DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > Drum Technique

Drum Technique Tips - Tricks - Practice - Rudiments - Educational DVDs & Books.....

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #41  
Old 06-25-2018, 05:55 AM
ineedaclutch's Avatar
ineedaclutch ineedaclutch is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: My living room
Posts: 1,416
Default Re: Check my logic and correct me if necessary.

Dibalo layed out a nice framework, and Jeff gave a good practical example of the two working together/against one and other. Still waiting to set those heads btw. I can't thank you enough. We've had heavy rain around here along with our normal 100+ temps and high humidity.
__________________
Get out there. Don't be a Richard.

Last edited by ineedaclutch; 06-25-2018 at 06:15 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 06-25-2018, 07:33 AM
toddbishop toddbishop is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,956
Default Re: Check my logic and correct me if necessary.

It makes mathematical sense, but it has nothing to do with how music is actually played. 125% of 4/4? I don't know what to do with that.

The fraction thing is really incidental to the system-- it doesn't matter. Like the rhythmic value names whole, half, quarter, mean "this note lasts a whole/half/quarter/etc of a measure of common time", but nobody actually thinks in fractional terms when reading and playing music. "Whoops, here's a measure of 5/4, gonna have to go 25% longer there"... it don't work that way.

Going back to the original question:

Quote:
I always had a hard time understanding the differences between say 7/8 and 7/4. Or 9/8 and 9/4. Or 3/8 and 3/4.
A time signature just tells you how much of what rhythm fits into one measure of music. 3/4 means one measure has room for three quarter notes, 7/8 means one measure has room for seven 8th notes, etc. So the difference between 7/8 and 7/4 is that the first one has room for seven 8th notes in a measure, and the second one has room for seven quarter notes. That's all. The rest of your question, about one being half or double time of the other is wrong-- you're over complicating it.

The way of understanding all of this is practical application. One good thing about band class is that you count your way through a lot of music, and you know right away what all the time signatures mean because you have a conductor waving a stick at you to show you what they mean. Not having access to that, get a snare drum book with some different meters in it and play through it-- like Mitchell Peters's Intermediate Snare Drum Studies or Louis Bellson's Odd Time Reading Text.

Last thing: Dibalo's answers are also misleading because: not only do time signatures tell you what fits in a measure, they also tell you how they are likely to be interpreted. If you think of 9/8 as "4/4 plus an 8th note" you'll have no idea what's going on. 9/8 is usually played as a triplet feel*** in 3, sometimes it's played as groups of two and three 8th notes adding up to 9 per measure, it's never played as 4/4 plus an 8th note. Same with 15/8-- it's usually a triplet feel in 5, not "two measures of 4/4 minus an 8th note." Sorry, but that's a totally useless description of what it is.


*** - Before any lurking pedants point out that 9/8 is a compound meter, and therefore the subdivisions are not triplets-- that is correct. Compound meter 8th notes are not triplets. But they do have a triplet feel, and, for players with practical experience but not much theory knowledge, triplet feel is an easier term to grasp than compound meter 8th notes.
__________________
Visit Cruise Ship Drummer! - a drumming blog | 2017 CSD! Book of the Blog now available

Last edited by toddbishop; 06-25-2018 at 03:05 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 06-25-2018, 09:21 AM
Sebenza Sebenza is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Antwerp, Belgium
Posts: 60
Default Re: Check my logic and correct me if necessary.

Quote:
Originally Posted by toddbishop View Post
Time signatures tell you what fits in a measure, they also tell you how they are likely to be interpreted. If you think of 9/8 as "4/4 plus an 8th note" you'll have no idea what's going on. 9/8 is usually played as a triplet feel*** in 3, sometimes it's played as groups of two and three 8th notes adding up to 9 per measure, it's never played as 4/4 plus an 8th note.
Years ago I had to learn how to play Blue Rondo A La Turk in a hurry for a gig I was hired to do, and that tune really demonstrates the two concepts you mentioned.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKNZqM0d-xo
Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2018, 05:35 PM
beyondbetrayal
This message has been deleted by beyondbetrayal. Reason: accident
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com