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  #41  
Old 06-20-2018, 11:31 PM
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Swiss Matthias Swiss Matthias is offline
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Default Re: At which point do polyrhythms stop sounding cool and start sounding academic?

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Originally Posted by SmoothOperator View Post
I find that polyrhythms that involve unisons are mostly academic sounding. Once I realized I could play 5 vs 4 without ever playing a note of unison, it really sort of opened the door to hearing how often polyrhythms crop up in nearly every genre.

I can hear the argument already, "bu bu but how is it a poly rhythm if you don't play more than one note at a time."

Well, you could write it out in 20/8 just like ye old 6/8 is a three vs two, but that doesn't mean it isn't easier to play as two separate rhythms.
But polyrhythms do resolve constantly, and even if you don't play one of the two
notes that are in unison, they still are there.

I don't think a 20/8 has anything to do with a 5 against 4 polyrhythm at all, naturally.
You can play 5 against 4 or 4 against 5 in any time signature I guess.
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  #42  
Old 06-21-2018, 01:43 AM
toddbishop toddbishop is offline
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Default Re: At which point do polyrhythms stop sounding cool and start sounding academic?

I don't use the things as licks, they're just forms of compound pulse that are running all the time, whether anyone is playing them or not. It's an African concept. If you're fluent with them you can draw on them at any time, which leads you to play different stuff than if you only know european march time. They also happen to be very natural as drumming coordination, so a lot of drumming is based on them. There's nothing academic about it.

I'm talking just 3:2/2:3 and 3:4/4:3. 2:3 is really the main one, and I've broken it down here, if anyone is interested.
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  #43  
Old 06-21-2018, 03:18 AM
SmoothOperator SmoothOperator is offline
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Default Re: At which point do polyrhythms stop sounding cool and start sounding academic?

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Originally Posted by Swiss Matthias View Post
But polyrhythms do resolve constantly, and even if you don't play one of the two
notes that are in unison, they still are there.

I don't think a 20/8 has anything to do with a 5 against 4 polyrhythm at all, naturally.
You can play 5 against 4 or 4 against 5 in any time signature I guess.
But if you play 5 against four starting on the and of two, you need at least a 40/8 signature.

I think practically what happens is people write it in straight time just adding grace notes here or there(or not), then the melody sort weaves in and out of the polyrhythm. Sometimes it sounds kinda cool.
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  #44  
Old 06-21-2018, 01:31 PM
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Swiss Matthias Swiss Matthias is offline
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Default Re: At which point do polyrhythms stop sounding cool and start sounding academic?

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Originally Posted by SmoothOperator View Post
But if you play 5 against four starting on the and of two, you need at least a 40/8 signature.

I think practically what happens is people write it in straight time just adding grace notes here or there(or not), then the melody sort weaves in and out of the polyrhythm. Sometimes it sounds kinda cool.
I believe you may confuse polyrhythms with odd groupings. In a polyrhythm, the
5 notes and the 4 notes start simultaneously and are evenly spaced in a certain
length, i.e. one quarter note (in this case the 5 note part would become 16th-note-
quintuplets, while the 4 note part would be straight 16th-notes.

When you change perspective, an odd-grouping becomes a polyrhythm, and vice
versa, but basically it's not the same thing.
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  #45  
Old 06-23-2018, 07:22 AM
12x7 12x7 is offline
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Default Re: At which point do polyrhythms stop sounding cool and start sounding academic?

Check out Meta by Car Bomb. Aside from it being a rhythmic tour de force, it has a fat quarter note you can clap to. Heavy grooves. Elliott Hoffman is the drummer. He good.
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  #46  
Old 06-28-2018, 11:04 PM
SmoothOperator SmoothOperator is offline
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Default Re: At which point do polyrhythms stop sounding cool and start sounding academic?

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Originally Posted by Swiss Matthias View Post
I believe you may confuse polyrhythms with odd groupings. In a polyrhythm, the
5 notes and the 4 notes start simultaneously and are evenly spaced in a certain
length, i.e. one quarter note (in this case the 5 note part would become 16th-note-
quintuplets, while the 4 note part would be straight 16th-notes.

When you change perspective, an odd-grouping becomes a polyrhythm, and vice
versa, but basically it's not the same thing.
But in the odd-grouping, there is a poly-rhythm. I mean you could right in ghost eighth notes I guess, the you would get a true poly rhythm with a unison on the and of one the straight quarters, sounds better with extra eighth notes though.
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