DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > Drummers

Drummers Topic Name = Drummer's Name. Use this forum to discuss the drummers profiled on DrummerWorld

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #6401  
Old 07-15-2015, 04:58 PM
szokematyi's Avatar
szokematyi szokematyi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Hungary, Debrecen
Posts: 88
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gavin Harrison View Post
Hi szokematyi

My signature snare drum has three air holes. One in a normal position and one directly above each snare bed. This is an already established Sonor method and I trust their engineers. I tried it and thought it sounded good to me.
Thank you for the fast reply. I've tried to find pictures about your snare's air vents before, but I only managed to find two. One in the "regular place", and one above one of the snare beds. Thought it was weird, not being the same on both sides. Are those "snare-bed-vents" smaller than the "usual"? I'd think they should be. But I could not find smaller threaded air vents anywhere. :(

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gavin Harrison View Post
I'm curious about them and will probably try them out soon. The only place I need them is on the 3 nearest bolts to me where I'm playing rim shots. The bottom head bolts don't move on my Sonor snare. I can also see that if they were tightened a bit too much they could potentially wreck the thread inside the lug. Proceed with caution !
Caution is always the right way to go! Thinking through every possible scenario is a very good, if sometimes annoying way to go about things, but still...
But I don't agree with you here. I would not use different methods within a single unit (meaning you wanting to use these special tuning rods ONLY on the 3 lugs closest to your rimshots). I'd be afraid that the different mechanical stress on the hoop would cause it to twist, or bend slightly over time. I'm a HUGE advocate of using the same tech within a single unit in almost every case. In this instance If I'd be in your shoes I'd use these bolts at every lug on the top head if I don't need to use them on the botton lugs. That is the safer approach I believe. But whatever you choose, please give us a shout how it went. I'm quite curious about these too.

Cheers,
Matyas
Reply With Quote
  #6402  
Old 07-21-2015, 01:30 AM
Mash Mash is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 2
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hey Gavin! I've found this mini-game on one website and I immediately thought of you. It's very simple and will take like 1 minute of your time. It plays a beat and you tap along to it. You can use your mouse or any keyboard key (keyboard is better imho). Soon the beat fades and you have to tap with the beat muted. You tap 20 times and each hit is scored from 0 to 50 giving a maximum score of 1000. My best so far is 931.

I find this game pretty addictive to be honest. I encourage all you drummers to post your results and I would be delighted (I think everyone here would be) if Master Gavin posted his.

Here's the link:
http://www.concerthotels.com/got-rhythm

Have fun guys :).
Reply With Quote
  #6403  
Old 07-21-2015, 05:40 AM
Kakariki Kakariki is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 3
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin,

I've been a big fan of yours since I first heard of Porcupine Tree about 9 years ago. Just really tasteful drumming. Love your stuff with 05ric as well. Managed to come to your drum clinic in Waterloo Ontario a few years ago, and a Porcupine Tree show in Toronto a year or so before that. People were screaming your name that night. Great stuff.

Anyway, I was hoping you could comment on a problem that I've noticed recently with my practicing. Earlier in this thread you mentioned a number of drum books that you found helpful or really liked working through (The New Breed and Syncopation particularly). I'm wondering how you find yourself working your way through the entirety of these books? For example, I have had The New Breed for several years now and have never made it past the first few pages. I just keep going back and trying to perfect the same exercises. How you approached these books back when you were still developing your chops?

Greatly appreciate the time you've taken to dish out all the advice and information you've shared in this thread. Makes for a good read!

- Steve
Reply With Quote
  #6404  
Old 07-23-2015, 08:12 PM
french_cat french_cat is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 3
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin,

I love the way you play the drums and you've been my favourite drummer as to sound as well as to technique and playing style since I first listened to In Absentia. Since then I bought almost everything you ever released as to drum gear and books.

NOW TO THE QUESTIONS :-)

I've recently started to update the heads on all my toms and my snare. I've watched ALL your tuning videos and gathered all your hints concerning the tuning method but I won't get a sound that fully satisfies me.

To pull the head down evenly etc. is reasonable for me and I did it just like you show it, also using Protean Keys. But I don't really know when to stop tuning tighter because I can't anticipate the outcome of the final sound as the bottom head is not on there yet, no dampening ring on etc.
Bob Gatzen e.g. is always tuning to a certain tone that he's singing while tuning. Maybe that would help. I've not changed many heads in my years of playing, maybe it's just the missing experience.
  • But after all, have you possibly got any tips for me?


  • I was also wondering which Head to put on (and tune) first, batter or reso head?
  • Also, some people say, for a dry and tight sound tune the reso head tighter than the batter one, others say the other way round, it's confusing. I don't even know how it affects the sound if the batter or reso head is tuned tighter. Maybe you could help me out here, too.
  • When you're practising and trying stuff at home, are you hearing the recorded version of your drums via headphones or are you just playing and hearing the pure sound of your kit (no microphone sound or similar)?


Thanks in advance for answering these confusing questions.
Have a good time!

Regards from Germany,
Max

Last edited by french_cat; 07-23-2015 at 09:13 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6405  
Old 07-30-2015, 04:43 AM
Drummerrobin Drummerrobin is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 37
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin,

Hope all's well! I have a question about getting a good tom sound in a studio mix. Like you, I use 5 toms with a lot of cymbals and a problem I keep running into is the sound of the cymbals (mostly the ride and aux hi-hat) bleeding into the tom mics. I find this is resulting in the ringing of the cymbals being panned to odd places (usually during fills) and is making it hard to get clear mix where the toms sing through. It probably doesn't help that the drums were recorded in a small room with sensitive mics along with me possibly hitting the cymbals a bit too hard at the time (I've since reduced the velocity I play cymbals). Nevertheless, I find it hard to believe that this can't at least be improved in the mixing stage. Have you run into this problem much before? If so, have you found any effective ways to deal with it while mixing? Any light you can shed on the issue would be hugely appreciated!

Cheers,
Robin
Reply With Quote
  #6406  
Old 07-30-2015, 09:34 PM
Otto Otto is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,548
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hey Drummerrobin,

Hope I'm not sticking my nose in where it isn't welcomed...

Consider equalization on the tom channels.

Dropping out the highs where the tom is not singing will help a lot in reducing the cymbal bleed over.
Reply With Quote
  #6407  
Old 08-02-2015, 04:52 PM
Gavin Harrison's Avatar
Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London
Posts: 1,257
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi szokematyi

I've tried to find pictures about your snare's air vents before, but I only managed to find two. One in the "regular place", and one above one of the snare beds. Thought it was weird, not being the same on both sides. Are those "snare-bed-vents" smaller than the "usual"? I'd think they should be. But I could not find smaller threaded air vents anywhere. :(

There are three air holes on the drum and as far as I can tell they are all the same size. You can see them here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=knLwAlpQf6w

Hi Mash

I've found this mini-game on one website and I immediately thought of you. It's very simple and will take like 1 minute of your time. It plays a beat and you tap along to it. You can use your mouse or any keyboard key (keyboard is better imho). Soon the beat fades and you have to tap with the beat muted. You tap 20 times and each hit is scored from 0 to 50 giving a maximum score of 1000. My best so far is 931.


http://www.concerthotels.com/got-rhythm

I'm always interested in anything that can improve my sense of time but I had some fundamental problems with this game. Firstly the method of input produced wildly varying results. Whether it was on my MacBook or the keyboard and mouse connected to my iMac. Secondly I didn't find it a particularly useful exercise. It would have been better if it just measured your accuracy to the click without it disappearing (but then we're back to the first problem again) especially when we're talking about millisecond increments as this game claims. There's is already an excellent Practise Pad that does this called the "BeatNik Rhythmic Analyzer" http://www.musiciansfriend.com/drums...thmic-analyzer and I've had it for years. Regarding the game: To measure millisecond accuracy to a click you can no longer hear is not useful to me. Keeping a steady beat is interesting and perhaps the game would have been better if it told you the tempo that you ended up on. Just in case you're curious here's my best attempt:
Name:  Best attempt.png
Views: 2804
Size:  63.6 KB

A recent eye opener for me was an App called LiveBPM that measures and gives you a graphic representation of tempo. I tried playing in some of my favourite songs that I knew had a great feel...and to my surprise they all shifted tempo (some of them quite a lot) so it made me realise that perfect metronomic time (and the frustrations you will encounter trying to get even close to it) is not the "Holy Grail" and isn't a guaranteed route to great groove.
So why did those songs feel so good? I believe that first of all it's the drummers own internal sync - they way that they make the downbeats and backbeats feel - the relationship between all their limbs and the way they line them up that make it so pleasing to the ear. Evenness and steadiness of tempo helps too - but the drummers with good groove have a consistency in the way they place their beats - so as long as they're listening and paying attention - their tempo doesn't move that much and so become noticeable to the listener. I've witnessed drummers who are internally 'out of sync' (like their bass drum hits are ahead of their hi hat) quite often gradually speed up too. Secondly how the drums and other instruments are sync'ing together can make the whole thing feel like a great groove.

Hi Kakariki

I was hoping you could comment on a problem that I've noticed recently with my practicing. Earlier in this thread you mentioned a number of drum books that you found helpful or really liked working through (The New Breed and Syncopation particularly). I'm wondering how you find yourself working your way through the entirety of these books? For example, I have had The New Breed for several years now and have never made it past the first few pages. I just keep going back and trying to perfect the same exercises. How you approached these books back when you were still developing your chops?


To be honest I don’t think I have ever completed a drum book from start to finish. I tend to look for interesting exercises that I think will help me. I lose a lot of interest if I can see the book is just endless permutations of the same thing. I have worked through exercises like that but I’m more interested in the tiny details of playing at least one of the exercises as good as I can possibly play them before finding another one. It really isn’t about how many drum books you can complete in your life. It’s better to play one bar perfectly than 100 bars badly if you know what I mean.

Hi french_cat

I've recently started to update the heads on all my toms and my snare. I've watched ALL your tuning videos and gathered all your hints concerning the tuning method but I won't get a sound that fully satisfies me. To pull the head down evenly etc. is reasonable for me and I did it just like you show it, also using Protean Keys. But I don't really know when to stop tuning tighter because I can't anticipate the outcome of the final sound as the bottom head is not on there yet, no dampening ring on etc.
Bob Gatzen e.g. is always tuning to a certain tone that he's singing while tuning. Maybe that would help. I've not changed many heads in my years of playing, maybe it's just the missing experience.
I was also wondering which Head to put on (and tune) first, batter or reso head?


I always tune the reso head first. I’ve been doing this a long time so a lot of it is instinctive. How far to tune? Well, start slack and play the drum and see what it sounds like. If you don’t like it gradually tune a little bit higher and keep checking it.

Also, some people say, for a dry and tight sound tune the reso head tighter than the batter one, others say the other way round, it's confusing. I don't even know how it affects the sound if the batter or reso head is tuned tighter. Maybe you could help me out here, too.

I tune the reso head a bit tighter than the top. How much is “a bit tighter”? Again you need to experiment by stopping and playing it all the way.

When you're practising and trying stuff at home, are you hearing the recorded version of your drums via headphones or are you just playing and hearing the pure sound of your kit (no microphone sound or similar)?

I’m nearly always hearing the mic’d sound. I play with “In Ear Monitors” 95% of the time so I’m aware of what the mic hears. It’s quite different to ‘real life’ natural hearing - but it’s very important because that’s how people are going to hear me. Whether it’s in a live concert or on a recording. It’s impossible to tell what my drums really sound like acoustically unless you were standing here in the room with them.


Hi Drummerrobin

I have a question about getting a good tom sound in a studio mix. Like you, I use 5 toms with a lot of cymbals and a problem I keep running into is the sound of the cymbals (mostly the ride and aux hi-hat) bleeding into the tom mics. I find this is resulting in the ringing of the cymbals being panned to odd places (usually during fills) and is making it hard to get clear mix where the toms sing through. It probably doesn't help that the drums were recorded in a small room with sensitive mics along with me possibly hitting the cymbals a bit too hard at the time (I've since reduced the velocity I play cymbals).

The proximity of the cymbals to the tom mics can make a big difference. I didn’t understand why your cymbals are "panned to odd places" are they panned differently to your toms? Maybe it’s the small room - or maybe you just need to hit the toms harder and the cymbals quieter? All the mics hear all the instruments of the drumset to some degree or other so you really need to ‘play’ your mix by adjusting your internal dynamic balance. The whole thing is a compromise. It's hard to rescue things in a mix that didn't sound right to start with. Best of luck with it.

cheers
Gavin
__________________
FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/drummergavinharrison

Last edited by Gavin Harrison; 08-02-2015 at 06:28 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6408  
Old 09-15-2015, 11:40 PM
richkenyon's Avatar
richkenyon richkenyon is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Cheshire
Posts: 480
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin,
I just wanted to share my thoughts with you & other drummers after seeing you play at the Lowry in Manchester on Saturday night with King Crimson. The overwhelming feeling I was left with was that the entire performance, both of you and the band, was a monumental achievement on so many levels. To perform such complex music at that level and to see how attentive and receptive the audience was, is such a positive musical statement, especially in this age. I must urge all drummers with an interest in Gavin's work to see King Crimson on this tour if at all possible.

I do have a few questions - firstly, how did you approach the arrangement of the drum parts across 3 drummers? As someone that has long seen the 2-drummers concept as a bit of a stunt (notwithstanding Murder Inc - where Martin Atkins & Big Paul Ferguson made it work to great effect), I was amazed at how clever the parts were assigned to the drummers. And it really worked!

My second question was an ongoing thought I had watching the concert: it looks mentally exhausting to play this music and the added complexity of the very specific drum arrangements across multiple drummers must add to this, surely?! How do you cope with that aspect of performance?

It's something I have found a challenge at times when I've had the opportunity to play slightly more complex gigs (I was in a Genesis tribute for a while for instance) and I'd be interested to hear if you've any insights you can share on this aspect of performing.

I recall well your concept of "the human CPU" that you shared at DrumCamp several years back, and I'm sure that's a part of the equation!

Thanks again for such an inspiring night of music!
__________________
http://www.richardkenyon.com
Reply With Quote
  #6409  
Old 09-19-2015, 01:49 AM
Lightbulb_Sun's Avatar
Lightbulb_Sun Lightbulb_Sun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 31
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hey Gavin, hope all is well. Just a quick question (that will probably test your memory). I noticed that the b-side from In Absentia, Chloroform is credited to being written by both Chris and Steven, yet there's no version of Chris playing on it. Do you recall if you replaced his drum part or was there even a drum part until you joined? I'm interested because it's a killer, moody piece.

Loving your stuff with King Crimson by the way.

Thanks for your time!
__________________
When I'm asleep the smoke fills me
I feel the heat
My illness leaves me
Reply With Quote
  #6410  
Old 09-19-2015, 11:08 PM
Gavin Harrison's Avatar
Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London
Posts: 1,257
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi richkenyon

how did you approach the arrangement of the drum parts across 3 drummers?


I can tell you that it took a lot of time and experimenting. The three of us would get together - discuss ideas and record them on 3 drumsets at my home studio. There were so many ways it could be approached. We agreed that we didn't want to play the unison thing and risk lots of flams between the bass drums and snare drums. Sometimes it was carefully planned with an approach like it was being played by one drummer with 6 arms and six legs. We have a massive sound palette across the drumsets including all the percussion and electronics. Some sections in some songs just suited one of the drummers style better. It was also cool to NOT play sometimes and just sit there listening.

My second question was an ongoing thought I had watching the concert: it looks mentally exhausting to play this music and the added complexity of the very specific drum arrangements across multiple drummers must add to this, surely?! How do you cope with that aspect of performance?

It is very tiring and in fact with that amount of brain activity I have problems sleeping. I don't think my mind has ever been so active as when we're playing some of the really hard pieces - and there's no charts on stage for us drummers so we have to remember everything. Plus, in the last song of the show I play an open ended improvised drum solo (I haven't done that kind of thing in a concert for over 30 years) so there's a lot of challenges to consider.

Hi Lightbulb_Sun

I noticed that the b-side from In Absentia, Chloroform is credited to being written by both Chris and Steven, yet there's no version of Chris playing on it. Do you recall if you replaced his drum part or was there even a drum part until you joined? I'm interested because it's a killer, moody piece.

yes that's correct. Chris and Steve made a demo of the piece and some months later I recorded it at the In Absentia sessions.

Cheers
Gavin
__________________
FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/drummergavinharrison
Reply With Quote
  #6411  
Old 09-21-2015, 01:08 PM
Bronze Bronze is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Israel
Posts: 1
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hello Gavin, a few questions:

1. When playing smaller 4-5 piece kits, do your feel more restricted with your abilities and creativity?

2. How do you set your overhead microphones to get a stereo image so balanced? (even your china cymbals sound nice and balanced with the rest of the kit)

3. I wonder what was the rationale behind making your signature sticks thick. The most comfortable sticks (in my opinion) that I ever played were the Mike Portnoy sticks; they are thin which gives them a light nippy feel that I personally really liked.

Thanks and good music to you!
Reply With Quote
  #6412  
Old 09-21-2015, 08:19 PM
Gavin Harrison's Avatar
Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London
Posts: 1,257
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Bronze

1. When playing smaller 4-5 piece kits, do your feel more restricted with your abilities and creativity?

I never really play 4-5 piece kits. If I want to deliberatly limit my options and play a 4 piece I would have it tuned up (jazz-style) and find it quite inspiring as it would be so different to my 'normal' set up.

2. How do you set your overhead microphones to get a stereo image so balanced? (even your china cymbals sound nice and balanced with the rest of the kit)

I have a pair of mics directly behind me (like an extended pair of ears) about a foot away from my head. I find I get a more even mix between the cymbals and the drums that way.

3. I wonder what was the rationale behind making your signature sticks thick.

I have big hands and tend to be in situations that require some power. That way I let the sticks do the work. If I get on stage with some 5a sticks I know they will hurt my hands if I'm going to be playing loud...plus they will probably break quite quickly.

cheers
Gavin
__________________
FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/drummergavinharrison
Reply With Quote
  #6413  
Old 09-24-2015, 12:07 AM
mainframe_wa mainframe_wa is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Belleve Wa
Posts: 37
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin,

I'm intrigued by your use of the BeatNik Rhythmic Analyzer. I would love to know what exercises have you found most beneficial with the BeatNik, as I've picked one up recently. Thanks

Chris
Reply With Quote
  #6414  
Old 10-04-2015, 12:55 AM
Lightbulb_Sun's Avatar
Lightbulb_Sun Lightbulb_Sun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 31
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hey Gavin, great to see you and Steven playing together again at the Music Hall! Hope you had a blast. How was it to be playing with him again?

I noticed that you played on Craig's kit. Did this have any effect on your playing or did you not notice much of a difference? I know it's always strange for me play on different kits.

Cheers!
__________________
When I'm asleep the smoke fills me
I feel the heat
My illness leaves me
Reply With Quote
  #6415  
Old 10-05-2015, 10:18 PM
drumstu drumstu is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Chandler, Az
Posts: 13
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

[quote=Gavin Harrison;1361182]Hi AMP01

I really love the sound you get from your bass drum. I know you use a pillow as part of the way you get your sound. Could you please post a picture of your pillow and the pillow inside of your bass drum?

Here's a photo I took a few years ago on my 17" deep bass drum and you can see the pillow lying length-wise (and it goes up to just under where the beater strikes the head). On my 15" bass drum I put the pillow side-ways. The pillow is the heaviest feather pillow I could find...the light weight synthetic ones just won't do. I also devised a light temporary wood cross bar (held in with velcro) to keep the pillow off the front head as I wanted it to ring (on this occasion). Otherwise I take the wood cross bar out and then the pillow mutes the front head too. At this time I had an Audix D6 mounted in the bass drum (and it sounded really good). At the moment I have a Shure Beta 91A and an AKG D12VR mounted in the bass drum (the AKG just above the Shure) and I think it sounds a bit better - plus I have more control with two separate mics.

Hi Gavin,
Would it be possible when you have the opportunity to take off your BD reso head to take a picture of your new configuration with the two mics you speak of here?
Reply With Quote
  #6416  
Old 10-09-2015, 01:24 AM
Gavin Harrison's Avatar
Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London
Posts: 1,257
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi mainframe_wa

I'm intrigued by your use of the BeatNik Rhythmic Analyzer. I would love to know what exercises have you found most beneficial with the BeatNik, as I've picked one up recently. Thanks


I've had one for quite a long time now. I haven't used it lately but one of the things I found interesting was setting a click of 16ths at 44bpm (which is quite an easy tempo/subdivision) in Expert mode and seeing what kind of percentage I could maintain. Interestingly enough I found my right hand was more accurate than my left.

Hi Lightbulb_Sun

great to see you and Steven playing together again at the Music Hall! Hope you had a blast. How was it to be playing with him again?

It felt quite surreal actually - but I really enjoyed it and it brought back good memories.

I noticed that you played on Craig's kit. Did this have any effect on your playing or did you not notice much of a difference?

There was no way I could have brought my kit just to 'guest' on two songs at the end of the show. It was extremely strange to play someone else's drumset (even though he has a similar configuration to mine). The drums and cymbals were in unfamiliar places to me. However in these situations nobody in the audience would have been interested to know what difficulties I might have been experiencing - so you just get on with it. I did use my own bass drum pedal and snare drum.

Hi drumstu

Would it be possible when you have the opportunity to take off your BD reso head to take a picture of your new configuration with the two mics you speak of here?


OK next time I take the front head off I'll try to remember to get a photo.

cheers
Gavin
__________________
FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/drummergavinharrison
Reply With Quote
  #6417  
Old 11-25-2015, 12:05 AM
ErwinvanAsperen's Avatar
ErwinvanAsperen ErwinvanAsperen is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Rotterdam, the Netherlands
Posts: 2
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Dear mr Harrison,

In a long search for finding nice snare drum sounds over the years I turned to smaller diameter snare drums. In fact, nowadays I never really like 14" snare drums because I somehow found like 80% of them sounding to harsh.

I noticed you play your signature 12" snare drum quite a lot as a main snare drum recently... What are your thoughts on the "standard" 14" diameter snare drums in comparison to the smaller diameter snare drums?

Most of the time I find the smaller diameters (especially mid, mid-low - low tuned) to have more low end, less attack, less ring, more focussed sound.

From a purely acoustic point of view I'd even go as far to say that 14" inch snare drums shouldnt be considered as the standard snare drum size.

Id really like to hear your thoughts on this matter.

Thanks in advance.

Sincerely,

Erwin van Asperen
Reply With Quote
  #6418  
Old 11-25-2015, 07:11 AM
dzarren dzarren is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 387
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hello there! I too was very inspired by your use of a 12" snare. I noticed years ago that you would use a much smaller drum, but have it tuned quite low. So that you could get a super fat sound with tons of body, but the smaller diameter of the drum would bring up the pitch of the drum to where a snare drum would "naturally" be. I had never really heard anyone else do this, and i sought to emulate that sound.

I couldn't afford your signature model, so i had to settle for a 12"x6" yamaha oak drum.

Anyway, i live in Vancouver, and i know you'll be here in a few days! I will be there at the Rufus Drum shop! You have been one of my greatest inspirations, to say the least, i hope to meet you there! Although i will have to miss a few school lectures..
Reply With Quote
  #6419  
Old 11-26-2015, 10:10 PM
Gavin Harrison's Avatar
Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London
Posts: 1,257
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi ErwinvanAsperen and dzarren

I noticed you play your signature 12" snare drum quite a lot as a main snare drum recently... What are your thoughts on the "standard" 14" diameter snare drums in comparison to the smaller diameter snare drums?

I too was very inspired by your use of a 12" snare. I noticed years ago that you would use a much smaller drum, but have it tuned quite low. So that you could get a super fat sound with tons of body, but the smaller diameter of the drum would bring up the pitch of the drum to where a snare drum would "naturally" be. I had never really heard anyone else do this, and i sought to emulate that sound.


I first started using a 12" snare as an occasional 'main' snare drum when I began with Sonor drums in 2001. I was lent a late '90s 12"x5" Designer in white (I play it on several YouTube clips such as The Modern Drummer Festival and PASIC clips from 2008). I really loved the punch and articulation of this drum. (Sonor released it for a while back in 2010 with my name on it as a very short run to coincide with their first Sonor Days festival). To make it "fat" I do EQ in a lot of low end and compress it too which adds to the punch. The only down side is that it's hard to play good side stick on a drum of such diameter. When I was invited to design my own signature series snare drum I naturally thought of a 14x5 and a 12x5 as I use both a lot. There really is a big difference between those drums. I have played many snare drums in my lifetime and my ear is always drawn towards the 5" depth drums. I like a fat tone but I also want clean articulation.
I play the 12x5 with King Crimson because I wanted a snare sound that was not competing with the other two drummers snare drums.

cheers
Gavin
__________________
FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/drummergavinharrison
Reply With Quote
  #6420  
Old 11-27-2015, 09:52 PM
Bradley Cooper's Avatar
Bradley Cooper Bradley Cooper is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 19
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin,

I got my Ascent today and am unsure of the tuning of the toms. 10, 12, 14 (I'll accept the impossible-to-reduce sustain on the 14).
I'm terribly sorry if you've answered a similar question before, but I'd like to know if you tune your reso higher than the batter or vice versa. I have all your DVDs (bought ;) ) and like the sustain I hear from the drums still ringing when you talk (i.e., not the produced sound for the playing demos).
I have suede emperors on the toms. Will fork out the cash for vintage if you advise that it's worth it.

Thank you so much for your time.
Ps, God I'm liking my 14" protean and your sticks are perfect for me.
Reply With Quote
  #6421  
Old 11-27-2015, 10:02 PM
Bradley Cooper's Avatar
Bradley Cooper Bradley Cooper is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 19
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin,

I got my Ascent today and am unsure of the tuning of the toms. 10, 12, 14 (I'll accept the impossible-to-reduce sustain on the 14).
I'm terribly sorry if you've answered a similar question before, but I'd like to know if you tune your reso higher than the batter or vice versa. I have all your DVDs (bought ;) ) and like the sustain I hear from the drums still ringing when you talk (i.e., not the produced sound for the playing demos).
I have suede emperors on the toms. Will fork out the cash for vintage if you advise that it's worth it.

Oh, and are your SQ2 toms maple?

Thank you so much for your time.
Ps, God I'm liking my 14" protean and your sticks are perfect for me.
Reply With Quote
  #6422  
Old 11-28-2015, 12:08 AM
Lightbulb_Sun's Avatar
Lightbulb_Sun Lightbulb_Sun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 31
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hey Gavin, hope all is well.

Quick couple questions. If you were recording on a small kit and could only use two mics (an overhead and a kick), what would you pick? Do you have any preferences?

Also, think back quite a few years to when you recorded In Absentia. I've always been interested, how much involvement did you have on the writing side of things? Did you just play whatever Steven or Chris had demoed with your own flair or did you make up your own parts? I know you had much more input on Deadwing, but how much did your involvement affect In Absentia?

Cheers,

LS
__________________
When I'm asleep the smoke fills me
I feel the heat
My illness leaves me
Reply With Quote
  #6423  
Old 11-30-2015, 09:56 PM
Gavin Harrison's Avatar
Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London
Posts: 1,257
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Bradley Cooper

I got my Ascent today and am unsure of the tuning of the toms. 10, 12, 14 (I'll accept the impossible-to-reduce sustain on the 14).
I'm terribly sorry if you've answered a similar question before, but I'd like to know if you tune your reso higher than the batter or vice versa.
I have suede emperors on the toms. Will fork out the cash for vintage if you advise that it's worth it. Oh, and are your SQ2 toms maple?


Yes I tune the reso heads (clear Ambassadors) a bit higher than the batter head. I haven't tried the suede Emperors but if they sound good to you - stick with them. My SQ2 toms are all maple.

Hi Lightbulb_Sun

If you were recording on a small kit and could only use two mics (an overhead and a kick), what would you pick? Do you have any preferences?

That's a tough question. If it was a good sounding kit in a nice room then even a Shure SM57 should sound good as an overhead. Audix D6 usually sounds pretty good in any bass drum. I have other bass drum mic combinations that I like but - if it was just one bass drum mic and it was for something quick and easy then the Audix is good.

Also, think back quite a few years to when you recorded In Absentia. I've always been interested, how much involvement did you have on the writing side of things?

The songs were already written when I got to the In Absentia sessions in NYC. However I changed or developed whatever I felt was necassary - as I would on any recording if I can improve or think of (what I might feel is) a better part.

cheers
Gavin
__________________
FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/drummergavinharrison
Reply With Quote
  #6424  
Old 12-01-2015, 02:20 AM
Drummerrobin Drummerrobin is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 37
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin, hope you're doing well! I'm in the middle of making some setup adjustments and was wondering if you would be able to shed some light on a couple of things gear related.

I noticed you've always favoured the old Z Custom 18" China which is a sound I really like - where the attack isn't too harsh sounding, yet still bright and the cymbal has a reasonable amount of decay. Out of the cymbals Zildjian has on offer today, which would you say is the closest to that sound?

And have you ever used coated Ambassadors or Diplomats as the resonant heads for toms? If so what did you think of them?

All the best,
Robin
Reply With Quote
  #6425  
Old 12-04-2015, 03:27 AM
tradgrip tradgrip is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 18
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin,

I was curious if you and Steven have had any recent (or semi-recent) discussions about doing any future work together in a musical situation that was outside of PT or even his solo-career work? Knowing that you're in the middle of working with KC and his schedule seems quite active it wouldn't be occurring any time soon but was just curious.

Thanks and take care,
mc
Reply With Quote
  #6426  
Old 12-05-2015, 01:22 AM
Gavin Harrison's Avatar
Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London
Posts: 1,257
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Drummerrobin

I noticed you've always favoured the old Z Custom 18" China which is a sound I really like - where the attack isn't too harsh sounding, yet still bright and the cymbal has a reasonable amount of decay. Out of the cymbals Zildjian has on offer today, which would you say is the closest to that sound?

Yes the ones that I have are from an old series - but it would appear that there's a new version of it http://zildjian.com/Products/Drumset...Planet-Z-China I haven't tried it yet - but the profile and bell shape looks the same to me. Lately I've been using the 22" Swish Knocker - and that's a great cymbal too - but I wouldn't really do "heavy hitting" on it. I think the 18" Z is better suited for that.

And have you ever used coated Ambassadors or Diplomats as the resonant heads for toms? If so what did you think of them?

I have tried both - and I liked the coated Ambassadors on the reso side - it seemed to make the drums a bit softer/warmer in tone.

Hi tradgrip

I was curious if you and Steven have had any recent (or semi-recent) discussions about doing any future work together in a musical situation that was outside of PT or even his solo-career work? Knowing that you're in the middle of working with KC and his schedule seems quite active it wouldn't be occurring any time soon but was just curious.

no plans at the moment. I'm in touch with Steve - and had the pleasure of guesting on his last show at Royal Albert Hall in London a few weeks ago. I came on stage right at the end and played Lazarus and The Sound Of Muzak. It brought back good memories.

cheers
Gavin
__________________
FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/drummergavinharrison
Reply With Quote
  #6427  
Old 12-08-2015, 10:16 AM
Nige86 Nige86 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 14
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hey Gavin,

Very quick and simple question, is there anything happening with you and O5ric of late? I know you have been very busy with Zildjian days and KC but thought I would enquire.

Thanks

Nigel
Reply With Quote
  #6428  
Old 12-10-2015, 12:03 AM
Lightbulb_Sun's Avatar
Lightbulb_Sun Lightbulb_Sun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 31
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hey Gavin,

Hope all is well. Thanks for the advice regarding mics. Have you had experience with The Shure Beta 52a?

Also, a bit of a fun question. I know that you were never really into the progressive rock scene, but do you have a favourite PT album? Do you have an album that you genuinely enjoy listening to? It doesn't have to be one you that were featured on.

Cheers,

LS

PS: Is Steven planning on reissuing Deadwing on vinyl any time soon? Crazy expensive now.
__________________
When I'm asleep the smoke fills me
I feel the heat
My illness leaves me
Reply With Quote
  #6429  
Old 12-11-2015, 04:33 AM
Gavin Harrison's Avatar
Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London
Posts: 1,257
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Nige86

Very quick and simple question, is there anything happening with you and O5ric of late? I know you have been very busy with Zildjian days and KC but thought I would enquire.

Nothing planned at the moment but who knows what might happen in the future !

Hi Lightbulb_Sun

Hope all is well. Thanks for the advice regarding mics. Have you had experience with The Shure Beta 52a?

Yes I have a Shure Beta 52 but I have had little luck getting a sound that I liked from it. Simon Phillips uses them and his bass drums sound great - so it's more to do with the kind of drum sound that I'm going for.

Also, a bit of a fun question. I know that you were never really into the progressive rock scene, but do you have a favourite PT album? Do you have an album that you genuinely enjoy listening to? It doesn't have to be one you that were featured on.

I tend not to listen to albums that I played on - but when I hear some of the PT albums just by chance - I think they sound really good. I remember liking a lot of Deadwing and Nil Recurring.

cheers
Gavin
__________________
FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/drummergavinharrison
Reply With Quote
  #6430  
Old 12-18-2015, 06:09 AM
willregnier's Avatar
willregnier willregnier is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Montreal (Canada, QC)
Posts: 23
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin,

First, I wanna say thank for your time and patience for answering our questions! It's really appreciated.
I have 3 questions:

1) How do you manage phase alignement when you record your drum tracks? I'm talking about alignement, not just phase switching. Do you align manually your tracks after recording? Or do you use any "phase auto-alignment" plugin? Or do you just let the tracks as they are and make sure that the mic placement is ideal?

2) I know you use the reverbs from Space Designer in Logic (well, maybe not anymore but it doesn't mather) and that you send your tracks to an Aux reverb. Most of the time, people are EQing reverbs - so that they sound more like a room - by cutting the lowest and highest frequencies so it looks like an inverted U shaped EQ. How do you treat your reverb EQ and by much are you cutting?

3) I'm studying right now at the University of Montreal (Québec, Canada) with drummer Paul Brochu. He is best known for his work with jazz fusion band UZEB (1976-1992). Really nice guy and very inspiring drummer/teacher! I was wondering if you ever heard of him?

Thanks a lot and take care!

Will

Last edited by willregnier; 12-19-2015 at 10:20 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6431  
Old 12-20-2015, 03:14 AM
Gavin Harrison's Avatar
Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London
Posts: 1,257
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi willregnier

1) How do you manage phase alignement when you record your drum tracks? I'm talking about alignement, not just phase switching. Do you align manually your tracks after recording? Or do you use any "phase auto-alignment" plugin? Or do you just let the tracks as they are and make sure that the mic placement is ideal?

I have tried manually moving overhead and live room track around to line up with the snare drum - but it seems to suck the 'air' out of the recording. IF I want a really big ambient drum sound (and I'm going to use the live room mics as the leading edge) then I might pull those live room tracks back - not for any phase reason - just to combat the delay. My live room mics are about 7 metres away (and there's 3 milliseconds in a metre) so they are 21ms late to how I played them. That's enough to really not feel good in a track unless the close mics are quite audible. If my drum mix is using the close mics and I just want some ambience from the live room I leave them where they are. I have never tried the "auto-alignment" plugin.

2) I know you use the reverbs from Space Designer in Logic (well, maybe not anymore but it doesn't mather) and that you send your tracks to an Aux reverb. Most of the time, people are EQing reverbs - so that they sound more like a room - by cutting the lowest and highest frequencies so it looks like an inverted U shaped EQ. How do you treat your reverb EQ and by much are you cutting?

I don't eq the reverb.

3) I'm studying right now at the University of Montreal (Québec, Canada) with drummer Paul Brochu. He is best known for his work with jazz fusion band UZEB (1976-1992). Really nice guy and very inspiring drummer/teacher! I was wondering if you ever heard of him?


Yes Paul is a great drummer - I really liked UZEB - I have one of their records in my collection.

cheers
Gavin
__________________
FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/drummergavinharrison
Reply With Quote
  #6432  
Old 12-21-2015, 06:19 PM
Lightbulb_Sun's Avatar
Lightbulb_Sun Lightbulb_Sun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 31
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hey Gavin! Hope all is well.

I came across these pictures and I thought they were pretty hilarious. What's the story behind them?





Secondly, I've noticed that whenever the track Dark Matter is played live, you leave out the hihat splashing that was in Chris' version (I've included a picture of the original below). Is this because of the limitations in trying to imitate that "jangly" sort of effect going on in the studio version? I notice that you still sort of "bounce" the hats to try to create a bit of an effect. Also, in the last section of the track, you play a bell pattern with your chimes (lovely touch, by the way), with the kick on 1 and 2 instead of 1+. Was there a deliberate reason to this?



We're grateful you've taken the time to time to answer everybody's questions here!

Cheers,

Lightbulb Sun
__________________
When I'm asleep the smoke fills me
I feel the heat
My illness leaves me

Last edited by Lightbulb_Sun; 12-22-2015 at 04:33 AM. Reason: Picture resizing.
Reply With Quote
  #6433  
Old 12-24-2015, 06:19 AM
Puneet Puneet is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 1
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hey Gavin,

First off I want to thank you for everything you have done and are continuing to do for drummers and musicians in general. I have been greatly inspired by your playing, philosophy of playing, and overall insight in many different ways.

I have always wanted to ask you a bit about how you plan out your practice sessions. You mention in an interview that you once realized that you had no ideas when you sat on the kit because you spent hours only exercising your hands on a practice pad (I think this was when you were playing a show in Zurich several years back), you started practicing with a more musical approach rather than a technical one. I completely understand this but I find that many times I need improved mechanics to be able to execute some ideas that I have. Thus I spend considerable time actually working on the mechanics of my playing but I am struggling with the right balance. When I see you play, I not only see great ideas but also sound technique. Do you also work on this regularly?

How do you suggest I go about this so that I am always working on new musical ideas but at the same time developing the technique (Speed, motion, control etc) to execute them and build on them?

Thanks for everything and more!

Cheers,
Puneet
Reply With Quote
  #6434  
Old 12-28-2015, 11:39 PM
albywelch albywelch is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 2
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hey Gavin! I just firstly would like to say that I am a HUGE porcupine tree fan and love your drumming so much.

I would like to ask you if you had any final tips on developing really good time??

I have read all 160 pages of this thread and written down everything that you've said in regards to developing timing and feel and have recently started practising them, but are there any other exercises that you have done that really benefited you etc?

My main problem is dragging unintentionally when in band rehearsal and playing live....my band mates will tell me "stop dragging, play faster faster..." and it really gets me down (because I've been trying to be bang on with the click in the practice room and recording myself/filiming myself etc, and I can tell the areas in which I drag and am slowly trying to iron out them out), but I just fall apart it seems when playing with my bands. They will tell me to stop dragging in a certain part and so what I am doing is almost consciously speeding myself up in that part to compensate my 'drag', which to me is making me feel unconfident about my drumming and time and just leaves me with no idea of when my playing feels good etc.

any tips gavin?

cheers so much,
allan welch
Reply With Quote
  #6435  
Old 12-29-2015, 02:28 PM
Gavin Harrison's Avatar
Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London
Posts: 1,257
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Lightbulb_Sun

I came across these pictures and I thought they were pretty hilarious. What's the story behind them?

There comes a time every year or two where you need to have promo shots made. A lot of publications ask for photos to go with an interview (small magazines and websites almost never have a budget and expect you to provide shots for free). So back in my days of playing Pearl drums - I had an idea for a photo shoot that was not the 'usual drummer' type of photo. Here's one from a few years ago I did with my first Sonor set with photographer James Cumpsty.
Name:  Gav235-3587_IMG.JPG
Views: 1068
Size:  32.1 KB

Secondly, I've noticed that whenever the track Dark Matter is played live, you leave out the hihat splashing that was in Chris' version. Is this because of the limitations in trying to imitate that "jangly" sort of effect going on in the studio version? I notice that you still sort of "bounce" the hats to try to create a bit of an effect. Also, in the last section of the track, you play a bell pattern with your chimes (lovely touch, by the way), with the kick on 1 and 2 instead of 1+. Was there a deliberate reason to this?

When I played the older songs of PT (that Chris originally played on) I developed my own version (based off his original idea). As the tours went on parts changed and mutated and became 'something else' which I was more comfortable with. For instance the end section of Hatesong slowly turned into 'something else' which just kind of happened organically over many shows. The play out of Dark Matter just happened one night and Colin followed my change of bass drum pattern. We liked it and so it kind of stuck.

Hi Puneet

I have always wanted to ask you a bit about how you plan out your practice sessions. You mention in an interview that you once realized that you had no ideas when you sat on the kit because you spent hours only exercising your hands on a practice pad, you started practicing with a more musical approach rather than a technical one. I completely understand this but I find that many times I need improved mechanics to be able to execute some ideas that I have. Thus I spend considerable time actually working on the mechanics of my playing but I am struggling with the right balance. When I see you play, I not only see great ideas but also sound technique. Do you also work on this regularly? How do you suggest I go about this so that I am always working on new musical ideas but at the same time developing the technique (Speed, motion, control etc) to execute them and build on them?

I spent many thousands of hours working on my technique and to some degree still do. It's more about control than speed though. It depends what you hear in your head as 'the best drum part for the song' - if that includes 64th note double bass drum rolls - then you're going to need a lot of practise to get to that point. When I listen to a brand new song that I'm asked to play on - I just listen to the song (without any guide or programmed drums) and just try to imagine what I'd like to hear on it. Where the back-beats are going to land and what drum and cymbal sounds I'd like on this song. Sometimes the sounds are inspiring to me and might make me play something that I think is interesting. HOWEVER - your personality will dictate what you think is 'interesting and suitable' - and that might be vastly different to the next person - and the band or producer may (or may not) agree with you.

As I get older I tend to hear 'the drum part that I think would best suit the song' as something more technically simple - but that's not to say that it still might be difficult to play because of the amount of control required. Playing other instruments and trying to write songs have helped me think more 'musically' and less like a typical drummer. Finding creative solutions to songs is something very interesting to me and I try to think 'outside of the box' as much as I can.

Hi albywelch

I have read all 160 pages of this thread and written down everything that you've said in regards to developing timing and feel and have recently started practising them, but are there any other exercises that you have done that really benefited you etc?

Yes - all of them. Anything I can do that might help my sense of time has been worthwhile. Nobody has perfect time - it's all a 'work in progress'.

My main problem is dragging unintentionally when in band rehearsal and playing live....my band mates will tell me "stop dragging, play faster faster..." and it really gets me down (because I've been trying to be bang on with the click in the practice room and recording myself/filiming myself etc, and I can tell the areas in which I drag and am slowly trying to iron out them out), but I just fall apart it seems when playing with my bands. They will tell me to stop dragging in a certain part and so what I am doing is almost consciously speeding myself up in that part to compensate my 'drag', which to me is making me feel unconfident about my drumming and time and just leaves me with no idea of when my playing feels good etc.

Having a good sense of time is about having a good sense of listening (and a certain type of listening is required). If you can't hear it whilst you're doing it - then it will never get better. Listening back to recordings the next day and noticing things aren't right is just the first step. Ultimately you need to recognise it AS YOU ARE ACTUALLY PLAYING IT.
You need to be able to hear when the time starts to move and grab hold of it and correct it as soon as possible. With very good drummers - that might take a few milliseconds. With inexperienced drummers - that might take the whole song (or on listening back the next day) until you realise that the tempo is significantly different to where it started. Typically some drummers start off on a fill and speed up - they don't know they've speed up until the end of the fill when they arrive at the downbeat too early. Experienced listeners will be able to notice that they sped up within the first two or three 16th notes - and therefore catch it early and rescue the fill.
It's like you're riding a bicycle down a white line. From a distance, great drummers can appear to ride that bike in an absolute straight line. Under much closer zoom conditions you might notice that they are wavering tiny amounts - but as soon as they go slightly left or right of the line they catch it and correct it. The corrections are so small that a lesser experienced listener might believe that they never move. Not-so-great-drummers will wait until they have really parted company with the line before they try to correct - and the swerving left to right will be large and noticeable to almost everyone - maybe they are too preoccupied with the mechanics of riding the bike in the first place that they are not so balanced and cannot notice how far they have drifted? Let's say that I have been riding 'the bike' a lot of years and it's so second nature to me that I don't even have to think about riding it. Therefore I can look up at the line in front of me and comfortably stay within a very small 'window of acceptability' (WOA). As you get better and progress though your years of practise and experience your WOA gets smaller and tighter (but note that it will never be perfect).
If you think your time is wavering in certain songs or certain passages of a song then simplify what you are playing so you get some spare room in your head to listen and focus more on the timing and less on the mechanics.

Cheers
Gavin
__________________
FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/drummergavinharrison
Reply With Quote
  #6436  
Old 12-29-2015, 03:53 PM
Duck Tape's Avatar
Duck Tape Duck Tape is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Sydney
Posts: 4,484
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin, just reading your response to that last question - and I want to ask you about my tendency to swing and play behind the beat.

You chose me as a winner in the "gavin groove" competition, I also uploaded that little clip to my youtube channel, here is a reminder if you have a minute to look (no worries if you don't have time).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YoX7_iJWELE

Firstly I was really honoured that you chose me and I love the big band album that was sent to me. Thank you! Hopefully you make it out to Australia one day.

Listening to myself playing to a porcupine tree song was eye opening because compared to you I've got this dirty funk sound that sounds inappropriate... it prompted me to want to "straighten up" my feel and play more on the beat (and I'm always trying to be more accurate).

I do a bit of a metronome practice, I think my timing is fairly consistent and I have done a little work on developing the ability to shift from playing ahead, to on, to behind the click (I'm not much good at that yet). I think my swinginess is more about the relationship between the notes I play on the kick, hat and snare. Even when I play a single stroke roll on my hands or feet I can feel and hear a swing. You sound very straight and neat and accurate and it's just a wonderful feel. I don't want to be your clone but I would like to be able to sound more like you when I want to.

Like you said, being aware of your "problem" and listening and correcting seems to gradually have an effect, but I'm wondering if you have any ideas.

Thank you in advance.
__________________
Watch a purdie shuffle here!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFPmH1wrSiQ
Reply With Quote
  #6437  
Old 12-31-2015, 06:58 AM
albywelch albywelch is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 2
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

thankyou so much for your response gavin! it means so much to me, as you are one of my drumming idols.

I totally agree with your response. I have alot of practice to do now and more importantly, a lot of listening to do. thanks again gavin.
Reply With Quote
  #6438  
Old 01-03-2016, 01:04 AM
Stevesmithfan's Avatar
Stevesmithfan Stevesmithfan is offline
Pioneer Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 327
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Gavin. I saw an interview with you recently on YouTube. You said over the years cymbals and snare drum sounds (high frequency) have caused your ears to ring, especially in quiet rooms. Does this affect your ability to sleep? How do you sleep with this issue?
Thanks,
Greg
Reply With Quote
  #6439  
Old 01-03-2016, 04:23 PM
Gavin Harrison's Avatar
Gavin Harrison Gavin Harrison is offline
DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: London
Posts: 1,257
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

Hi Duck Tape

Listening to myself playing to a porcupine tree song was eye opening because compared to you I've got this dirty funk sound that sounds inappropriate... it prompted me to want to "straighten up" my feel and play more on the beat (and I'm always trying to be more accurate). I think my swinginess is more about the relationship between the notes I play on the kick, hat and snare. Even when I play a single stroke roll on my hands or feet I can feel and hear a swing. You sound very straight and neat and accurate and it's just a wonderful feel. I don't want to be your clone but I would like to be able to sound more like you when I want to.

What happens when you play both of your hands together (in perfect unison) on a practise pad? Can you hear a flam? It might show you that your left hand is lagging behind your right in a way that would make single stroke 16ths sound a bit swingy. I can tell you that when I used to play that song in PT I would play it with 16ths on the hi hat with my right hand.

Hi Stevesmithfan

I saw an interview with you recently on YouTube. You said over the years cymbals and snare drum sounds (high frequency) have caused your ears to ring, especially in quiet rooms. Does this affect your ability to sleep? How do you sleep with this issue?


It is a constant problem. I can hear the high pitched ringing ALL the time. I try not to focus on it too much as it can drive you crazy. I usually sleep with the sound of rain coming from an app (called White Noise) on my iPhone. That tends to cover the ringing a bit and have me concentrate on a different sound.

cheers
Gavin
__________________
FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/drummergavinharrison
Reply With Quote
  #6440  
Old 01-04-2016, 12:48 PM
Duck Tape's Avatar
Duck Tape Duck Tape is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Sydney
Posts: 4,484
Default Re: Gavin Harrison here!

I tried the unison thing on the snare drum tonight, I haven't used a pad in a long time. I was often able to make them hit perfectly together (and "zoing" off in different directions). I have noticed you advocate practising this but I can't remember if it was on your dvd or a youtube interview, I will have to go back and watch. Do you think practising these unison singles will help me? If so what should I do? Just go through a few different tempos?
__________________
Watch a purdie shuffle here!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFPmH1wrSiQ
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:35 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com