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  #1  
Old 12-04-2018, 03:33 PM
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Default Your Moment of Glory

Is there one drumming event in your memory that surpasses all others? Whether you're a basement hacker or a seasoned pro, there may be one outstanding day when you passed the audition, got the gig, impressed the girl and/or had a blast.

For me it was in college at a Stage Band Competition. I'd been to these before with mixed results and honestly was just hoping not to blow it for the band. We did our three songs and took our seats to listen to the adjudicator's critique. He said "Who's the drummer? Stand up!", and then had the entire band give me a round of applause for doing such a good job of leading and guiding them. AND we won the competition. AND to top it all off, my longsuffering parents happened to be there that day, although they hadn't attended any of the others.

Just shows to go ya', every dog can have his day. I've had some good drumming experiences since then, but none that can touch that one.

What about you?
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Old 12-04-2018, 04:55 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

I can't remember any one event. Maybe when I got the Uncle Larry title thanks to WhoIs? However I do remember some of the genuine compliments I've received from the other players and the audience members over the years. One that sticks out in particular: After the last set of a band I was in in 2006, a woman sauntered over to me and said that my playing was...decadent.

That still makes me smile.
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  #3  
Old 12-04-2018, 05:21 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

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Originally Posted by larryace View Post
a woman sauntered over to me and said that my playing was...decadent. That still makes me smile.
Yeah, I'd still be smiling too :)
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  #4  
Old 12-04-2018, 05:22 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Back in the day, 1968, our band was playing a small gig, at a park in the afternoon, and a lady approached and asked if we did private parties. Our leader said of course. We were making like 10 bucks a piece at the park Gig and she offered us 35 bucks each plus a meal and beer. Tips as I remembre it were also good from the party guests. Was a great day/night
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  #5  
Old 12-04-2018, 05:24 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Here in the deep south, there used to be huge gospel shows with several touring groups. I guess my biggest moment would be opening the show at 12 years old; running up on stage and looking out at a wall of people in the stands (football stadium). I thought my heart was going to beat out of my chest. As soon as we hit the first note, all the fear disappeared and we had a blast. Then getting to hang out with all of these touring pros for several hours.

Hard to believe that was 48 years ago...
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  #6  
Old 12-04-2018, 05:28 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Just getting the nod from my guitar & bass players. That look they give you when you do something right. Love those moments.
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  #7  
Old 12-04-2018, 05:39 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

The first time somebody told me that I was a good drummer!

Our high school days cover band was invited to play a Sears grand opening. The event was covered live on KAAY-AM. One of the songs we played was "Fire" by The Jimi Hendrix Experience. During one of the following breaks, a couple of guys older than I approached me, saying they'd driven to the event to see the drummer who'd nailed Mitch Mitchell's part in the song.

It's amazing how something as simple as a compliment can be a hydro-boost to one's confidence. I was on cloud nine that day!

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  #8  
Old 12-04-2018, 06:00 PM
brentcn brentcn is offline
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Not exactly my moment, but it was glorious...

A while back I had an adult student, Kevin, who, after teaching him on and off for 10 years, and becoming a good friend, was diagnosed with cancer. With approximately 6 months to live, his dying wish was to put on a concert for his friends, family, and relatives -- to create a positive, loving way to say goodbye. He chose 10 songs to play and sing on guitar, and took some lessons to learn them. The school's owners rented out a small theater, and the instructors in the school comprised his band. His 10 year old son learned a song on drums for the concert, in some private lessons with me. A few weeks along, Kevin brought an oxygen tank with him to the rehearsals.

The 400-person theater sold out. Relatives from all over the country traveled to Michigan, and we played to a packed house. Every song referenced a particular life event, friend, or sentiment, and Kevin told us and the crowd about what each song meant for him. The son played wonderfully along to California Stars by Wilco. Kevin asked the crowd to hold up their phones during this song, and in the dark theater, it looked like stars.

On the last note of the last song, we played a big fermata, rock-and-roll ending, and the crowd was loud. Kevin looked back at me, smiled, swung his Strat down, and we ended the concert. A few weeks later, he was gone.
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  #9  
Old 12-04-2018, 06:45 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Quote:
Originally Posted by brentcn View Post
On the last note of the last song, we played a big fermata, rock-and-roll ending, and the crowd was loud. Kevin looked back at me, smiled, swung his Strat down, and we ended the concert. A few weeks later, he was gone.
There have been some great stories already, but that one's going be hard to top!
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  #10  
Old 12-04-2018, 07:23 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

About twenty years ago, I was in an ordinary cover band. We played about once a week, for around $300 split among the three of us, and an agent got a cut, too. The guitar player wanted (and got) more money for "depreciation" on his PA. I was tired of moving it all in my van, that somehow didn't have the same "depreciation" issue... Most bar owners and personnel were very kind to us, except this one large restaurant and bar in a resort town.

The contract said we got free food and beer, but they always had an excuse not to feed us, and only grudgingly let us have a few beers. Summer season was winding down, and I knew we would lose our regular gig there, so I drank twenty pints of Newcastle ale to have a better attitude about the whole thing.

Three o'clock in the morning and the bar owner is yelling about how he's not going to pay us because I drank $90 worth of ale, "get out of my club", blah blah. He actually threw our pay at us... I never played with them again.


Six months later, I got a call at 9:00pm Friday night on Memorial Day weekend from a friend whose drummer did not show up for a gig at the same bar that threw me out. There was 500 + people who paid $5 to see a band, and no drummer. Luckily, I kept the drums in my van in those days, so I grabbed a clean shirt and hurried over to the venue.

Since the show was late, people were carrying my drums into the bar for me, as I unloaded. I could hear the bar erupt in a loud cheer as the drums were carried onto the stage.

I wound up playing there three nights a week for the next six months (until the cruise ships stopped in late fall) for $175 a night, and all the beer I wanted. They still would only feed us if we showed up before three in the afternoon, though.

Hearing the crowd cheer, getting paid a decent amount of money, and seeing Big Pete Pearson turn around and smile at me during the first song was the biggest thrill of my music "career". That, and the cheap club owner was forced to eat crow all summer, and serve me beer. They went out of business a few years later. I never did hear what happened to the drummer I replaced. Big Pete moved back to AZ, and that was that.

Last edited by Ghostin one; 12-04-2018 at 07:36 PM.
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  #11  
Old 12-04-2018, 07:24 PM
J-Boogie J-Boogie is offline
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Quote:
Originally Posted by brentcn View Post
Not exactly my moment, but it was glorious...

A while back I had an adult student, Kevin, who, after teaching him on and off for 10 years, and becoming a good friend, was diagnosed with cancer. With approximately 6 months to live, his dying wish was to put on a concert for his friends, family, and relatives -- to create a positive, loving way to say goodbye. He chose 10 songs to play and sing on guitar, and took some lessons to learn them. The school's owners rented out a small theater, and the instructors in the school comprised his band. His 10 year old son learned a song on drums for the concert, in some private lessons with me. A few weeks along, Kevin brought an oxygen tank with him to the rehearsals.

The 400-person theater sold out. Relatives from all over the country traveled to Michigan, and we played to a packed house. Every song referenced a particular life event, friend, or sentiment, and Kevin told us and the crowd about what each song meant for him. The son played wonderfully along to California Stars by Wilco. Kevin asked the crowd to hold up their phones during this song, and in the dark theater, it looked like stars.

On the last note of the last song, we played a big fermata, rock-and-roll ending, and the crowd was loud. Kevin looked back at me, smiled, swung his Strat down, and we ended the concert. A few weeks later, he was gone.
Wow this one got me today! Life can be a stunningly beautiful and stunningly painful at the same time. Not posting my moment now, just wanted to stop and appreciate this post.
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  #12  
Old 12-04-2018, 07:46 PM
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philrudd philrudd is offline
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Quote:
Originally Posted by brentcn View Post
Not exactly my moment, but it was glorious...

A while back I had an adult student, Kevin, who, after teaching him on and off for 10 years, and becoming a good friend, was diagnosed with cancer. With approximately 6 months to live, his dying wish was to put on a concert for his friends, family, and relatives -- to create a positive, loving way to say goodbye. He chose 10 songs to play and sing on guitar, and took some lessons to learn them. The school's owners rented out a small theater, and the instructors in the school comprised his band. His 10 year old son learned a song on drums for the concert, in some private lessons with me. A few weeks along, Kevin brought an oxygen tank with him to the rehearsals.

The 400-person theater sold out. Relatives from all over the country traveled to Michigan, and we played to a packed house. Every song referenced a particular life event, friend, or sentiment, and Kevin told us and the crowd about what each song meant for him. The son played wonderfully along to California Stars by Wilco. Kevin asked the crowd to hold up their phones during this song, and in the dark theater, it looked like stars.

On the last note of the last song, we played a big fermata, rock-and-roll ending, and the crowd was loud. Kevin looked back at me, smiled, swung his Strat down, and we ended the concert. A few weeks later, he was gone.
Wow.

Thanks for sharing. This one's going to stay with me a while...
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  #13  
Old 12-04-2018, 08:06 PM
brentcn brentcn is offline
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Quote:
Originally Posted by PlayTheSong View Post
There have been some great stories already, but that one's going be hard to top!
Quote:
Wow this one got me today! Life can be a stunningly beautiful and stunningly painful at the same time. Not posting my moment now, just wanted to stop and appreciate this post.
Thanks guys. What's really cool is that, whenever somebody asks about my best, or biggest, or craziest gig, I get to tell them about that gig.

Quote:
the cheap club owner was forced to eat crow all summer, and serve me beer.
This is awesome!
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  #14  
Old 12-04-2018, 08:29 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Quote:
Originally Posted by brentcn View Post
Not exactly my moment, but it was glorious...

A while back I had an adult student, Kevin, who, after teaching him on and off for 10 years, and becoming a good friend, was diagnosed with cancer. With approximately 6 months to live, his dying wish was to put on a concert for his friends, family, and relatives -- to create a positive, loving way to say goodbye. He chose 10 songs to play and sing on guitar, and took some lessons to learn them. The school's owners rented out a small theater, and the instructors in the school comprised his band. His 10 year old son learned a song on drums for the concert, in some private lessons with me. A few weeks along, Kevin brought an oxygen tank with him to the rehearsals.

The 400-person theater sold out. Relatives from all over the country traveled to Michigan, and we played to a packed house. Every song referenced a particular life event, friend, or sentiment, and Kevin told us and the crowd about what each song meant for him. The son played wonderfully along to California Stars by Wilco. Kevin asked the crowd to hold up their phones during this song, and in the dark theater, it looked like stars.

On the last note of the last song, we played a big fermata, rock-and-roll ending, and the crowd was loud. Kevin looked back at me, smiled, swung his Strat down, and we ended the concert. A few weeks later, he was gone.
I'm not crying, you're crying. : (
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  #15  
Old 12-04-2018, 08:53 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Man, the thread should stop after Kevin's story. That was beautiful.

My feeble offering is when I was moving and had to leave the band I was in. We decided to play a farewell show at the same coffeehouse where we had our first gig - that one was acoustic and unplugged, this one was not. The coffeehouse had a back room for music acts that maybe seated thirty; it filled past capacity, and they used cameras to beam the show out to the rest of the coffeehouse which was also packed. There were band photos and flyers on all the tables in the place, and CDs for sale at the counter. We had a projector and were showing a slideshow of all sorts of photos of us at gigs, photo shoots, old show flyers, etc. as we played for about three hours - by far our best show ever. Afterwards we all said a few words, thanked the fans, and headed across the street to a bar where we partied until two in the morning.
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  #16  
Old 12-04-2018, 11:44 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

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Originally Posted by alparrott View Post
Man, the thread should stop after Kevin's story. That was beautiful.
+1 !
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  #17  
Old 12-05-2018, 01:40 AM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Opened for Bon Jovi in 2005. First and only large arena show. Never topped that one and will never forget the thrill of playing for that many people. Unfortunately the band disolved a few months later.
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  #18  
Old 12-05-2018, 01:57 AM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Quote:
Originally Posted by brentcn View Post
Not exactly my moment, but it was glorious...

A while back I had an adult student, Kevin, who, after teaching him on and off for 10 years, and becoming a good friend, was diagnosed with cancer. With approximately 6 months to live, his dying wish was to put on a concert for his friends, family, and relatives -- to create a positive, loving way to say goodbye. He chose 10 songs to play and sing on guitar, and took some lessons to learn them. The school's owners rented out a small theater, and the instructors in the school comprised his band. His 10 year old son learned a song on drums for the concert, in some private lessons with me. A few weeks along, Kevin brought an oxygen tank with him to the rehearsals.

The 400-person theater sold out. Relatives from all over the country traveled to Michigan, and we played to a packed house. Every song referenced a particular life event, friend, or sentiment, and Kevin told us and the crowd about what each song meant for him. The son played wonderfully along to California Stars by Wilco. Kevin asked the crowd to hold up their phones during this song, and in the dark theater, it looked like stars.

On the last note of the last song, we played a big fermata, rock-and-roll ending, and the crowd was loud. Kevin looked back at me, smiled, swung his Strat down, and we ended the concert. A few weeks later, he was gone.
That's truly great. Just a lovely story. Brought a lump to my throat.
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  #19  
Old 12-05-2018, 04:59 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Being in the rockabilly scene we played a Rockabilly Bash show with the Rhythm Dragons and their drummer Bob Stubbs (of Social D fame) taught me how to play standing up.
We played our set and everything just clicked for me. How to move, how to show energy...the works.
Lost my voice singing gang vocals & the set was just a blast.

I've used that one lesson from him on every show since.
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Old 12-05-2018, 09:47 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

I really have never had a single moment like that. Or maybe I did, but I was so focused on getting it right that I never took time to notice. I think about Larryace's observation about the person serving the drinks can't be getting drunk, that when you're playing music, you have to focus on doing what needs to be done, not getting so immersed in it that you lose your focus.



But anyway, brentcn's story is gonna be hard to top. That's beautiful, man.
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  #21  
Old 12-05-2018, 10:16 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Over a career that has spanned 30+ years, I've had a few moments that stood out where things fell into place, and I came away very satisfied, although keep in mind most of mine aren't related to drumming, but rather my career as a trumpet player.

Once was rendering "Taps" at a funeral at a small family plot on the side of a mountain in Pennsylvania during my first enlistment as an Army trumpet player. It was cold - around 29 degrees, and the air was really still with just a touch of snow starting to fall. I got out of the car I'd been waiting in and played, and the sound of my horn just rang and echoed off of the surrounding mountainsides in that cold, still air. Of all of the times I've rendered "Taps," (Roughly 500) that's one that really stands out in my mind.

Another moment was doing the Spirit of America show at the Capitol Center/US Air Arena in front of a crowd of about 15,000 when I was in The Old Guard Fife & Drum Corps. We NAILED our show. When we came out of the drum feature for the final push, it was a thing where it transitioned from just spotlights on the drums to the whole floor being lit right as we stepped off, and the crowd went nuts and came to their feet in a roar of applause. The kicker for this one was that my mom happened to be in attendance, and it was the first time she'd gotten to see me perform since I'd gotten into The Old Guard FDC.

Then there were the Pentagon and White House arrival ceremonies for foreign dignitaries such as Akihito, the Emperor of Japan, Helmut Kohl, the Chancellor of Germany, King Hussein of Jordan, and Nelson Mandela. Nelson Mandela's ceremony was historic because he'd been considered "persona non grata" in the United States due to his life before imprisonment, and that had to be lifted before he could visit the White House.

Probably the most important things I ever did was to render "Taps" at funerals for members of the 14th Quartermaster Detachment from Greensburg, PA when their barracks got hit by a SCUD missile in Saudi Arabia during Desert Storm.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/14th_Q...Missile_Attack

I was stationed at Fort Meade, MD at the time, so they sent 4 of us out to Pittsburg - 3 buglers and a guy to do logistics - for a week so that we could perform military honors at those funerals around the Greensburg area.

It's hard to pick just one event that really stands out - I've been pretty blessed as a musician, especially considering I'm no better than I am.
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Old 12-06-2018, 09:10 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Our blues band played at The New Orleans Jazz Fest back in 1988. I got married a week later (and still am). That was a totally great ten days. Peace and goodwill.
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  #23  
Old 12-06-2018, 10:29 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

"You make my music sound so good!" -Cindy Morgan

I had the honor to sit in with Cindy Morgan for one show a year or so ago.

Her accomplishments:
21 #1 hits as a songwriter/performer
2 Grammy nominations
12 Dove Awards
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  #24  
Old 12-07-2018, 01:34 AM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

I've had a couple of shows where things gelled so well, I was on autopilot but not phoning it in- I was just a groovemaster who could do no wrong. No flubs, could play an occasional (tasteful, naturally) fill I hadn't done before but just flowed out of me really easy, as did sections that were loose enough to improv a bit. These performances were nearly spiritual.

My one original band that released an indie album had a CD release party that packed our regular hometown venue to beyond capacity before we hit the first note, and the crowd was wrapped around our metaphorical little finger for the entire show. That was a nice evening.

Now I'm gonna get a little immature... I've signed boobs several times (yes, different women, haha), and had a regular female fan (tall, slender, long blond hair, nice rack toms, haha) of one band I was in approach me between songs from the side of the stage, sit on my lap with her back to the kit (straddling me), took her shirt off, threw her arms around my neck, and told me to start the next song. I did exactly that- hidden from the audience and my bandmates behind her bare back, my arms reaching around her, I clicked the song in and played it flawlessly. (Luckily, it was fairly simple- a Clash or Social D tune.) No, it wasn't called Motorboat, but maybe it should've been...! :D She sit-danced on my lap through the tune.

I've also had the head-nods from bandmates, singer & other bandmates give me props between songs on-mic, pointed at & given applause by folks in the crowd who have danced like mad to our tunes all night, venue owners/managers give me/us praise, etc.

Then- perhaps there's a thread for this on here somewhere- there are the shows where it seemed the universe was conspiring to make my life hell, where it seemed I couldn't do *anything* right...!
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Old 12-07-2018, 02:01 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Quote:
Originally Posted by PorkPieGuy View Post
"You make my music sound so good!" -Cindy Morgan
Now that's a sweet, sweet compliment from a songwriter!
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  #26  
Old 12-07-2018, 04:23 PM
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Now that's a sweet, sweet compliment from a songwriter!
No joke! She's fantastic.
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  #27  
Old 12-07-2018, 09:31 PM
J-Boogie J-Boogie is offline
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

[quote=8Mile;1602247]I really have never had a single moment like that. Or maybe I did, but I was so focused on getting it right that I never took time to notice. I think about Larryace's observation about the person serving the drinks can't be getting drunk, that when you're playing music, you have to focus on doing what needs to be done, not getting so immersed in it that you lose your focus.



This is a good point. I need to keep this in my mind as I play at times. I can get swept up in the spirit and get a little carried away, happened last night, to be expected a bit, I never get to play and now I do again so oh boy it like Im chomping at the bit a bit. I think I got away with it because when I came too and opened my eyes lol all the guys were standing around me with big smiles on their faces, and have been teasing me about my solos and solo reprises and whatever lol. MAN ITS GREAT TO BE PLAYING AGAIN!!!!
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  #28  
Old 12-08-2018, 03:10 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

It was a support tour with a world renowned UK band a few years ago.

Played to thousands each night, we were given the main acts soundtechs and light technicians for no cost and were treated very, very well by them and their organisation. They were great.

I absolutely loved it and the band camaraderie during those dates but I know it's probably not going to happen again. Also very surreal signing autographs to audience members when I'm an absolute nobody.

Also being feet away from the main band each night and watching them soundcheck some of my most loved songs to a nearly empty venue. I felt very lucky and privileged for those experiences and I didn't take it for granted.

Due to the tour distances none of my loved ones could make any of the dates, which is a shame as I can't really talk to anyone about it who would get it (the band I was in is on an indefinite hiatus) I'd loved to have shared the experience with my other half (for example) so I remember it also being slightly bittersweet at the time.

However, a great experience to have had so I'm still very grateful and feel very lucky for the opportunity.
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  #29  
Old 12-09-2018, 05:39 AM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

I have had the opportunity of playing a few times with various members of the Chantays. One time the lead guitarist in my surf band got sick suddenly and Gil Orr agreed to fill in for him. After the gig he told me that I was the most sensitive drummer that he's played with. He didn't explain and I didn't ask, but I always get a big smile just thinking about it.
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Old 12-09-2018, 09:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Juniper View Post
It was a support tour with a world renowned UK band a few years ago.

Played to thousands each night, we were given the main acts soundtechs and light technicians for no cost and were treated very, very well by them and their organisation. They were great.

I absolutely loved it and the band camaraderie during those dates but I know it's probably not going to happen again. Also very surreal signing autographs to audience members when I'm an absolute nobody.

Also being feet away from the main band each night and watching them soundcheck some of my most loved songs to a nearly empty venue. I felt very lucky and privileged for those experiences and I didn't take it for granted.

Due to the tour distances none of my loved ones could make any of the dates, which is a shame as I can't really talk to anyone about it who would get it (the band I was in is on an indefinite hiatus) I'd loved to have shared the experience with my other half (for example) so I remember it also being slightly bittersweet at the time.

However, a great experience to have had so I'm still very grateful and feel very lucky for the opportunity.
Curious, who was the band?
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Old 12-10-2018, 02:34 AM
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Originally Posted by trickg View Post
Curious, who was the band?
New Order when they briefly changed their name to Bad Lieutenant following Peter Hooks departure. Their set pretty much compraised of New Order and Joy Division songs and it was unreal to witness each soundcheck/gig.
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Old 12-10-2018, 05:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Juniper View Post
New Order when they briefly changed their name to Bad Lieutenant following Peter Hooks departure. Their set pretty much comprised of New Order and Joy Division songs and it was unreal to witness each soundcheck/gig.
That's pretty danged cool - I've never done anything on that level.
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Old 12-10-2018, 07:04 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

When I was about age 15/16 my brother ( 4 years older and an awesome guitarist who has since passed) was friends a guy who knew Dee Snider of Twisted Sister. They were up and coming and just becoming big when I got to jam a couple of Zeppelin and Sabbath tunes with them . Although that was cool at the time and became more special to me later when they got huge,.........

My most honorable , memorable , and yet saddest moments in drumming were playing for dozens of funerals for police officers and firefighters ( some I knew personally) in the ensuing weeks and months after the September 11th attacks on the Twin Towers as a police officer in a law enforcement bag pipe band . Nothing in drumming has ever meant more to me than being able to honor their memories and their service and ultimate sacrifice . Very difficult time for me yet so meaningful to be able to show my respect to them and their families .
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Old 12-10-2018, 07:22 PM
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'had a regular female fan (tall, slender, long blond hair, nice rack toms, haha) of one band I was in approach me between songs from the side of the stage, sit on my lap with her back to the kit (straddling me), took her shirt off, threw her arms around my neck, and told me to start the next song. I did exactly that- hidden from the audience and my bandmates behind her bare back, my arms reaching around her, I clicked the song in and played it flawlessly. (Luckily, it was fairly simple- a Clash or Social D tune.) No, it wasn't called Motorboat, but maybe it should've been...! :D She sit-danced on my lap through the tune.'

If that was me, after she got off.

Singer: OK, we're just gonna take a short break, see ya in 10.

Me: Yeah, I think I'm just gonna sit here for a few minutes.

Singer: You don't want to come to the bar?

Me: No, I'm fine. Really. I just need to sit here for a few minutes, is all.

Singer: Come on! I'm buying.

Me *whispering*: Look I can't stand up! OK!
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Old 12-10-2018, 08:01 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Gotten a couple of these thru my IG account and they always make my day.
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Old 12-10-2018, 08:13 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

Nice William. They are some of the more meaningful things to me too, things that people take the time to write down.

A bunch of years ago I was half of a double drummer team in an Allman Brothers Tribute band, only for a handful of gigs, while they searched for a permanent guy. After we were done playing, this guy from the audience hands me a blue napkin with the words "you rock" written on it. It's the little things.

I still have that napkin.
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Old 12-10-2018, 11:57 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

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Originally Posted by trickg View Post
That's pretty danged cool - I've never done anything on that level.
Same before and after. Doubt it will happen again to be honest so I’m very grateful.

Couple of images I have of one of the dates. My kit is the Pearl up front ready for our support slot. Stephen Morris (New Orders) DW is in the background.
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Old 12-11-2018, 05:51 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

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Originally Posted by brentcn View Post
Not exactly my moment, but it was glorious...

A while back I had an adult student, Kevin, who, after teaching him on and off for 10 years, and becoming a good friend, was diagnosed with cancer. With approximately 6 months to live, his dying wish was to put on a concert for his friends, family, and relatives -- to create a positive, loving way to say goodbye. He chose 10 songs to play and sing on guitar, and took some lessons to learn them. The school's owners rented out a small theater, and the instructors in the school comprised his band. His 10 year old son learned a song on drums for the concert, in some private lessons with me. A few weeks along, Kevin brought an oxygen tank with him to the rehearsals.

The 400-person theater sold out. Relatives from all over the country traveled to Michigan, and we played to a packed house. Every song referenced a particular life event, friend, or sentiment, and Kevin told us and the crowd about what each song meant for him. The son played wonderfully along to California Stars by Wilco. Kevin asked the crowd to hold up their phones during this song, and in the dark theater, it looked like stars.

On the last note of the last song, we played a big fermata, rock-and-roll ending, and the crowd was loud. Kevin looked back at me, smiled, swung his Strat down, and we ended the concert. A few weeks later, he was gone.
I teared up reading this - awesome story!

I had two very well known and respected drummers come up to me after a gig and gave me some very nice compliments on my playing - my dumbass didn't even recognize/know who they were until after they had left and someone told me who they were.

In a different band we had a local show and our bass player swung by the club around 4:00 to drop off some gear. We get a phone call from him - there was one person at the venue - a guy from the UK who was a fan but missed us when we were over there earlier in the year, he heard we were playing and took a day off of work and flew over to see us. Needless to say, he got free merch, drinks, food and stayed with one of the band members. I was pretty blown away that someone would go to that length to see us.

Last edited by K Chez; 12-12-2018 at 06:44 PM.
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Old 12-13-2018, 08:17 PM
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Default Re: Your Moment of Glory

The time Simon Phillips saw me, and came right off the Toto bus to shake my hand and tell me how much he enjoyed my playing and the sound of my drums.

That was pretty awesome :-)
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