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  #1  
Old 08-24-2010, 04:05 PM
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Default Good drumming to the audience

I know what most drummers consider good drumming (I know there are a wide variety of opinions about groove and chops) but what does the audience (non-musicians) consider good drumming?

I once had a lady tell me when I was first starting out that you're not a good drummer until you can play wipeout...which I could, a few months later. Do you think most of us are overrated or underrated by the audience?
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Old 08-24-2010, 04:21 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

Rock and pop audiences pick up a lot without knowing what it is that they're picking up, just that a band sounds fantastic, cool, good, okay, boring or bleagh. If the grooves are strong and clean and there's bit of flair in the right places, people will like the drummer.

As often as not, drummers are barely noticed unless they are flashy or sexy, but a good, confident drummer's influence gives a band a strong platform that gets audiences going.

The extramusical matters a lot more to non-musos. Smugness, pretentiousness, massive egos, being uninterested or over-serious etc can be a major turnoff, even when the playing is strong. Musos are more likely to forgive those social faux pas if they like the music IMO
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Old 08-24-2010, 04:25 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

Most audiences I've played for only notice the 'overall' sound and if that sounds good then by definition I'm good. If my kit sounds terrible but I'm playing well, I suspect that people would say 'the drummer is no good' along the same lines if a guitar is out of tune but the guitarist is wailing away like a pro, it's not going to sound good to 'Dave'

I'm not sure too many non-drummers would know the difference between a paradiddle and a hole in the wall. And I say that with all due respect.
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Old 08-24-2010, 04:28 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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Originally Posted by Pkaneps View Post
Do you think most of us are overrated or underrated by the audience?
Harry Conway once said something in a thread, not unlike this one and I've been hangin' to "steal it" ever since.

It went something like........"95% of the audience may or may not have been aware that there were some drums on stage"..........brilliant!! (thanks H)

Never put much thought into what benchmarks a punter would use to rate my playing. Personally, as long as they dig the music, have a good time, leave happy and hopefully want to come back, then I consider whatever it is that I'm doing must be working.
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Old 08-24-2010, 04:28 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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Originally Posted by Pkaneps View Post
what does the audience (non-musicians) consider good drumming?
Same answer you gave to the first part:
Quote:
there are a wide variety of opinions
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Old 08-24-2010, 04:58 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

Honestly, I have found that playing in a classic rock band, if we play a couple of tunes where the drums open with a strong 4/4 beat with maybe a double kick on 3, and you put in a few round the kit fills, most ordinary punters will think you are a good drummer.
I am fully aware of my own limitations and know that any other half decent drummer would also be able to spot them but I comfort myself with the knowledge that there are not so many drummers at my gigs!!
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Old 08-24-2010, 05:11 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

in my experience, i get the most compliments if i really go nuts on stage. i know it's not good to overplay, so i try to avoid that, but i've learned that some crazy fills or other tricky stuff at appropriate moments tends to get people excited.
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Old 08-24-2010, 05:51 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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in my experience, i get the most compliments if i really go nuts on stage. i know it's not good to overplay, so i try to avoid that, but i've learned that some crazy fills or other tricky stuff at appropriate moments tends to get people excited.
I think this is largely true, I think Joe Public like the drums to be out there in your face and will notice a drummer thats overplaying and loudish and think it's good whilst another drummer listening to the same thing may well be cringing.
Take the op's mention of wipeout as an example, if you break it down it's not actually hard to play and yet the average audience like it and think it's highly skilled but if you dropped in an F - Off Vinnie or Gavin Harrison chop with the accompanied subtlety they play it with that most of us on here would simply be drooling over and I think you'll find it'll go straight over Joe Publics head !!
Again it's not a critism of your average audience but simply they don't know what they're looking for same as someone going over a jump on a horse I wouldn't have a clue if they're a relative newbie at the local stables or national champion but I'd be impressed anyway as I sure as hell can't do it !!!
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Old 08-24-2010, 06:34 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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I think this is largely true, I think Joe Public like the drums to be out there in your face and will notice a drummer thats overplaying and loudish and think it's good whilst another drummer listening to the same thing may well be cringing.
that's absolutely true! my sister, who is professional guitarist, says if you want to get noticed, play "loud and fast". i'm not saying we should all do that, because the band is not all about us, but it does work.
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Old 08-24-2010, 06:46 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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Originally Posted by Pocket-full-of-gold View Post
Harry Conway once said something in a thread, not unlike this one and I've been hangin' to "steal it" ever since.

It went something like........"95% of the audience may or may not have been aware that there were some drums on stage"..........brilliant!! (thanks H)

Never put much thought into what benchmarks a punter would use to rate my playing. Personally, as long as they dig the music, have a good time, leave happy and hopefully want to come back, then I consider whatever it is that I'm doing must be working.
That's an awesome quote. I mean, the way I see it, since my band just plays covers, I notice people get the most excited when we play a song that a lot of people like. And if you were to think about it from their perspective, they're not thinking, "Oh! I love this song because the drums are so tough to play!" or "That drum part is so exciting!" It's just because they know the song, and are exciting to see a live band playing it.

That being said, I suppose if the song has a particularly noticeable drum part, or an instantly recognizable fill, then that may be a reason why the audience likes the song, and they'll get excited when they hear that part being played. But for the rock/pop that my band plays (Red Hot Chili Peppers, Vampire Weekend, Weezer, etc.), most of the time, the songs are known for having a nice, steady 4/4 rock beat. It's often not the most stand-out part of the song, and it will probably go right over the audience's head. For the songs that we play, I think the audience will probably get most excited by the melody/vocal line that they recognize, or just from the overall energy of a live band (part of which may come from the drumming, but your average non-musician will probably realize that). That's just the way I see it. But there are a lot of different bands and a lot of different audiences out there, so it could vary depending on the situation.
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Old 08-24-2010, 06:52 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

Just thinking it through further we had a band practice last night and we're doing a Joe Cocker version of With A Little Help Of My Friends. I was playing a kit that I wasn't used to which never helps but as it was a new song for us as a band I was pushing the boundaries to see what I could do with it.
On some of the fills I know I was way out and missing beats as well playing 32nd notes but they were loud and over the top and the other guys thought they were great and whilst they're not drummers they are very competant musicians and I was suprised they weren't chastising me.
It's one of those if I can tighten them up for when we do a gig then I'll use them but if I don't feel they're tight enough I'll do something else instead but the others will probably be saying how come you didn't do that fill.
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Old 08-25-2010, 01:43 AM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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Originally Posted by stasz View Post
or just from the overall energy of a live band (part of which may come from the drumming,
So true Stasz, a band is the sum of many parts. The drummer is just one of them. I think the generally, punters really only lock into what those "parts" are creating as a unit. My wife is not musical, she can't identify bass lines, pick out keyboard parts or hear a kick drum or hi hat unless I point them out to her......she just "listens to the music"......or predominately the "melody/vocal line " that you referred to.

I really don't think she's that far removed from the rest of the genral listening public, to be honest.
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Old 08-25-2010, 02:01 AM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

i've seen so many down right terrible bands play around here. i mean really bad, out of tune, out of time, vocals sound like your beating a trash can with a dying cat. and i hear the people walk away saying they were so bad ass, they rock, their awesome. and for the longest time i couldn't understand why until i really looked at it from something other then a musicians point of view.

i see 2 things really, these guys play songs people recognize, they hear then on the radio all the time and they can sing along and dance to it (even if it's being played badly) then they get out with the audience and interact, get the crowd moving get them singing along and make them part of the show, people dig that.

on the opposite side of the coin i've seen superb musicians, tons of skill, sound incredible yet stand there and do nothing but stare at thier instrument and play then done. and the audience just sits there talking amongst themselves like no band is even playing. when you ask them what they thought of the band they look at you and ask "what band? oh them? they were ok i guess".

i would say it goes back to the energy you deliver rather then how well your playing. if you can harness both you'll be in the spot light for a long long time....
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Old 08-25-2010, 02:39 AM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

In my opinion the drummer along with the singer make or break a band. Guitar, bass bleah you can get away with blooddy murder if you have a great drummer and vocalist....

Vice versa - you have a great guitarist but the drummer lacks that steady - confident
on-time playing and your vocalist is off pitch.....forget about it!!!

Then again if your guitar is out of tune - you have no business being on stage in the first place.

I have played with many drummers over the years (I am first a guitar player) and there is a HUGE difference between an OK drummer and a great drummer and it's not in the chops either - it's that solid groove laid so deep the rest can't help but fall in place.....

Chops don't mean a thing in the real world musical sense if there;'s not that fundamental
solid timing behind it....and I think the audience can pick up on that even if they don't know exactly what it is....

Bottom line take a great band and give them a crappy drummer and I bet most of the audience would pick it out in a heart beat and say that band sucks.....

The drummer is underrated - he is THE foundation. and if that foundation is shakey...
the house WILL crumble....

I won't even entertain the idea of being in a band with a so-so drummer anymore
the difference is so night and day it's not even funny.
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Old 08-25-2010, 07:35 AM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

What gets noticed is contrast. If you do the same thing all night, it becomes wallpaper. No matter how sophisticated, loud, or wild. It's when you catch people off guard that they notice you. So the trick becomes to catch them off guard with something they like. Dynamics, playing a big fat groove for 3/4s of the song and then dropping a cool gospel fill that maintains the groove into the song right when the band it peaking. Busy here, open there.
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Old 08-25-2010, 09:35 AM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

This might apply here:

I recall an old Max Roach interview where he said he was partaking in some jazz drum night, and the big stars came out to play and wow the crowd. Max, Elvin, among others went up on stage to show how strong they were to the audience. I'm sure it was a flurry of notes and licks. Then here comes Gene Krupa at the end of it, and all he did was his Sing Sing Sing solo (basically 8ths notes on a floor tom), and the crowd goes wild! Max said that was a great drum lesson that night.

I think (if everything else in the band is equal) great drummers know when to play above the audience and when not to. If the songs are grooving and people are dancing and drinking, then you're doing your job and you're good. If you can go over their heads for a bit, and continue to make the audience dance, drink and have a good time, then you're still good!

One of my biggest lessons was when I figured out why my band kept getting fired from steady gigs. Musically, we made ourselves happy by "experimenting" with tunes, when the audience just wants to hear the 3-minute version so they can stop dancing at the end of it. Once they stop dancing, they stop drinking, and the bar isn't making money. Why do you think DJs are so popular?

I think the modern drummer gets really caught up in working on his craft. And sometimes that's a good thing. We can always have better polyrhythms and better grooves in 17/16, but the key to success is to know when to forget everything and make everybody feel good. If you're at a Greek wedding that means grooving in 7 and 13 alot. If you're in Alabama then you better not stray too far from what Butch Trucks and Jaimo Johnson played in the Allman Brothers! And everything in between.

I would say that since the audience is what pays you, then thats who you play to. If an artist is paying me, then it's my job to make him happy. And really, alot of drummers say "grooving with the band" as if it's an easy thing to do, and everybody can do it. I've been watching alot of drummers on YouTube putting up their stuff lately, and alot of people really need to get the 'grooving' part down. That's really your bread and butter. But do continue to work on every page of Gary Chester's New Breed, or whatever the hard book is today, too!
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Old 08-25-2010, 06:18 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

Ah, doggone it, Bo, I liked your last avatar better!

To the OP: a lot of good opinions here, and let me add in my $.02: Joe Public doesn't necessarily know what makes a good song. He doesn't necessarily hear a bad band and cringe, either. Does the music make him feel good? That might be accomplished as easily as playing his favorite song at least recognizably.

Audiences appreciate something that drives the music forward. A strong beat will do that. Audiences can easily get confused on anything other than 4/4, so if you DO do music that isn't 4/4 it has to be "telegraphed" so that they can get it. Otherwise you'll lose them, both in the figurative and literal sense of the word.

The drummer is NOT the focus of the band from the audience's point of view, so long as they are serving the music and not obviously screwing up all over the place. At one gig a rack clamp broke and half my kit fell over. I kept playing on what was still standing as best I could (and amusingly enough as I look back at it, despite my desperate attempts to get my wife-slash-roadie to come help, she didn't know anything was the matter). The audience didn't even seem to notice or care, since I was keeping the band and the music going forward.

The performances that in my mind stand out as the worst ever, still resulted in someone coming up to me at the end and complimenting me on how "I killed it" out there. That means they didn't even know how horrible the set felt to me - I was able to make it feel good to them.

As a final note: Joe Public doesn't know what's hard or easy about playing drums, and he doesn't care about your years of studying Stick Control, The New Breed or Syncopation. He wouldn't know a Moeller stroke if you hit him on the head with one, and single and double strokes sound the same from the 20th row. He doesn't know if you bury the beater or bounce it, use heel-up or heel down, or even that there's a pedal back there. But Joey Jordison's kit flips upside down with him on it while he plays steady 16th notes. "He's an awesome drummer." Why is that? Showmanship. One word.
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Old 08-25-2010, 07:12 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

2 votes for the return of Monique Bo...

Great post Al. Musically speaking, we talk Greek, the audience talks Sesame Street.

I believe you have to dumb it down for them to enjoy it, generally speaking.

There's only a few things that a non musician audience member notices.
1. If they know the song
2. If the show they see entertains them
3. If they like it or not

It's really very simple to them, they either like it or not, or don't care. But they don't dissect it, they have other, more pressing concerns. (their buzz, who they want to get next to etc.)

Now the musicians in the audience...we're not discussing them, different take.
But for the non musicians, they want a show of some sort. If the music is so so, but the show is good, that'll work for them.

If audience members had to pick a show that has:

1. Great music, but no real entertainment...or
2. So so music and a great engaging, entertaining show..

They'll pick #2 everytime.

What's in it for them? That's the bottom line. 4 way coordination? They couldn't care less, was it fun for them?
The audience, like girls, just wanna have fun. It's simple. Show them a good time, whatever that means. The music is secondary, the show is what they are looking for.
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Old 08-25-2010, 10:20 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

A lot of what Al said.

I play in an originals band and for most of the audience they are hearing songs for the first time. Despite this, I always get complimented on my drumming at the end of a gig. Now I am never really sure why, I don't play anything that could be considered very flash, or anything that stands out, but I always get compliments, form drummers and non drummers.

I find it strange that anyone has even noticed me as there is six of us in the band including banjo and fiddle. I have been told I put a lot of energy into my drumming, but I don't even think that I really do that.

So as for what the audience is looking for in a drummer, it sure isn't the same as what I'm looking for.

I think the best thing is to not worry, just play what you want and what makes you and your band happy and the audience will pick up on that. Like Al says, trying to be flash is lost on most non drummers, just be yourself and play with your own style, that's what makes music good to watch.
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Old 08-25-2010, 10:41 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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I play in an originals band and for most of the audience they are hearing songs for the first time. Despite this, I always get complimented on my drumming at the end of a gig. Now I am never really sure why, I don't play anything that could be considered very flash, or anything that stands out, but I always get compliments, form drummers and non drummers.
It could be just a factor of your natural feel--you could have a great sense of groove, a great feel, but not think much about it, because that's just the way you play.

As a listener, I'm a big fan of drummers like Charlie Watts, Ringo Starr, and Phil Rudd (and lots of guys with a similar approach but who were slightly flashier, like Peter Criss). A lot of it is the feel those guys play(ed) with, which came down to factors that are so subtle that they're hardly analyzable--and it's nothing conscious they were doing aside from not trying to be too flashy. It's just the way they naturally played. It's kinda like a gorgeous girl not being able to figure out why everyone is going all gaga over her. It could be nothing she's doing consciously, and to her, she just looks like a normal person.

It's also not that I admire those players because I take a similar approach myself. I'm a very busy player--probably someone who a lot of folks would consider to overplay. If I were playing "Satisfaction" I'd approach it--at least as far as I could get away with it--more like a combination of, say, Bill Bruford, Elvin Jones, Carl Palmer, Jack DeJohnette, Mitch Mitchell and Terry Bozzio, lol.
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Old 08-26-2010, 12:48 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

Couple of other things I thought worth adding, when I've been to open mic nights and heard what I know aren't great drummers playing (these are other musicians comments not just my opinion, one of thems commonly nicknamed one beat Pete) and yet I've still sat and thought some of it sounds great.
I think how you hear it from behing the kit and how it's heard from the front are very different and always sounds better from the front.
I also think if you asked a general audience to listen to "Vinnie's" reknowned fill at 3.15 in Nik Kershaw's "Don't Ask Me" and to listen to the drum intro of "In The Air Tonight" I'll put money on it virtually every none drummer says the "In The Air Tonight" intro is better drumming.
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Old 08-27-2010, 08:53 AM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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Couple of other things I thought worth adding, when I've been to open mic nights and heard what I know aren't great drummers playing (these are other musicians comments not just my opinion, one of thems commonly nicknamed one beat Pete) and yet I've still sat and thought some of it sounds great.
Was One Beat Pete's beat the money beat? :)
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Old 08-27-2010, 08:57 AM
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Was One Beat Pete's beat the money beat? :)
There's a hundred in it for you, if you can say that 10 times quickley.

That's worse than "she sells sea shells....." :-)
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Old 08-27-2010, 12:05 PM
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There's a hundred in it for you, if you can say that 10 times quickly.

That's worse than "she sells sea shells....." :-)
LOL, never thought of that, although I knew the sentence was clunky. I'm guessing that it was a $ beat, though
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Old 08-27-2010, 02:21 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

In general non musicians have no clue what the drummer does or plays. I sign of a good drummer is the band sounds great and people are dancing.
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Old 08-27-2010, 03:40 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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Was One Beat Pete's beat the money beat? :)
Don't be silly Pol, everyone knows the money beat is only for uber advanced players (he says whilst doing a Denis Chambers 16's shuffle with one hand and drinking a glass of wine with the other)!
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Old 08-27-2010, 04:32 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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If audience members had to pick a show that has:

1. Great music, but no real entertainment...or
2. So so music and a great engaging, entertaining show..

They'll pick #2 everytime.

What's in it for them? That's the bottom line. 4 way coordination? They couldn't care less, was it fun for them?
The audience, like girls, just wanna have fun. It's simple. Show them a good time, whatever that means. The music is secondary, the show is what they are looking for.
Exactly. I think most non-drummer audience members appreciate a show much better than a musically tight band on stage. Look at most popular music; there isn't much to think about, it's mostly about show.
Another example is look at how many non-drummers got excited about the 'drummer at the wrong gig' guy. Not to knock his talent, but there are many more talented drummers that aren't even on a non-drummer's radar. Who is your average non-drummer more familiar with? Steve Gadd or 'that sparkly yellow jacket guy'?
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Old 08-27-2010, 04:36 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

You know this question has bugged me a lot and I think I can make a generalisation but not a certain response. I would say most of it doesn't come down to what you play but how you play it.

I will say that two huge factors are tightness and confidence. If the drummer is tight with the band and glues everyone together, you are half way there.

Showing confidence is the other strength kind of like how 'chicks dig confidence'. If you can make something look easy (even if it is easy) most people will think it is neat. A lot of it is about the vibe you give off when drumming.

Unfortunately I can say that a lot of unconfident drummers that I have seen don't really get compliments from the audience because they just look like they are struggling all of the time even if they play fine.

Enjoying yourself is one way to show your confidence and once that sets in, it transfers to the audience too.
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Old 08-27-2010, 10:30 PM
bob2loud bob2loud is offline
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

For the non-musician audience, a drummer's showmanship is definitely the key. Years ago I set my kit set up so it required a lot of unnecessary, dramatic jumping, flailing, and swivelling, like Shawn Pelton or Animal on the Muppets. I overplayed most everything and when people complimented me I went even further over the top.

Over the years my time, chops, and dynamics, have all improved, I've learned what NOT to play, and have cut my kit down to a more compact size. Even though I feel that I do a much better job now, I get fewer compliments on my own playing, but more people tell me how much they enjoyed the band. I guess that's what really matters.
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Old 08-29-2010, 08:52 AM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

This is a great topic. I started college out as a music major but found other interests soon thereafter. Many of my friends stayed in the jazz program and I play with them often to this day. They're always working on their chops, a different time signature, transcribing solos and other such things. This has truly done wonders for their technical ability, but they are not taught showmanship (nor do I think anyone can "teach" you art in a literal sense, but that's for another thread).

When it comes down to it, who cares what the hell you're playing if you look bored as hell on stage. When you look bored, I guarantee your audience WILL BE bored; no matter what you're playing.

I've been getting a lot of compliments (and interest from the lady-folk) lately because of two things I have been working on; time and showmanship. The audience will know if you A) look un-confident behind the kit, B) drop the time, or C) look bored. Thusly, I spend time with my metronome, look like I know what the hell I'm doing behind the kit (which is an illusion), and get really really into it. At the end of some songs when I do the obligatory cymbals flourishes I'll stick my tongue out and shake my head back and forth. It sounds weird, but I saw Derek Trucks's drummer do it, and, in the moment it really adds excitement. Smile, groove, move your torso! It's the little things like that combined with confidence and perfect time. Look at AC/DC's drummer; no technical masterpiece, but no one who isn't a drummer would know that.
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Old 08-29-2010, 03:43 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

Drummers are highly underrated.
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Old 08-31-2010, 01:38 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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Was One Beat Pete's beat the money beat? :)
For him ............ Sadly Not :-)
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Old 08-31-2010, 01:51 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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I know what most drummers consider good drumming (I know there are a wide variety of opinions about groove and chops) but what does the audience (non-musicians) consider good drumming?
You speak of the audience as if its a single group of people but I'm assuming you mean non-musician music lovers. I think they largely have a tendency to view music as a whole and not in pieces or a sum of the parts, unlike us who like to break down things and consider them from a micro point of view.

The audience mostly is looking for things that move them. Emotionally and/ or physically. The spectrum can go from nodding your head to head banging or from make you feeling good to making you feeling suicidal.

Powerful thing, this musc stuff.

From a drumming standpoint that can come from as many directions as there are drummers and styles of drumming, but whatever makes that music elicit a physical or emotional response is what the listeners connect with.

No rules as such, though I suspect 'honesty' has a tendency to work with audiences more often than not.

PS- ( on second thoughts, I'll add another attribute to the honesty bit - heavy marketing and promotion )

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Old 08-31-2010, 04:28 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

Well said, Abe!

The hard part in creating rather than consuming music (food or art or wine or whatever) is we have to focus on the aspects that make the story congruent - getting the song to sit right. For the audience, all that dedicated behind-the-scenes work is a given.

They're just on the lookout for all the cool stuff you can add on top, usually by the singer or soloist. All they seem to want from us drummers is to be tight, responsive to what's going on, and to hit them with that primal drum vibe that we all love.
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Old 08-31-2010, 06:06 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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Who is your average non-drummer more familiar with? Steve Gadd or 'that sparkly yellow jacket guy'?
Yeah, I can tell by the number of non drummers who posted that on my facebook wall.
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Old 08-31-2010, 07:18 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

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The audience mostly is looking for things that move them. Emotionally and/ or physically. The spectrum can go from nodding your head to head banging or from make you feeling good to making you feeling suicidal.
Yeah, most folks who aren't musicians that I know well would say that the best drummer(s) is whoever is playing for their favorite musical artists. So answers for particular people, friends and family, I'm thinking of would be "Charlie Watts", "Ringo Starr", "Max Weinberg","Lars Ulrich", "Graeme Edge", "Brandon Barnes", etc. It's just whoever plays for their favorite band. Part of it is surely thinking, "That's the music that sounds best to me, and that's the drummer for that music, so that person must have a lot to do with making that music sound so good". I agree that non-musicians I do not know do not tend to separate what they're hearing into "the guitarist is doing that, and the keyboardist is doing that and the drummer is doing that". They only tend to single out what particular musicians are doing if they're playing a solo, as in "No one else is on stage".
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Old 09-01-2010, 07:08 AM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

And here we come back to the Joey Jordison winning the best drummer of the last 25 years contest. Whether he is or not, he is the most popular and has the most fans who felt compelled to vote for him, whether because they like Slipknot or because they like his showmanship or because they really believe he is the best drummer. So that right there points out a lot of what the "audience" is looking for, in my mind.
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Old 09-01-2010, 02:54 PM
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Default Re: Good drumming to the audience

It kinda makes me sad to think that the world is looking for more Travis Barkers and Joey Jordisons.
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