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  #81  
Old 01-01-2014, 10:58 PM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

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Originally Posted by Aeolian View Post
Something I was told recently is that the Craviatto shells are not one piece as with the Vaughcraft or old steambent shells. They are two pieces. The inlay around the middle hides the seam between the top and bottom halves. This makes the drums more stable than if they were a single piece of wood.
Some are one piece, some are two pieces, depending on depth of shell. Nothing new about that, it's pretty much the way it's always been. There is no difference in stability between a single section or double section shell.

Whether one piece or two piece is a production decision based on availability of board and/or ability to bend wider boards.
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  #82  
Old 05-03-2014, 01:28 PM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

Simply add up the cost of buying the many kits you may have purchased over time. Chances are it would be the same as a set of Crav's. Though they may not be for everyone I will say that the most expensive snare I ever bought is the best frigg'n snare I've ever played. Go figure.
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  #83  
Old 05-03-2014, 03:38 PM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

This is an old thread...the OP was back in 2010 which makes me curious as to what choice was made in the end.

I think so many factors go into what kit you pick, the "brand" of kit being one factoe only.

First do you know you love drums and its going to be a long term interest..... graigslist / gumtree / ebay are chokkers full of kits that people bought and lost interest in after a short time. They got bored with the practice required, or the concept of playing a groove for long periods instead of a flashy series of fills. Not much point buying top end if you dont know if its a long term relationship or not. In the meantime you can buy some nice drums that tue nicely and stay in tune as well as having a nice sound ( I will get to that later) for a reaonable price ( Yamaha Stage Customs being an example)

Are you settled on a "gig" room in a house.....drums can sound so different in different rooms / houses. A lot of money buying a crav if it sounds like crap elsewhere, or at least the same as a middle of the road kit as the accoustics are shit.

Does the sound of the kit "inspire you" to play, tuning is an issue of course, but some people have better ears than ability and get frustrated by a poor sounding instument, as opposed to having an instrument one can "grow" into...thats often an arguement used here to buy decent cymbals rather than bronze tin lids.

Some people like changing drums often in the same way they change cars. They get bored and want something new...unless you have a shit-load of money I wouldnt buy Cravs...because it will be Gurus next, then Bradys etc...rather than Yammies, Gretsch< Tamas etc.

Have you played the kit you want to buy, does it suit your style...... even if the brand does suit you what about tom sizes (like Tama hyperdrive vs regular) , what woods do you like (birch, maple, bubinga exotic stuff)

My kit consists of bits and bobs that I have accumulated from cheap to expensive....from Yammie Gigmaker 12 and 16 toms to Stage Custom Kick (20) 8 and alternating 10 Tama supersta hyperdrive (the other alternating)10, and 14 floor toms and finally a Gigmaker 14 snare replaced by a Tama Artwood 6 ply maple (nice) to recently a Brady 12 by 7 (superb)

Might I say that the Brady is probably above my skills but I want to play it every monent of the day it is such an incredibly responsive and nuanced snare.....worth every "penny" for the joy and inspiration it gives me.

Anyway looking at the OP I would say all things considered if the Crav floats your boat and you can afford it then you would have bought it...but given you are asking for opinions I suspect you want us to affirm your choice ie you want them and can afford them buy em but you are a being a bit of a nervous nelly wanting affirmation !! In which case IMHO you are not ready yet !!

Its going to be your kit...so you choose it.....stuff everyone elses view
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  #84  
Old 05-03-2014, 09:18 PM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

All the right answers have been posted. I have found it somewhat amusing playing, both coasts over much of the past 38 years with some of the best players in the industry (guitarists, keys ...), as a fill-in drummer that I've met more people (non-pros) who have spent THOUSANDS of dollars to own the most expensive equipment. They never take them out of their basements or "studios". They never play live and no one ever sees the equipment. Most can't put together a pocket to stay in or three chords without buzzing - but they have more expensive equipment than the A-list pros they come to see. Most of the top drummers and guitarists in the world began their pro career with mid-line gear - if they were lucky. Factory entry level and mid-line hardware lasted for decades sometimes without a "need" to upgrade or spend more.

If you (the OP) wants a top drawer kit (build and sound) get the Ludwigs. They will hold up to pro touring, sound/play fantastic and even impress your friends when they say "Ah, Ludwigs. That's what Ringo played isn't it?" HOWEVER, it's your money and you will be the one looking at them every time you sit behind them. Like one of the earlier postings, I played Pearl Exports on stage and recording for decades along with my Ludwigs. No one could tell the difference. In fact, I love making entry/student instruments perform like $10,000 kits. Like Bo said, I too sound the same with every type of kit because I tune and prep them to sound the way I want them to sound.
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  #85  
Old 05-05-2014, 05:19 AM
ariomester ariomester is offline
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

My 2 cents.

Recently I started recording my drumkits here at home. I own 3 different kits with very different wood construction and drum sizes, but mounted clear heads such as Pinstripes or Evans G2 on both of them. The result? They sounded much closer than I've expecting. The reason? I guess the overall drum sound is somewhat the sound of drummer more than the drumkit, considering a regular drumkit as 80% of what are available on market today.

There are audible differences among different drumkits and these differences are important on many musical situations. But I disagree the marketing of many companies claiming that the sound of the drums are 100% the shell and 0% the drummer. I think the best sounding drums are that of the best drummer for that musical situation. My opinion.
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  #86  
Old 05-05-2014, 08:08 AM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

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Originally Posted by ariomester View Post
I disagree the marketing of many companies claiming that the sound of the drums are 100% the shell and 0% the drummer.
I'm not aware of any company who's expressed it that strongly, although there does tend to be an over emphasis placed on just about every aspect of drum construction. That said, it's legitimate for drum manufacturers to state the design basis & features of their instruments. They crave differentiation. With some, the differences are both obvious & useful in the right context. With others, the differences are mainly cosmetic or of doubtful advantage.

The vast majority of drums available are designed to appeal to the widest range of tastes. This is necessary to maintain their volume production model & that profoundly affects price. Essentially, once you're tied into large marketing budgets, the volumes need to follow, & that means emphasising every last detail to place yourself above the competition. That design direction inherently produces similar sounding instruments, & the production cost model dictates they're all made in a fairly similar way.

To experience real sonic differences, you need to look outside of the standard constructions, & try out instruments with a much more narrow/focussed design. Such instruments are designed to appeal to those seeking a certain sound palate, and are invariably much better at achieving that defined sound. In such instruments, constructional variation is far greater, & production costs are usually much higher too. Typically, lower production numbers, more labour intensive shell constructions, & sometimes even higher specification shell hardware costs drive the overall cost up, but that's the price of true specialisation. The sonic differences between such instruments & the general market stuff can be very significant indeed. Of course, whether the differences offer you a benefit or not, is down to personal context & circumstances.

Even in such specialised instruments, it's still all about the player. The instrument is merely a vehicle. It has no voice of it's own. Heads & tuning playing a huge part in the instrument's ability to reveal it's inherent characteristics, & a player able to dial into that unique voice to bring something truly special to the party.
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  #87  
Old 05-05-2014, 02:53 PM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

If the question is are Crav's worth the money I guess the notion is really the solid shell versus the ply shell. Taking Craviotto out of the equation for a second and listen to Ludwig, Slingerland and other models with solid shell construction. I do believe that these types of snare drums do have a superior voice of there own over ply snare drums, this could just be my perception or if not why are they so coveted? Marketing? I think not there are reasons these drums sound better, fatter, articulate and so on. Wood selection, age,craftsmanship , sure heads and tuning play a big part and sure each of us will tune and play drums the way we think they should be played therefor making any kit sound similar because that is the preference. If you value the notion of solid shell construction, wood selection, craftsmanship etc. Then these drums are worth the money. Especially if you take the time to really appreciate them. If not any kit will do I guess but are you gonna choose average cymbals to go with it? The notion of a drum kit being wasted if it's not being gigged every night is ludicrous, down in the basement or out in the garage is just as valid a place to kick the buckets as any other room with bad acoustics.
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  #88  
Old 08-11-2018, 03:11 PM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

Just wondering how many of these opinions have changed in this time, mine hasn't.
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  #89  
Old 08-11-2018, 03:20 PM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

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Originally Posted by Bo Eder View Post
This is very true. Lots of times vanity plays a big part in what we buy. However, as I said that it's a practical matter, it depends on what you do. I pretty much make every kit sound the same, regardless of cost and build. But if you are always gigging, the higher quality will always win out because you don't need things breaking down while out on the road. If you gig occasionally you can get away with a nice mid-level kit, or a used semi-pro kit. I've played cheap-o Kent drums circa 1969 and made them sound great. I paid $100 for the drums, and did a $1000 week-long gig with it.

But I don't want to argue that you should get something cheaper. If you really like the Cravs, then that's what you should get. What you buy has to be inspiring to you, or you won't play them as much (I now, it sounds shallow, but go with it for a moment). If the Cravs are inspiring, then get a set! It'll probably be the last set you ever buy. However, I don't believe that either!
Vanity is a huge factor. Iím almost positive an extreme majority if not all of us of us would fail a blind test of what brand drum was played.
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  #90  
Old 08-12-2018, 12:20 AM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

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Vanity is a huge factor. Iím almost positive an extreme majority if not all of us of us would fail a blind test of what brand drum was played.
you are the one with your photo on ...'s artist page so i guess you know a thing or 2 about it. the other thing is you don't need to be blind tested you can smell the glue. ha!
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  #91  
Old 08-12-2018, 01:03 AM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

Craviotto, like many others, has it's own sound.

It's not better or worse, simply taste, but just the complexity of the process, the materials and the fact that's it a smaller company inside the US are pretty big factors I'd think. They are a bit "overproced", but so are many other drums.

Not my personal brand of choice, but I'd still say that everyone should try out some of their snares. The basic maple, which really just tries to be a well made modern Radio King is fantastic. I know quite a few guys who have one

Their metal shells are also amazing, but that case it's worth noting that if you don't care about the Craviotto name, Adrian could probably do the same drum specially for you for quite a bit less.
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  #92  
Old 08-12-2018, 01:23 AM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

I have 5 other brands of kits and the Crav's are head and shoulders above and beyond the other kits and i should know , i play them all. I will say this ODD-ARNE i have a mahogany 18" bass drum and it is anything but a "foot tom" .
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  #93  
Old 08-12-2018, 02:02 AM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

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Originally Posted by paradiddle pete View Post
I have 5 other brands of kits and the Crav's are head and shoulders above and beyond the other kits and i should know , i play them all. I will say this ODD-ARNE i have a mahogany 18" bass drum and it is anything but a "foot tom" .
Iíve got a hollowed-log ash kit, and I agree, single-ply and hollow-log drums are something special.
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  #94  
Old 08-12-2018, 02:33 AM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

Certainly different, but if it was "the best" end of discussion, that's what everyone who could afford it would use and also what every studio would have in house and force everyone to use.

The are big differences in sound and today there are so many things to choose from on the top level.

Sound is subjective and not just with drums, but most other acoustic and electric instruments too, it's a certain character we're looking for.
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  #95  
Old 08-12-2018, 02:45 AM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

The question is not best, it's are they worth the money. My point is if one kit ( Crav ) is equal to or excels from at least 5 kits. do the math. it's up to you. like i said i play them all i'm not putting other kits down. i like them all. but as push pull said they ARE on another level.Man hollowed log ASH. that's pretty cool.
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  #96  
Old 08-12-2018, 03:38 AM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

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Originally Posted by paradiddle pete View Post
The question is not best, it's are they worth the money. My point is if one kit ( Crav ) is equal to or excels from at least 5 kits. do the math. it's up to you. like i said i play them all i'm not putting other kits down. i like them all. but as push pull said they ARE on another level.Man hollowed log ASH. that's pretty cool.
I get nice instruments because they inspire me to actually practice, and because Iím curious about the science of what makes them sound good.
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  #97  
Old 08-14-2018, 12:58 PM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

I'd recommend a steambent snare to anyone, had mine nearly 3 years now and haven't got bored with it at all. It's interesting how the shell changes sound as it ages or dries out. You get such a unique tone.

I built mine on the Tiki course, had Preston do the steambendy bit before hand, best extra £150 I've ever spent.

To get the most out of them you need round/rounder bearing edges, mine are round over so you get more out of the shell. Thinnest heads you dare use, I'm using a Diplomat Fiberskin Classic at the moment with a Hazy 200 snare side and this thing sings.
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  #98  
Old 08-14-2018, 06:48 PM
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Default Re: Craviotto Worth The Money?

Personally, I would take a Noble and Cooley SS over any Craviotto. I have owned both and I far prefer the N&C from a build and sound standpoint.
This is no slight of Craviotto but praise for Noble and Cooley.
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