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  #1  
Old 02-27-2013, 09:50 PM
jaysticks jaysticks is offline
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Default Choosing a new top end kit

Currently researching kits, as I'm looking to replace my existing mapex saturn kit. This kit will be an all purpose kit, with a versatile sound, that will suit pop/funk/rock etc.
Thought I'd throw it out to you guys, for a little inspiration!

What I'm looking for is the highest quality, and most consistent instrument I can find, and I'm willing to spend extra for that quality. I want a kit that is warm, has cut and volume, but has character and doesn't sound generic like alot of modern kits do, and works with different heads, for different sounds. I think I prefer the drums with more rounded bearing edge, sounds more like a drum, rather than skin attack. The bass drum size on my current kit is a big reason to change, it's a 22x20 and I just find it sluggish in response, and a nightmare to transport. The highest quality drums that are hard to beat for consistency, and quality of build for me are Yamaha, but I'm aware that Sonor, Tama, and Dw makes really good stuff too,

Any suggestions, thoughts appreciated!
All the best.
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:03 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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Originally Posted by jaysticks View Post
The highest quality drums that are hard to beat for consistency, and quality of build for me are Yamaha .
It sounds like you want Yamaha, cant go wrong there. Oak or studio customs
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:14 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

Once again, Budget, then features, sizes, number of pieces, then finish..

You may want to read thru this.


http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...d.php?t=104568
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  #4  
Old 02-27-2013, 10:30 PM
jaysticks jaysticks is offline
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

I appreciate the nature of this post delves into the sea of choices and specifics in creating a drum sound, but there are companies that are producing a superior product than other brands, so I'm looking toward other drummer's experience as a little guidance or to maybe bring something to my attention that I've missed.
The sizes I'm interested in are 22x14/16 (shallower sized kick), 10x8,12x8, 14x14, 16x16 floors, the finish is less important although finishes that don't interfere with the shells sound and resonance are more preferable. I generally find kits suit different heads, and obviously certain woods have tonal differences, birch being brighter, and maple warmer etc imo!
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:34 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

I'll never be able to afford them, but check out GURU drums.

Ha! first one to suggest them! Others will be along shortly..
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:50 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

Your saying you want top quality but there's lots of room up there as far as price goes.Ludwig Legacy,the new Tama Star series which are hand made.Crovioto kits which are high four low five digits.C & C are making some great stuff and offer a range of differernt shells.

And our own Andy who make Guru at the very top end in quality sound,finish and price.

You have to specify a dollar amount beacause the sky really is the limit.Got 20K?

Steve B
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  #7  
Old 02-27-2013, 10:55 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

I thought the Saturns were great drums. People here swear by them. Why not get a smaller depth bass drum?
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  #8  
Old 02-27-2013, 11:16 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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Originally Posted by jaysticks View Post
I think I prefer the drums with more rounded bearing edge, sounds more like a drum, rather than skin attack.
Control & augmentation of the bearing edges is just one tool you can use to obtain a more characterful tone. If you're really talking high end instrument, then shell construction should be the very foundation of your choice. Achieving greater shell resonance, especially at lower dynamic, gives you sonic choices. How that resonance transfers to playing characteristics is then the job of bearing edges & wood species. Those are your static choices, leaving head choice & tuning to do their work according to the gig.

Reading through your brief selection of desirable features, I certainly think a hybrid approach to bearing edge specification is a good idea. I'd need to know more about your specific wish list to advise in more detail.

One last point about bass drum depth. It's perfectly possible to get a great sounding & articulate deeper bass drum, just as it's possible to get a very full sounding shallow bass drum. In both cases, it relies on all elements of the build being designed towards a specific goal.

Good luck in your search.
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  #9  
Old 02-27-2013, 11:24 PM
jaysticks jaysticks is offline
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

The saturns are good drums for the money, but they're limited in terms of tuning and head selection. They lack that quality that a top end Sonor, Yamaha, Tama etc would have.
I'm prepared to pay more, and I live in the UK. I'm familiar with Guru drums, but not sure the design is right for me, I don't particularly like the floating lug design they have.
The craviotto stuff looks great, but I've listened to all the different wood kits and can't really hear a massive difference between ash, and cherry for example.But that's one to consider.
The Tama star series do look nice, and also the ludwig legacy seems like a 60's ludwig with better hardware. Although thin shelled drums ring out, they generally don't project well acoustically, like a sonor prolite for example.
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:32 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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Originally Posted by jaysticks View Post
I'm familiar with Guru drums, but not sure the design is right for me, I don't particularly like the floating lug design they have.
The aesthetic isn't for everyone. Our new series is released in a few months time, & caters for those with a more traditional lug design taste, but as you'd expect from us, there's a performance twist ;)
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:37 PM
jaysticks jaysticks is offline
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

I understand what you're saying, and obviously respect your knowledge in dealing with custom drums. It's like when you want high quality, you're right you have to start with the nature of the shell, and it's design. Just from a matter of experience with different drum companies and their products, tuning on certain drums can be a problem (certain drums are easier to tune than others etc) so from the perspective of consistency of sound from a tuning perspective, the shells have to be high quality and designed to work together as a set. Just as an example Dave Weckl, who is a master tuner, and sound engineer aswell as player, chooses a brand that seems very consistent and is also supported by some of the best hardware, in my opinion.
I'm not an expert on bearing edges, 45's, rounded 45's, 60's, 30 (gretsch) etc. The more rounded edge drums do seem to be a bit more organic and woodier sounding, which I think is more of an interesting sound.
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:38 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

What do you feel is wrong with the quality? You know sonor uses the same factory as mapex for their chinese made drums right? If I was you I'd just order a 22x16.

Anyway I haven't tried guru drums but I have hit most of the top maple kits and I like the sleishman omega kits. The yamaha maple is prob another favourite.
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  #13  
Old 02-27-2013, 11:49 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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Originally Posted by jaysticks View Post
, the shells have to be high quality and designed to work together as a set.
Yes, critical to a cohesive sound.

Yamaha make good consistent drums, & their hardware is first class. Unless you're in a hurry, I strongly suggest you go & try some choices before putting your coin down.

A more rounded bearing edge to the batter side will deliver more shell tone & less head sustain, however, the same rounded form to the reso side may substantially shorten the drum's voice. It's nice to use a combination of edge forms to achieve the balance you seek, but the affect of edge augmentation depends on the shell's ability to react.

Good luck.

Last edited by keep it simple; 02-28-2013 at 12:30 AM.
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Old 02-28-2013, 01:29 AM
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  #14  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:10 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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Originally Posted by jaysticks View Post
What mainstream companies do you think make the best ply shells Andy?
The mixed bearing edge design has been exploited by sonor and gavin harrison recently, which is interesting and I know Craviotto have recently done the same thing.
All very interesting!
Kind of wrong asking a guy who makes drums for a living what other companies he recommends besides his.

Truth, Guru, Risen,Craviatto,SCJ,Yamaha,DW,Spaun, the list goes on. Only you, your budget and ears can decide what you like best. You really need to hit a store and try some out and see what you come up with.

You made a comment that the head selection for your current kit is limited, kind of curious why you say that, what heads have you tried that didn't work and why didn't they "work"?
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Old 02-28-2013, 02:20 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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Originally Posted by jaysticks View Post

The saturns are good drums for the money, but they're limited in terms of tuning and head selection. They lack that quality that a top end Sonor, Yamaha, Tama etc would have.
I'm prepared to pay more,...

Try all the high end drums you can. Buy the most expensive set you can find, and then you'll be happy.



LOL - but seriously, I agree with the quotes below:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bo Eder View Post
I thought the Saturns were great drums. People here swear by them. Why not get a smaller depth bass drum?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dre25 View Post
What do you feel is wrong with the quality? You know sonor uses the same factory as mapex for their chinese made drums right? If I was you I'd just order a 22x16....
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  #16  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:33 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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Kind of wrong asking a guy who makes drums for a living what other companies he recommends besides his.
Yes, that would usually be a bit awkward, but as the specific question was ply shells & from major manufacturers (now deleted I see), I don't have too much of an issue with it. I think Sonor's German built stuff is pretty difficult to beat. Other than Sonor, I'm not personally inspired by much from the majors. Frankly, the differences aren't huge in the top ranges of the majors. There are some more interesting ply shells being made by smaller guys though (e.g. Kumu & Brady)

I think the OP is somewhat torn between wanting something distinctive, yet with the apparent assurances of a major brand. I understand that position, but the truth is, it's those same major brands that deliver the close to generic sounds he's wishing to avoid.

My advice is to take time to try different stuff. If you're spending big money, then it's not unreasonable to suffer the cost of visiting some stockists, or even better, some exhibitions where you can try almost anything. Either that, or cut down the Saturn bass drum & wait until you fall in love with something :)
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  #17  
Old 02-28-2013, 02:54 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

I own a Saturn with a 22x20 bass drum and I can honestly say I've never had any issue with it's responsiveness, and if you're playing jazz then I would suggest you bought the wrong drum kit in the first place.

I can understand the preference for a more compact drum in terms of transport etc, but have you thought of trying different head/tension combinations before you buy a different kit? I went through a number of double pedals before realising that it wasn't the pedals but my lack of ability both physically and set up wise that were causing the issues
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  #18  
Old 02-28-2013, 03:24 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

After readin this string, and almost 50 years playing drums, and with every kit I was able to produce a sound that I like, as well as the listeners, I can only think of one word

Anal

My goodness. Best of luck in your super super technical search
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  #19  
Old 02-28-2013, 06:25 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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My goodness. Best of luck in your super super technical search
Is it so strange to want something that you like specifically? I know a lot of people, but I wouldn't pursue a relationship with just any one. They're all people, but each one is different and I like some of them more than others. That said, if you don't like to engage in gear talk, I understand :)
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Old 02-28-2013, 10:24 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

Check out Kumu Drums. I've been more than pleased with mine, and I've used them with many different heads and in many different tunings, styles and venues.
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  #21  
Old 02-28-2013, 11:15 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

Considering your quest - it would be difficult to try and see and hear all the different drums being made out there. However, I think the Chicago Drum Show is coming up soon (not sure of the date - but maybe April or May?). Perhaps you can travel there to see what people are offering. I saw alot of custom drums at the NAMM show and there doesn't seem to be a shortage of people who will make exactly whatever it is that you want. I do know the Hollywood Drum Show comes up in October, so maybe you could trek out for that one as well. With all the myriad different woods people can use, and finishes, you can easily fall into "paralysis by analysis" where you can't make a decision because everything is great.
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  #22  
Old 02-28-2013, 01:23 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

and then, if you find a place where you can check out a few high end kits, you will just have to play them in a cubicle or whatever with whatever heads are on them. Not much opportunity to tune them etc.. Hard to understand how anyone really could pick an ultra high end kit without hearing someone play them somewhere live. Seems like some kind of leap of faith would be required.

Where does one go to play a high end kit in a somewhat controlled environment? Seems like half the battle in choosing a kit to me...
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Old 02-28-2013, 02:23 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

By going what the op has mentioned about shell construction and bearing edges and different types of wood, I'm wondering if he has considered the Pearl Reference series. The different types of wood, different thickness and different bearing edges all in one kit. Just an idea. John
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Old 02-28-2013, 02:29 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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and then, if you find a place where you can check out a few high end kits, you will just have to play them in a cubicle or whatever with whatever heads are on them. Not much opportunity to tune them etc.. Hard to understand how anyone really could pick an ultra high end kit without hearing someone play them somewhere live. Seems like some kind of leap of faith would be required.

Where does one go to play a high end kit in a somewhat controlled environment? Seems like half the battle in choosing a kit to me...
Totally agree with this....
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Old 02-28-2013, 03:07 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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and then, if you find a place where you can check out a few high end kits, you will just have to play them in a cubicle or whatever with whatever heads are on them. Not much opportunity to tune them etc.. Hard to understand how anyone really could pick an ultra high end kit without hearing someone play them somewhere live. Seems like some kind of leap of faith would be required.

Where does one go to play a high end kit in a somewhat controlled environment? Seems like half the battle in choosing a kit to me...
Yes, that's a huge challenge, & one that's difficult to overcome. If you can find such instruments in a store, then great. At least you can try them out, although probably in less than ideal circumstances, & probably not with heads of your choice. Increasingly, finding a store that holds stock of such instruments, & especially a selection, is rare indeed.

It's an issue for manufacturers, & one we're wrestling with right now. We offer a "drums to you" service in the UK for players who are genuinely interested in proceeding subject to a final trial. That's fine, but it won't work for us internationally. We're also putting a lot of effort into producing totally honest video captures of our drums too. This idea goes somewhat against the norm of videos designed to make the drums sound as impressive as possible, but it gives our customers a good real world reference point, & we believe that has strong value.
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  #26  
Old 02-28-2013, 03:58 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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Yes, that's a huge challenge, & one that's difficult to overcome. If you can find such instruments in a store, then great. At least you can try them out, although probably in less than ideal circumstances, & probably not with heads of your choice. Increasingly, finding a store that holds stock of such instruments, & especially a selection, is rare indeed.

It's an issue for manufacturers, & one we're wrestling with right now. We offer a "drums to you" service in the UK for players who are genuinely interested in proceeding subject to a final trial. That's fine, but it won't work for us internationally. We're also putting a lot of effort into producing totally honest video captures of our drums too. This idea goes somewhat against the norm of videos designed to make the drums sound as impressive as possible, but it gives our customers a good real world reference point, & we believe that has strong value.
It is cool that you guys want to show the true sound of your drums in videos, rather than eq them until they sound as perfect as possible and work on the sounds to make it sound better than it really is. The cool thing about it is, if you run a business on honesty, you normally will get better customers and likely mere referrals from satisfied customers and repeat customers.

It is tough finding good opportunities to really see what a set is like. The best way to really learn about a set is to know someone who has that type of set and you can go play a set already tuned and know really what it sounds like rather than something just thrown together.
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Old 02-28-2013, 04:01 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

To clarify my statement on the order of shopping I used the word "features". This could mean type of shell, birch, maple, oak. It could be to buy a virgin bass drum or one with tom mount. The type of lugs, if a choice is available. Die cast hoops or not. There are so many things to look for that have an effect on the price and the sound of the drums that this in my opinion should fall right after the cost or budget. Hope that helps.
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Old 02-28-2013, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by SirRimshot View Post
After readin this string, and almost 50 years playing drums, and with every kit I was able to produce a sound that I like, as well as the listeners, I can only think of one word

Anal

My goodness. Best of luck in your super super technical search
Anal maybe but isn't it nice to have a choice. Smile
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Old 02-28-2013, 04:14 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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Originally Posted by john gerrard View Post
By going what the op has mentioned about shell construction and bearing edges and different types of wood, I'm wondering if he has considered the Pearl Reference series. The different types of wood, different thickness and different bearing edges all in one kit. Just an idea. John
I was going to suggest the same thing. I've owned some fairly nice kits, such as a DW Collectors, Ludwig Classic Maple, Austin-era Fibes, etc... and I gotta say the Pearl Reference I bought a few months ago is the nicest quality I've owned OR seen in person (my opinion.)

The modern designs that went into this kit are very cool and it's worth every penny. I highly suggest the OP at least consider a Pearl Reference.
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Old 03-01-2013, 12:56 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

Rally confused abiout what what I read so far. You want a high end drumset, but are looking at yamahas. I think I read that you are not impressed by the major makers, but are considering Yamaha? A list of upper end and custom makers has been listed, but no sense of enthusiasm with that either. At this point, for a high end drum set, that still packs innovation and yet has some traditional design, I would look at Noble and Cooley, Craviotto, and Brady. They have outstanding workmanship, very innovative, and a classical approach, but with cutting edge sound.
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Old 03-01-2013, 08:49 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

Really appreciate everyone's feedback and suggestions.Thank you Andy (Guru), for sharing some knowledge here!I guess Sonor, Yamaha and Tama are producing some great top end factory stuff, and above that the handbuilt custom guys like craviotto etc offer even more speciality, for added coin obviously!
There seems unhelpful comments too, but hey the world is a big place with lots of different agendas. I'm very particular about tuning ,sound, and playing ability, and want the highest quality and most consistent sound I can find. This is a part of the inspiration to create great music, after all!
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Old 03-02-2013, 01:18 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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Originally Posted by jaysticks View Post
Really appreciate everyone's feedback and suggestions.Thank you Andy (Guru), for sharing some knowledge here!I guess Sonor, Yamaha and Tama are producing some great top end factory stuff, and above that the handbuilt custom guys like craviotto etc offer even more speciality, for added coin obviously!
There seems unhelpful comments too, but hey the world is a big place with lots of different agendas. I'm very particular about tuning ,sound, and playing ability, and want the highest quality and most consistent sound I can find. This is a part of the inspiration to create great music, after all!
I have owned just about every flagship kit from the majors from Gretsch USA, Pearl Reference, Tama Starclassic, to Yamaha PHX etc. I have to agree with Andy that the German SONOR stuff is ahead of the pack in regards to sound and feel. The drums have a very pure quality to them and tune easier than any kit I have owned. Whether it's the slightly undersized shells, the bearing edge profile, or the way the plies are laid up, they sound amazing. The next best sounding kits I have owned were the Yamaha PHX and Yamaha Recording Custom. After acquiring my first German SONOR a few years ago I sold my PHX and have become quite the SONOR nerd. Of course others will disagree and you really need to compare for yourself but this has been my experience. Good luck and have fun testing the waters.
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Old 03-03-2013, 08:32 PM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

Interesting smatch, appreciate your feedback and experience with top end kit!Funnily enough the last three kits you mentioned are the ones I've been considering!Obviously the yamaha recording custom is a classic, and flagship kit for yamaha, has alot of history attached to it and is obviously comes with yamaha's brilliant hardware!
Also intrigued that you had the phx(which is very thick shelled, like the old sonors), and sold in favour of the sonor. Can you share more of your German sonor kit choices that have superseded the phx?I know they have the prolite (thin delite shell) and the customisable sq2 range, and I'm guessing your kit would be close to the phx in thickness, medium or heavy shell perhaps?Many thanks!
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Old 03-04-2013, 12:49 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

If you are leaning towards yAmaha and want a high end kit , can't go strong with the recording custom. Most likely the most recorded drums inthe world in all kinds of different genres.
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Old 03-04-2013, 02:47 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

As a fellow Saturn owner and after reading this thread I think that you will be pleased with a custom kit like a Guru or a Croviotto.
Either of these companies can build you a kit with the sound that you desire.
Stave shell construction is a whole different world from ply construction.
The shell works overtime in a stave shell drum to contribute to the tone that is produced.
That opens up a wide range of tuning and head possibilities.

The Saturn kits have a lot of low end articulation with moderate sustain. They don't like loose tuning.
They make a wonderful warm tone when they are tuned medium to tight.
That is why I like my Saturn kit. I like to tune on the tight side and still get a warm tone without much ring.
I also like round edge kits and vintage kits for that same reason.
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  #36  
Old 03-04-2013, 03:55 AM
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

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Originally Posted by jaysticks View Post
Interesting smatch, appreciate your feedback and experience with top end kit!Funnily enough the last three kits you mentioned are the ones I've been considering!Obviously the yamaha recording custom is a classic, and flagship kit for yamaha, has alot of history attached to it and is obviously comes with yamaha's brilliant hardware!
Also intrigued that you had the phx(which is very thick shelled, like the old sonors), and sold in favour of the sonor. Can you share more of your German sonor kit choices that have superseded the phx?I know they have the prolite (thin delite shell) and the customisable sq2 range, and I'm guessing your kit would be close to the phx in thickness, medium or heavy shell perhaps?Many thanks!
Sure thing Jay. I owned my PHX for a little over two years. Prior to that I played a Yamaha Maple Custom (original with the square gold lugs) for 10yrs. I loved my PHX and had several kits set up along side of it in my home practice space. Among those kits were a Gretsch New Classic, Yamaha BCAN, Gretsch Broadkaster, Tama BB, Pearl Reference, Precision Drum Co keller kit and some others I can't recall at the moment. All of those kits were very nice but when listening to them and playing them along side the PHX they just seemed anemic by comparison. The PHX was a very big sounding kit with probably the best sounding kick drum I have ever played. Well at some point I acquired a SONOR Maple light Designer (same shell as the medium maple SQ2) and the playing field was leveled. The SONOR held it's own with the PHX and I realized I actually preferred it's "pure" nature to the somewhat wild and bombastic nature of the PHX. I had played a Steve Smith signature SONOR kit in the past and said to myself then, that if there were any kit that I would even consider selling the PHX for, it was the heavy beech shelled Smith sig. Well after acquiring the Designer, which I was starting to prefer to the PHX and with the help of fellow member Artstar, I came to realize that a much larger SQ2 kit was within my budget if I sold the PHX. The PHX series are truly amazing drums but two things bothered me about mine. One, the prices for add on drums are astronomical and two, I didn't love the finish on my kit (got it as a demo kit for a great price). Oh and most importantly, that I had found a ply drum manufacturer that was building drums whose sound I preferred to the PHX. SONOR drums are just so clean sounding and again are such a breeze to get dialed in. So I sold the PHX and placed an order for a 6pc heavy beech SQ2 in a finish that I did love. My PHX was 10 12 16 22 and with it's sale I was able to order an 8 10 12 14 16 22 SQ2 in high gloss American Walnut. I have been playing the SQ2 since last July and feel zero regrets in my decision. The PHX series is my favorite Yamaha series and I have had extensive time with the RCs and every other top end Yamaha offerings. Although the PHX is indeed a very thick shell it has qualities like, low dynamic responsiveness and a wide tuning range that most might not associate with thicker shelled drums. The one thing it lacked vs my German SONOR kits however, was the refined purity that I experienced with the under sized SONOR shells. Annoying overtones are practically non existent (totally nonexistent with 5 minutes of tuning) and the tone doesn't suffer at all with these drums. I went with heavy beech due to my fondness of the Smith sig kit and the fact that the Maple light shells (or med maple SQ2) are not much thinner. My kit is perfect for me, very expressive at all dynamics, has the oomph to cut through louder mixes and is the easiest kit to tune, mic and track that I have ever owned. I love it so much that I ordered a 10x8 12x8 14x14 20x14 vintage beech SQ2 set to arrive this June. Of course not everyone will have the same opinion on SONOR but I am head over heels for them and think I have found the best sounding ply shelled kits in the world. Go play a few, maybe you will agree maybe you won't. Here is a pic of my heavy beech SQ2 to add a visual to my story. Good luck and have fun.

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Old 03-04-2013, 06:33 PM
jaysticks jaysticks is offline
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

The drum nerd in me is obviously fascinated by this reply, thank you smatch!After lots of experience with different kits, I came to the conclusion that the first two yammy kits I owned, which were the original maple custom as you mentioned, and the 9000 had the most character in terms of sound.Modern kits now all blur into one for me, with nothing to write home about!The only kit aside from the yamaha kits, that stands out was an old sonor delite kit I had, which wasn't acoustically loud, but as you say the tone was very pure!It also worked cohesively as a whole kit, and there didn't seem to be a weak drum in the set!
What intrigues me is you say the phx was nicer than your recording customs (a kit which I've reconsidered recently), and you say the maple designer light rivalled the phx, even tho the phx shell is thicker, and with possibly harder woods!I do now that phx has a 30 degree bearing edge, and the 9000 is rounder 45, so both kits will be more shell sound.
After your experience, how would you compare the sound of beechwood to maple, and is there a huge difference between medium and heavy sq2 shells?I'm presuming there is a raising of pitch in the heavy shell, and a reduction in overtone but with a stronger tone?I know beechwood is synonymous with old sonor kits like the phonic!
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  #38  
Old 03-04-2013, 06:47 PM
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keep it simple keep it simple is offline
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaysticks View Post
I do now that phx has a 30 degree bearing edge, and the 9000 is rounder 45, so both kits will be more shell sound.

I'm presuming there is a raising of pitch in the heavy shell, and a reduction in overtone but with a stronger tone?
Non of these elements in isolation equate to the affects you're describing. A more round bearing edge will only yield more shell sound if the shell construction is predisposed to do so & not encumbered by hardware. Shell thickness in itself will not clean up overtones, nor will it equate to a "stronger" tone.

The reason you recognise that most modern kits sound similar, is because they are similar.
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:02 PM
jaysticks jaysticks is offline
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

Well you're more of an expert than me Andy, I'm still trying to figure it out ha!Can you shed a light on why modern factory produced drums are characterless?I guess my mind was trying to isolate drums with character, and what made them different to generic sounding kits!
The bearing edge thing I always find confusing, although I find sharp 45 bearing edge drums to be more skin sound. I understand your concept in terms of the whole design working together, surely individual aspects will influence the sound?
A friend earlier told me that drum shells that are formed with tension into the shell, produce the purest sound, what is your opinion on that?
All the best to you mate J
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Old 03-05-2013, 01:11 AM
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bobdadruma bobdadruma is offline
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Default Re: Choosing a new top end kit

Have you watched John Good's Sermon On Wood?
http://youtu.be/2Eh5NPudAYs
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I kind of like old drums:)
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