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  #1  
Old 01-24-2009, 04:21 PM
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Luis Luis is offline
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Default Playing Jazz...

Hi all...
I'm starting to play Jazz in a band (that it's not already set), and I'd like some tips
of you jazz players.

My question is:

How do you usually count all that solo measures (guitar and/or sax for example) and
keep track of where you are within the song.
In Rock it's easier to count the measures, with the riffs and stuff...

Thanks in advance (and hope I made myself clear).


LG
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  #2  
Old 01-24-2009, 04:45 PM
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Mastershake16 Mastershake16 is offline
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Default Re: Playing Jazz...

well you could do the class 1234, 2234,3234 or 123,223,323, kind of counting just adapt it to the time your playing in
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  #3  
Old 01-24-2009, 05:12 PM
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crlujan crlujan is offline
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Default Re: Playing Jazz...

I believe you're talking about song form, yes?

You've kinda just got to feel it. Listen to the changes. Get to know the tunes you're playing. The melody should be running in your head as you're comping for your band-mates while they're soloing. And you should feel/hear the melody while you're soloing.

Listen to a helluva lot of Jazz.

I was an upright bass player for many years doing standards. You've got to hear the changes.
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Old 01-24-2009, 05:49 PM
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Luis Luis is offline
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Default Re: Playing Jazz...

Quote:
Originally Posted by crlujan View Post
I believe you're talking about song form, yes?

You've kinda just got to feel it. Listen to the changes. Get to know the tunes you're playing. The melody should be running in your head as you're comping for your band-mates while they're soloing. And you should feel/hear the melody while you're soloing.

Listen to a helluva lot of Jazz.

I was an upright bass player for many years doing standards. You've got to hear the changes.

Yes, it's more about the song form I'm talking about ...
I've always listened to Jazz, since I was a kid, but now that I'm really paying attention
to it, it feels like the solo parts goes on forever...(lol), like if I should count a hundred measures...


Thanks for the replies.

LG
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  #5  
Old 01-24-2009, 08:56 PM
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WYdrummer09 WYdrummer09 is offline
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Default Re: Playing Jazz...

Jazz is more about feel. If you can feel what the soloist is doing. You don't have to count.

some other advice...

-If you get with a good bass player. Your jazz feel will improve tremendously!
-If you are reading a chart. It is there for guidance...not to control you. It is great to show you licks from the horns and such. but still....you can add other stuff.
-less is more!
-use your ears!
-when playing solos. play less ideas. & a good rule of thumb is to take some stuff out of the rhythm of the melody.

thats a starter...but there is so much more. enjoy playing! =]
__________________
"Where words fail, music speaks."
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  #6  
Old 01-24-2009, 09:06 PM
Boomka Boomka is offline
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Default Re: Playing Jazz...

Quote:
Originally Posted by crlujan View Post
I believe you're talking about song form, yes?

You've kinda just got to feel it. Listen to the changes. Get to know the tunes you're playing. The melody should be running in your head as you're comping for your band-mates while they're soloing. And you should feel/hear the melody while you're soloing.

Listen to a helluva lot of Jazz.

I was an upright bass player for many years doing standards. You've got to hear the changes.
Just in case someone missed the answer: YOU'VE GOT TO HEAR THE CHANGES.

I highly recommend that any drummer trying to learn jazz get themselves a fake book or a Real Book and learn to plunk out basic chord changes on the piano, as well as play/sing the melodies. You don't have to become a great piano player, but without some harmonic knowledge of the tunes you're playing you're - quite literally - lost.
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  #7  
Old 01-24-2009, 11:17 PM
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FunkyJazzer FunkyJazzer is offline
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Default Re: Playing Jazz...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luis View Post
it feels like the solo parts goes on forever...(lol), like if I should count a hundred measures...

You don't need to count 100 or so measures. You need to find out how long the form is (once through) and find out how many repeats of the chorus the soloist is doing

A standard form is typically 32 or 16 bars, split up into various, but often even sections. All you have to do is count 32 or 16 bars, then you know that's one chorus, then start over. Mark the start of each chorus with a crash or something to keep everyone (including yourself and the soloist) in check. If the soloist is doing 3 choruses, you just count 32 bars 3 times. It's easier than counting all the way to 100 etc. Knowing the chorus form like this will help you play better, and understand the soloist's approach to building climaxes etc towards the end of a solo.
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  #8  
Old 01-25-2009, 06:15 PM
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Luis Luis is offline
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Default Re: Playing Jazz...

Quote:
Originally Posted by FunkyJazzer View Post
You don't need to count 100 or so measures. You need to find out how long the form is (once through) and find out how many repeats of the chorus the soloist is doing

A standard form is typically 32 or 16 bars, split up into various, but often even sections. All you have to do is count 32 or 16 bars, then you know that's one chorus, then start over. Mark the start of each chorus with a crash or something to keep everyone (including yourself and the soloist) in check. If the soloist is doing 3 choruses, you just count 32 bars 3 times. It's easier than counting all the way to 100 etc. Knowing the chorus form like this will help you play better, and understand the soloist's approach to building climaxes etc towards the end of a solo.

Thank you FunkyJazzer, and all of you guys !

If someone wants to add something, will be welcomed...

Cheers !
LG
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  #9  
Old 01-25-2009, 07:23 PM
Dan Lane Dan Lane is offline
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Default Re: Playing Jazz...

I'll add something. Watch this video!

http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=M4-ZBQ...eature=related

Sonny Payne's swing is so ridiculously deep, its like, some sort of really deep thing. "Its the sort of swing that drummers have wet dreams about." QFT from youtube comments.

Also regarding keeping track of form, eventally you learn to feel the space of a 2 bar phrase, and then a 4 bar phrase, etc, so it becomes very easy to divide say, a 16 bar form in 4 4 bar phrases.

Also, I would say, do all of the workbook stuff to death, but also play along with alot of records. Basie is a great place to start.
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  #10  
Old 01-25-2009, 08:09 PM
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brittc89 brittc89 is offline
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Default Re: Playing Jazz...

Like a few other people have said, learn to hear the changes, that will expand your playing and you can stay away from just counting bars.
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