester, Great Britain
Posts: 1,306
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Quote:
Originally Posted by opentune View Post
Great statement. I think best to remain positive, and ya to learn from somebody who is not doing it right just as much as soembody who really is doing it well.

As for other bandmates, friends , general public saying how "great a drummer that Ed is", best to just smile to ourselves and know the truth.
I think something also being forgotten is that good drummers can also have slightly off nights.

Discussing a UK Subs gig post performance Jamie Oliver was explaining how he was a bit miffed that he'd made a few mistakes and his triplets had been a bit 'off'. And he really is a top draw punk rock drummer.
__________________
I lost my bag at Newport Pagnell.....
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-27-2015, 11:43 AM
Duck Tape's Avatar
Duck Tape Duck Tape is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Sydney
Posts: 4,484
Default Re: Sloppy fills

I know that transitioning from a groove to a fill is challenging for me.

I guess the only thing I'm left wondering is if Ed is indeed brilliant but OP just doesn't get what he's doing. I'm thinking syncopation, or odd note placement or a deliberately off sounding feel ala the j-Dilla thing. Just a possibility.

I remember tracking for a pop band I was in and the sound engineer just didn't get my reverse entry, behind the beat, flammy syncopated tom roll, and said I should play a "normal" fill.
__________________
Watch a purdie shuffle here!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFPmH1wrSiQ
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-27-2015, 11:49 AM
mikel mikel is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Midlands. England.
Posts: 2,266
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Quote:
Originally Posted by SquadLeader View Post
I listen to the music rather than the drumming. I'm just not a good enough drummer to go super critique on anyone else's drumming.

Plus, who knows what another drummers stories are...there may be reasons he's a little sloppy on occasions. Maybe he's tired after long shifts, maybe he's only been playing drums a few weeks. Who knows.

I'd hate the idea, when I came back to drumming after a decade hiatus and we nabbed a gig in the first few weeks after forming the band, when we were all as ropey as f**k, of some smart Alec in the audience thinking "ooo he's sloppy"
Plus 1 on that. I have never gone to a gig to see a specific musician, I go to watch a performance. A band stands or falls as a whole.

I am not sloppy, I merely add colour, swing and feel to the music.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03-27-2015, 11:57 AM
mikel mikel is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Midlands. England.
Posts: 2,266
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnwesley View Post
Maybe he's like Moon. Lots of people (drummers included) called his drumming sloppy. Probably no other terminology invented yet. However if you listen to what he did, it makes perfect sense. It's just not the "norm". Moon once said "I'm the best Keith Moon style drummer in the world." Maybe "Ed" is the best "Ed" style drummer in the world. Then again, maybe he's just sloppy.....
Nail on head. Someone else said that all fills need to be practiced, and for most of us that is true, but quite often Moon was reaching for something he had never done before and had just popped into his head. Now sometimes it came off and sometimes not, but how brave and creative is that? I for one would much rather see a gig that was a moment in time and probably never repeated the same again, like the lucky few in Leeds that night.

Making something up on the spot rather than just putting together phrases and fills you have practiced over and over so there is very little room for error, now thats an artist.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 03-27-2015, 04:25 PM
bsmntdrummer bsmntdrummer is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 20
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Certainly it is better to be clean than sloppy, and we'd all like to be the kind of drummer that earns the admiration of other drummers with our super cool, perfectly executed fills. And, we can't rule out that he just had a bad night. But there might be another lesson here.

You've been hearing about this guy for years, and he plays with everyone in town. His groove is solid, but his fills are simple or sloppy. Does that say something about how important our super cool, perfectly executed fills are to other musicians?
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 03-27-2015, 04:29 PM
MikeM's Avatar
MikeM MikeM is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 5,438
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikel View Post
Nail on head. Someone else said that all fills need to be practiced, and for most of us that is true, but quite often Moon was reaching for something he had never done before and had just popped into his head. Now sometimes it came off and sometimes not, but how brave and creative is that? I for one would much rather see a gig that was a moment in time and probably never repeated the same again, like the lucky few in Leeds that night.

Making something up on the spot rather than just putting together phrases and fills you have practiced over and over so there is very little room for error, now thats an artist.
I absolutely agree with this. Thing is that Moon was practicing fills, and practically all the time. Obviously he wasn't deliberately mapping them out, more that he was putting into practice the bits he already knew how to play in different combinations and doing it on the fly. The result ended up being the same thing, and since that was how he rolled in general, he ended up spectacularly good at it.

What I've done to practice fills is just put on headphones while flipping through radio stations, CDs, mp3s, or whatever. Then basically playing fills all over the place - every 4 bars or more. Of course, you would never do that on a gig, or even at band practice, but the idea is to just go for it in a Moon-esque kind of way almost as if the music were just a sound track to your practice session. I don't even see it as practice, necessarily; it's just stupid fun, but then when I'm playing with the band and the time comes for a fill, I'm not as likely to be pulled from my comfort zone by attempting a fill since fills have become part of that comfort zone.

One other point about fills that was in another thread a couple weeks ago - my opinion is that fills should never get so disjointed that they break the flow. I don't remember whose interview it was I was reading in Modern Drummer sometime back in the '80s, but he said he never thought of fills as being separate from the groove, but rather as an extension of it. I think that's a powerful way to look at it, and lends insight into how solos happen, especially in jazz. So if you take the idea of practicing fills every 4 bars while playing along to the radio, and after mixing them up, extending/shifting their duration and running them over the bar line, now instead of playing a string of fills, you're suddenly in solo territory where the fill never stops.

And wouldn't you know it, when Moonie's on a tear, that's what ends up happening. Good times! Dave Weckl is really good at that, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anon La Ply View Post
It's one thing to practice getting around the kit, another to practice shifting smoothly into variations after playing long repeated passages.
Yet another deep insight, Grea! As much as I've gone off the rails in my own little practice sessions, thinking I can transition smoothly from playing straight to launching into something, there IS something particularly vexing about what you describe and I don't have that figured out. I know Larry's acutely aware of this too, since he's always quick to point out that there's nothing wrong with holding a groove forever without putting any fills in, and he's right. If I'm playing a long passage of straight skeletal time, I tend to shy away from fills as any transition to a fill becomes very delicate and a risk usually not worth taking. Don't know what it is about the brain that makes that so tough, but it is - unless you can channel Jeff Porcaro.
__________________
My kit: It's not just good, it's good enough.

My Band

Last edited by MikeM; 03-27-2015 at 04:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 03-27-2015, 04:43 PM
opentune's Avatar
opentune opentune is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 6,213
Default Re: Sloppy fills

While we're on topic, does anybody here do a fill for more than one bar? More than two bars?
__________________
Louis
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 03-27-2015, 07:15 PM
rogue_drummer's Avatar
rogue_drummer rogue_drummer is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 1,366
Default Re: Sloppy fills

While we're on topic, does anybody here do a fill for more than one bar? More than two bars?

Sometimes whenever a guitar player or keys player has a long solo, or the song is transitioning from one part to another (verse to chorus, to the bridge, outro, etc.) if a fill fits that part of the song, I may fill several bars as a lead in to set them up for their solo, or lead in to the transition. Never more than two or three bars tops.

One of the songs the band I was just in that fizzled played Creedance Cleerwater Revival's "Who'll Stop the Rain". Not much heavy lifting there but I was playing the fills exaclty like Doug Clifford did on the recording. After playing it a few times I got mixed reactions from the rest of the guys. I was playing "too many fills."

Jokingly I explained I was playing like it was on the recording. So to clown around these guys pulled it up on their I-phone and ran it thru the PA system and listened to it. "Oh..." was their repsonse. I asked if I needed to keep as is or leave a few out. All 3 guys told me to keep playing it as I was; "...sounds good that way!" LOL
__________________
I don't aim to be the best, just the best looking.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-27-2015, 07:22 PM
alparrott's Avatar
alparrott alparrott is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wenatchee, WA
Posts: 6,627
Default Re: Sloppy fills

I've been the sloppy fill guy before, and where I was most guilty is 16th notes on the snare. I would kind of slur my way through it without paying attention to precision very much. And eventually I heard what that sounds like on a recording. So I started practicing to a metronome and working on nailing each and every note in the fill.

In the end, it's just a bit of discipline that maybe some folks don't realize they need until, like me, they figure it out.
__________________
Al Parrott
"Jus suum cuique"
-------------------------------------------------------
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-27-2015, 07:40 PM
IDDrummer's Avatar
IDDrummer IDDrummer is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Mid-Atlantic
Posts: 5,201
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Quote:
Originally Posted by alparrott View Post
And eventually I heard what that sounds like on a recording. So I started practicing to a metronome and working on nailing each and every note in the fill.
This is what it takes to wake a lot of people up, I think. Myself, certainly. There is nothing like hearing yourself and thinking, "I sound like THAT?" to make you tighten things up.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 03-27-2015, 10:49 PM
eddypierce eddypierce is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 305
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Quote:
Originally Posted by opentune View Post
While we're on topic, does anybody here do a fill for more than one bar? More than two bars?
Yes, sometimes. Speaking of which, I've always loved the 4+ bar fill that Al Jackson does on this, starting around 2:03: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oy4U9tR3Zw

Couldn't be simpler, but how effective and exciting.

Ed
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 03-27-2015, 11:44 PM
opentune's Avatar
opentune opentune is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 6,213
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Quote:
Originally Posted by rogue_drummer View Post
[

One of the songs the band I was just in that fizzled played Creedance Cleerwater Revival's "Who'll Stop the Rain". Not much heavy lifting there but I was playing the fills exaclty like Doug Clifford did on the recording. After playing it a few times I got mixed reactions from the rest of the guys. I was playing "too many fills."
ha. yes there are many fills in there, but to my ear/count only one bar for each fill (4 beats )
__________________
Louis
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 03-27-2015, 11:45 PM
DPTrainor DPTrainor is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 116
Default Re: Sloppy fills

Quote:
Originally Posted by eddypierce View Post
Yes, sometimes. Speaking of which, I've always loved the 4+ bar fill that Al Jackson does on this, starting around 2:03: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oy4U9tR3Zw

Couldn't be simpler, but how effective and exciting.

Ed
Couldn't be simpler, but how wonderfully that fill fit musically! It's all about the music!
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 03-29-2015, 05:16 AM
drumbler drumbler is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 56
Default Re: Sloppy fills

From Entwhistle: "Well, Keith didn’t particularly keep time too well. If he was feeling down the songs would be slow, if he was feeling up the songs would be too fast, and if he felt normal the songs would be normal. I would get very frustrated because he couldn’t actually play hi-hat at all, just a mess of cymbals" From:
http://www.drummagazine.com/features...keith-moon/P1/
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 03-29-2015, 06:45 AM
rogue_drummer's Avatar
rogue_drummer rogue_drummer is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 1,366
Default Re: Sloppy fills

ha. yes there are many fills in there, but to my ear/count only one bar for each fill (4 beats )

Precisely! I was using that as an example of not the length of the fill but the number of fills in the song. Doug Clifford does it so smoothly you don't realize they are all there until you start analyzing the song. Then you feel like an idiot for listening to the song for 30 some years and didn't realize all those fills are in there. Lol
__________________
I don't aim to be the best, just the best looking.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:11 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com