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  #1  
Old 02-27-2019, 01:15 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Triplet note dilemma

I've just recently started to study music theory because I'm a new drummer (started this year with no previous musical knowledge).
To get straight to the point. From a site (and I think many others use the same reasoning):

"• Sixteenth-Note Triplet: Equals two sixteenth-notes (or one eighth-note).
• Quarter-Note Triplet: Equals two quarter-notes (one half-note)."

To me this is wrong or just confusing. I guess that they are hinting at two pairs of sixteenth-notes and one pair of eighth-notes.

Because we know that: two eighth-notes equals four sixteenth-notes. Therefore in my line of reasoning, a sixteenth-note triplet is comprised of four eighth-notes, NOT two, as in the quote. Also how can a sixteenth-note triplet equal two sixteenth-notes when there is four whole sixteenth-note triplets in a bar of 4/4. So according to them there is only eight sixteenth-notes in a bar of 4/4? It's just so sloppy writing, they should say two pairs of sixteenth-notes!

Because how else would you point out a single note in a swing triplet like this:

https://imgur.com/a/9nMJTBF

If you follow the line of reasoning as in the quote then there is no way to describe the single notes in triplets. Because if you say quarter-note triplet and refer to a whole triplet containing three notes, then what do you call the single note to the left in the picture?

Obviously you cant call it a quarter note and if you call it a quarter-note triplet then many people think you are talking about the whole triplet.

So my proposal is to say for instance "quarter-note triplet-note" to properly describe the left note in the picture and clear up any confusion.

Or for instance when describing a 16th note triplet, saying that it has six 16th-note triplet-notes. That way you can talk about the individual notes within a triplet without any confusion.

Last edited by Cyran; 02-27-2019 at 03:19 PM.
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Old 02-27-2019, 02:30 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

The individual notes in a triplet, are called partials. The first partial, second partial etc.

A 16th note triplet fits in the exact space of 2 - 16th notes, except you play 3 triplet partials instead of 2 - 16th notes.

Sorry if I am repeating stuff you already know.

The image you posted was of a 1/4 note and an 8th note. Which normally takes up the space of 3 - 8th notes. Except your example has a triplet designation over the 2 notes, which tells you it's a triplet. The triplet would take the space of 2 - 8th notes. I'm not a fan of writing them that way, but that's what you encounter reading music sometimes.

Different ways to write the same idea.

Which doesn't make it simpler, but it's a necessary thing apparently.
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Old 02-27-2019, 02:37 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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Originally Posted by larryace View Post
The individual notes in a triplet, are called partials. The first partial, second partial etc.

A 16th note triplet fits in the exact space of 2 - 16th notes, except you play 3 triplet partials instead of 2 - 16th notes.

Sorry if I am repeating stuff you already know.
This is so confusing to me. You mean it fits into two pairs of 16th notes? Because from what I've learned 4 - 16th notes equals a 16th Note Triplet.

I just found this thread, I'm amazed that they are talking about basically the same thing and its not only me that's a bit perplexed by this.

http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...d.php?t=126779
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Old 02-27-2019, 02:42 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Think of it as 3 in the place of 2.

meaning: three 16th note triplets fit in the space of two 16th notes.

or three 8th note triplets fit in the space of two 8th notes.

etc.

It's just a naming convention, not a scientific thing.
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Old 02-27-2019, 02:51 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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Originally Posted by Bonzo_CR View Post
Think of it as 3 in the place of 2.

meaning: three 16th note triplets fit in the space of two 16th notes.

or three 8th note triplets fit in the space of two 8th notes.

etc.

It's just a naming convention, not a scientific thing.
Here is the problem which my post was about! Because when you say three 16th note triplets it can be interpreted in two ways. Either you are talking about three whole 16th note triplets (which equals 18 notes) or you are talking about three 16th-note triplets within one single 16th note triplet.

I grasp the math 100%, its easy. What I don't like, or grasp, is the terminology/way to describe these things. It's very confusing because people use the same terminology to describe different things.

Last edited by Cyran; 02-27-2019 at 03:05 PM.
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  #6  
Old 02-27-2019, 02:59 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

From: http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...=126779&page=2

Quoting Matt Ritter:

"I made sure to look in extremely reputable works by people like Vic Firth and Anthony Cirone. I found several examples of terms such as "quarter note triplet" being used in reference to the entire set of 3 notes. On the other hand, I also found examples where a term like this was used in reference to just a single note of the group of 3. In one drum book, the author actually went back and forth, using this type of terminology in BOTH ways a couple of times. Yikes! "

This is exactly what I'm talking about. How is this even possible? How can people that have played drums almost there whole life, make mistakes like this, or not be clear in what they are talking about? I just started and this dilemma stuck out to me like a sore thumb.
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  #7  
Old 02-27-2019, 03:13 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

It's just the way it is. You have to adapt to it. It's not a perfect system, but it's perfect enough. I agree sometimes it seems like it's more complicated than it should be.

When someone says play a triplet, I take it to mean play all 3 partials as a complete triplet. If someone says play 3 triplets...they could be referring to playing all 3 partials of a triplet, or 3 complete triplets. It depends on the person saying it, and the context. Yes you have to figure out what someone means, as there is more than one way to explain it, and write it.

Keep asking questions like you're doing, and all the inconsistencies of interpreting the written note (and even the spoken word) will be internalized, digested and become a part of you.

I'm trying to figure it out just like you.
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  #8  
Old 02-27-2019, 03:21 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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Originally Posted by larryace View Post
It's just the way it is. You have to adapt to it. It's not a perfect system, but it's perfect enough.
The system IS perfect, there is just people that don´t understand it...
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  #9  
Old 02-27-2019, 03:23 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Sanguinetti View Post
The system IS perfect, there is just people that don´t understand it...
Wrong! Its obviously not perfect. From my earlier post:

"From: http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...=126779&page=2

Quoting Matt Ritter:

"I made sure to look in extremely reputable works by people like Vic Firth and Anthony Cirone. I found several examples of terms such as "quarter note triplet" being used in reference to the entire set of 3 notes. On the other hand, I also found examples where a term like this was used in reference to just a single note of the group of 3. In one drum book, the author actually went back and forth, using this type of terminology in BOTH ways a couple of times. Yikes! "
"

If its perfect how do you explain mistakes like this in reputable and well-known books?
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Old 02-27-2019, 03:30 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

The inconsistencies you cite....think of it like slang in a language, or inflections...dialects even.

For example I could say, oh man that car is bad looking.

How I say the word bad, and indeed the way I say the entire sentence, will give it either a positive or a negative connotation.

I was always under the assumption that perfection doesn't exist in nature.

Except for Bo, of course :)
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  #11  
Old 02-27-2019, 03:30 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyran View Post
I've just recently started to study music theory because I'm a new drummer (started this year with no previous musical knowledge).
To get straight to the point. From a site (and I think many others use the same reasoning):

"• Sixteenth-Note Triplet: Equals two sixteenth-notes (or one eighth-note).
• Quarter-Note Triplet: Equals two quarter-notes (one half-note)."

To me this is wrong or just confusing. I guess that they are hinting at two pairs of sixteenth-notes and one pair of eighth-notes....
You are just not getting it, it´s perfectly logic.

Get a REPUTABLE teacher, please!
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Old 02-27-2019, 03:37 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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Originally Posted by Cyran View Post
Wrong! Its obviously not perfect. From my earlier
Because YOU dont understand you are not able to undertand what I wrote.

THE SYSTEM is perfect if you don´t understand it or someone (reputable or not) uses wrong terminology it doesn´t mean the system its not perfect...its just humans making mistakes.

Again, get a good teacher to explain it to you, you can take a lesson with me and I can explain it to you too...
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Old 02-27-2019, 03:37 PM
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Odd-Arne Oseberg Odd-Arne Oseberg is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Musical notation is very clear and simple. You obviosuly have to learn it step by step and understand the rhythms that it represent thoroughly, but it's a logical as can be.

Sort of have to agree with Alex.

If you don't get it, you've jumped over some basics.

I see some of these discussion sometimes, but it's not really up for discussion. It's just facts. You either learned the properly or not.
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Old 02-27-2019, 03:38 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Sanguinetti View Post
You are just not getting it, it´s perfectly logic.

Get a REPUTABLE teacher, please!
You are not getting it! Else why would professional/accomplished drummers talk about this issue (like here: http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/s...=126779&page=2)
If it was so perfect and logical then they would not talk about it and mistakes would not have been made in books. A perfect system is clear-cut and constant. There is no place for confusion, especially not for experienced people.

And also please refrain from posting anymore in this thread. I don't like you or the way you come across. You asked me for money in DM, to give some simple advice, that I got for free in my other (first) post. And also, you are clearly ignoring what I'm saying or the thread I'm constantly pointing to.
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Old 02-27-2019, 03:40 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyran View Post
"• Sixteenth-Note Triplet: Equals two sixteenth-notes (or one eighth-note).
• Quarter-Note Triplet: Equals two quarter-notes (one half-note)."
It would be clearer if it was written more conscientiously.

I would have written it like this:

Sixteenth note triplet: Takes up the space of 2 regular 16th notes. The only difference is you put 3 triplet partials in that space, not 2.

Quarter note triplet: Takes up the space of 2 regular quarter notes, but you are playing 3 triplet partials in the space of 2 regular quarter notes.
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Old 02-27-2019, 03:48 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryace View Post
It would be clearer if it was written more conscientiously.

I would have written it like this:

Sixteenth note triplet: Takes up the space of 2 regular 16th notes. The only difference is you put 3 triplet partials in that space, not 2.

Quarter note triplet: Takes up the space of 2 regular quarter notes, but you are playing 3 triplet partials in the space of 2 regular quarter notes.
Ok, could you please tell me where I'm wrong for thinking that a 16th-note triplet equals four 16th-notes? Because that's what I've learned and that's logical to me.

Like I said before it would be nicer (to me) if it said: equals two pairs of 16th notes. Because when you just say: "two 16th-notes", then I read that literally and it becomes wrong to me. Two eighth-notes equal four 16th-notes which equal one 16th-note triplet.
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  #17  
Old 02-27-2019, 04:00 PM
mesazoo mesazoo is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

quarter note = 1 note per beat
8th note = 2 notes per beat 8th note triplet = 3 notes per beat
16th note = 4 notes per beat 16th note triplet = 6 notes per beat or 3 notes in the space of 2 16th notes.
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Old 02-27-2019, 04:00 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyran View Post
Ok, could you please tell me where I'm wrong for thinking that a 16th-note triplet equals four 16th-notes? Because that's what I've learned and that's logical to me.


Dude.

3 whole note triplets would fit in the space of 2 regular whole notes.

3 half note triplets would fit in the space of 2 regular half notes.

3 quarter note triplets would fit in the space of 2 regular quarter notes.

3 eight note triplets would fit in the space of 2 regular eight notes.

3 16t note triplets would fit in the space of 2 regular 16th notes.

3 32nd note triplets would fit in the space of 2 regular 32nd notes.

It's quite universal.
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Old 02-27-2019, 04:02 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by mesazoo View Post
quarter note = 1 note per beat
8th note = 2 notes per beat 8th note triplet = 3 notes per beat
16th note = 4 notes per beat 16th note triplet = 6 notes per beat or 3 notes in the space of 2 16th notes.
I know all of that. I said it from the first post, and even in my recent post. There lies ZERO confusion for me with the math, the problem is how stuff are worded and talked about.
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Old 02-27-2019, 04:07 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by Odd-Arne Oseberg View Post
Dude.

3 whole note triplets would fit in the space of 2 regular whole notes.

3 half note triplets would fit in the space of 2 regular half notes.

3 quarter note triplets would fit in the space of 2 regular quarter notes.

3 eight note triplets would fit in the space of 2 regular eight notes.

3 16t note triplets would fit in the space of 2 regular 16th notes.

3 32nd note triplets would fit in the space of 2 regular 32nd notes.

It's quite universal.
I just realized what I did wrong. I had it written out on a paper with 6 16th notes with just a single 3 above. I see now that it should be two.

So to get back on track. If someone says play four-16th note triplets? What do you do? I would just play 4 notes. One whole 16th note triplet and the last note that follows in the second triplet.

But I get it that most would play 4 whole 16th-note triplets (12 notes).

Last edited by Cyran; 02-27-2019 at 04:39 PM.
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Old 02-27-2019, 04:13 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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Originally Posted by Cyran View Post
And also please refrain from posting anymore in this thread. I don't like you or the way you come across. You asked me for money in DM, to give some simple advice, that I got for free in my other (first) post. And also, you are clearly ignoring what I'm saying or the thread I'm constantly pointing to.
1) In your other post nobody answered you what was EXACTLY played (I guess you can´t still play it, right?), just general oppinions of what COULD BE.

In contrast I did a transcription using the correct notation of both examples, plus the stickings used by the players on the videos, and I was going to include a video of the thing also doing the examples myself at slow speed, all for 6 dollars...

Just offered this to you IF YOU WANTED you had no obligation.


2) I´m not ignoring what you said...is that you still don´t understand what I´m saying since you don¨t understand the theory.

I will be ignoring you in the future, no problem...

Take care!
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Old 02-27-2019, 04:24 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyran View Post
Ok, could you please tell me where I'm wrong for thinking that a 16th-note triplet equals four 16th-notes? Because that's what I've learned and that's logical to me.

Like I said before it would be nicer (to me) if it said: equals two pairs of 16th notes. Because when you just say: "two 16th-notes", then I read that literally and it becomes wrong to me. Two eighth-notes equal four 16th-notes which equal one 16th-note triplet.
No one here is saying 4 - 16th notes equal a 16th note triplet. 4 -16th notes are not the same as a 16th note triplet. Period. You need to eject that notion, that 4 - 16th notes equal a 16th note triplet. It's all wrong, and it's confusing you because it's false info. A triplet feels different than straight time. 4 - 16th notes is straight time. Divisible by 2. A triplet is divisible by 3. So a 16th note triplet would perfectly fit in the space of 2 - 16th notes, except you're playing 3 partials of a triplet as opposed to 2 - 16th notes.

In my mind, there are only 2 types of time, straight time (even in odd meter) and triplet time.

Triplet time and straight time are 2 different feels.

1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and

as opposed to

1-trip-let-2-trip-let-3-trip-let-4-trip-let

Just singing it you can hear the difference. Music is either evenly divided by 2 or evenly divided by 3, basically speaking. (not including any odd times, in my mind, they fall under straight time)

Keep outlining your sticking points, you're doing great.
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Old 02-27-2019, 04:29 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by larryace View Post
No one here is saying 4 - 16th notes equal a 16th note triplet. 4 -16th notes are not the same as a 16th note triplet. Period. You need to eject that notion, that 4 - 16th notes equal a 16th note triplet. It's all wrong, and it's confusing you because it's false info. A triplet feels different than straight time. 4 - 16th notes is straight time. Divisible by 2. A triplet is divisible by 3. So a 16th note triplet would perfectly fit in the space of 2 - 16th notes, except you're playing 3 partials of a triplet as opposed to 2 - 16th notes.

In my mind, there are only 2 types of time, straight time (even in odd meter) and triplet time.

Counting, regular 16th notes are 1 E And Ah
Triplets are counted 1-trip-let 2-trip-let (or 1-trip-let-and-trip-let)
So, for 4 - 16th notes in just one bar of music...you could fit 2 - 16th note triplets in that same space.

1 E And Ah (regular 16th notes)
1-trip-let, And-trip-let (16th note triplets)
(both above examples take up the same amount of time/space.


Obviously the triplet will sound faster because you have to squeeze 1/3 more notes into the same space.

Triplet time and straight time are 2 different feels.

1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and

as opposed to

1-trip-let-2-trip-let-3-trip-let-4-trip-let

Just singing it you can hear the difference. Music is either evenly divided by 2 or evenly divided by 3, basically speaking. (not including any odd times, in my mind, they fall under straight time)

Keep outlining your sticking points, you're doing great.
I'm sorry, I was completely wrong. Like I said in my previous post it was an error from my side, the confusion and frustration about the main issue I had, didn't help either.

"I just realized what I did wrong. I had it written out on a paper with 6 16th notes with just a single 3 above. I see now that it should be two."

Thank you for the excellent explanation on how to count them! It is as clear as day now :)

Last edited by Cyran; 02-27-2019 at 04:39 PM.
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Old 02-27-2019, 04:49 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

I'm sorry for coming off as irritated and angry in my earlier posts. I've been staying up late the last couple of days trying to learn music theory. This is all completely new to me. My brain feels fried trying to sort all this information in a good way. I've never been patient, I just want to learn stuff as fast as possible, neglecting the limitations of my own brain. I realize stuff like this takes time, and maybe with time, I will see the original issue I had more clearly or just fall in line with the majority.

By that I mean that if asked to play four 16th-note triplets, then I would play four whole 16th-note triplets (12 notes), instead of just four notes.

Last edited by Cyran; 02-27-2019 at 05:03 PM.
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Old 02-27-2019, 04:56 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyran View Post

And also please refrain from posting anymore in this thread. I don't like you or the way you come across. You asked me for money in DM, to give some simple advice, that I got for free in my other (first) post. And also, you are clearly ignoring what I'm saying or the thread I'm constantly pointing to.
Now you may not know this as you're new here, but Alex is one of the most experienced players/teachers we have on this forum. His point of view is certainly worth listening to.

It does take time to get this stuff, and it goes hand-in-hand with learning to read music, and so on.

There are many people here that will give you good advice if you want to listen to it.
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Old 02-27-2019, 05:01 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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Originally Posted by Bonzo_CR View Post
Now you may not know this as you're new here, but Alex is one of the most experienced players/teachers we have on this forum. His point of view is certainly worth listening to.

It does take time to get this stuff, and it goes hand-in-hand with learning to read music, and so on.

There are many people here that will give you good advice if you want to listen to it.
Point taken - Thank you!
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Old 02-27-2019, 05:01 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

Holy smokes. This thread needs one or two fewer double espressos...
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Old 02-27-2019, 05:04 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

And I've been exactly where you are now, completely confused and wanting to wring the neck of whoever invented written notation....my own silly immaturities...

But you learn to work with what you got and just accept that's the way it is.
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Old 02-27-2019, 05:33 PM
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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Originally Posted by Cyran View Post
If its perfect how do you explain mistakes like this in reputable and well-known books?
You're very smart to catch these inconsistencies. Most students don't notice, and probably wouldn't care if they did notice. Kudos!

But these are drum books, not legal dissertations, or Nobel Prize winning research articles. You're imposing an absurdly high standard, onto an instrument and body of knowledge that is barely a century old. Not everything is as well put together as you would like, and that's actually okay. If you go far enough in any field of study, you'll find inconsistencies, even in math.

If pressed, you could call the quarter note under the triplet bracket a couple of things:
1. "An eighth note triplet quarter note"
2. "A quarter note under a triplet bracket"

A saying comes to mind: the music came first, and the notation came second.
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Old 02-27-2019, 05:54 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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Originally Posted by brentcn View Post
You're very smart to catch these inconsistencies. Most students don't notice, and probably wouldn't care if they did notice. Kudos!

But these are drum books, not legal dissertations, or Nobel Prize winning research articles. You're imposing an absurdly high standard, onto an instrument and body of knowledge that is barely a century old. Not everything is as well put together as you would like, and that's actually okay. If you go far enough in any field of study, you'll find inconsistencies, even in math.

If pressed, you could call the quarter note under the triplet bracket a couple of things:
1. "An eighth note triplet quarter note"
2. "A quarter note under a triplet bracket"

A saying comes to mind: the music came first, and the notation came second.
Very well said - Thanks! You gave me a new perspective :)

Interesting examples. One thing that came to mind (which I mentioned earlier I think) is to just say, for instance: Quarter-note triplet-note. Just add the extra 'note' after 'triplet' to clearly state that you are talking about a single note within the quarter-note triplet. But I realize it probably sounds stupid and strange :P But at least for me that would clear up any confusion.
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Old 02-27-2019, 06:25 PM
brentcn brentcn is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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Very well said - Thanks! You gave me a new perspective :)

Interesting examples. One thing that came to mind (which I mentioned earlier I think) is to just say, for instance: Quarter-note triplet-note. Just add the extra 'note' after 'triplet' to clearly state that you are talking about a single note within the quarter-note triplet. But I realize it probably sounds stupid and strange :P But at least for me that would clear up any confusion.
Yeah, none of the phrases will have a good "taste" as they're spoken. FWIW, I have never, except in an instructional book, seen a quarter note and an 8th note underneath a triplet bracket. It's just too confusing to the reader. Instead you can:

1. Write three 8th note triplets, beamed together, and tie the first two together.
2. Beam two 8ths together, place an 8th note rest in between them, and place a "3" above this group of notes.
3. Write the measure in 12/8 and then use quarter and 8th notes without having to bracket a "3" above the notes.

The example in your picture is meant to illustrate the mathematical relationship between quarters and eighths, not a realistic piece of music.
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Old 02-27-2019, 06:25 PM
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Alex Sanguinetti Alex Sanguinetti is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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Sort of have to agree with Alex. ....

I see some of these discussion sometimes, but it's not really up for discussion. It's just facts. You either learned the properly or not.
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Dude...
HAHA!!!

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Now you may not know this as you're new here, but Alex is one of the most experienced players/teachers we have on this forum. His point of view is certainly worth listening to...
Thank you "Odd-Ane Oseberg" and "Bonzo_CR" for the support...!
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Old 02-27-2019, 06:53 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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Originally Posted by brentcn View Post
Yeah, none of the phrases will have a good "taste" as they're spoken. FWIW, I have never, except in an instructional book, seen a quarter note and an 8th note underneath a triplet bracket. It's just too confusing to the reader. Instead you can:

1. Write three 8th note triplets, beamed together, and tie the first two together.
2. Beam two 8ths together, place an 8th note rest in between them, and place a "3" above this group of notes.
3. Write the measure in 12/8 and then use quarter and 8th notes without having to bracket a "3" above the notes.

The example in your picture is meant to illustrate the mathematical relationship between quarters and eighths, not a realistic piece of music.
I got it from here: https://imgur.com/a/q8NRlPj or https://imgur.com/a/GxxUXx9 (Music sheet for Pink Floyd - Money)
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Old 02-27-2019, 09:33 PM
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Winston_Wolf Winston_Wolf is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

I've seen the quarter note/eighth note AND the eighth/rest/eighth used fairly interchangeably when the writer/transcriber is attempting to indicate a shuffle/swing feel, as seen in the Money transcription.

I've read the whole thread, and I'm still not sure if the dilemma/confusion from the original post has been cleared up.

Triplets seem to cause an awful lot of confusion, but they really boil down to this: You are compressing three notes into the same amount of time it normally takes to play two of those kinds of note.

Whether dealing with half, quarter, eighth, or sixteenth, that relationship holds true.
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Old 02-27-2019, 10:11 PM
Mustion Mustion is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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Triplets seem to cause an awful lot of confusion, but they really boil down to this: You are compressing three notes into the same amount of time it normally takes to play two of those kinds of note.

Whether dealing with half, quarter, eighth, or sixteenth, that relationship holds true.
This sums it all up right here.

I would add that you're 'compressing' three notes in the space of two evenly which is what implies the change in feel from two to three.

It might help to think of triplets not as a thing necessarily but as a treatment. You're taking quarter notes and "tripletizing" them. And instead of thinking about how many in terms of quantity, I think in terms of how many beats; one beat gives you three notes, four beats gives you twelve. Maybe not the most technical or academic approach but the impression I get from this thread is that technical and academic overthinking has caused this confusion int he first place...
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Old 02-27-2019, 10:23 PM
Cyran Cyran is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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And instead of thinking about how many in terms of quantity, I think in terms of how many beats; one beat gives you three notes, four beats gives you twelve.
Yeah I've figured now that it seems to be the consensus and I'll just fall in line and think like that from now on.

Anyway, this was an interesting discussion that I've learned a lot from! Have to say that I really like the community, plenty of friendly and helpful people that have patience and can relate to a beginners struggle :)
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Old 02-27-2019, 10:43 PM
Gottliver Gottliver is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

I’d like to point out that the swing feel or triplet feel is notated in variety of ways. Covered very well in John Rileys book.

Triplets are 3 notes played together. 1 2 3, 2 2 3, 3 2 3, 4 2 3 counted in a 4/4 measure as 1 triplet = 1 quarter note. Subdivide as you like.

It doesn’t have to swing to be a triplet. “Money” swings. These are not the same thing.

Just my $0.02. Maybe I’m wrong....
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Old 02-28-2019, 12:59 AM
brentcn brentcn is offline
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Default Re: Triplet note dilemma

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I got it from here: https://imgur.com/a/q8NRlPj or https://imgur.com/a/GxxUXx9 (Music sheet for Pink Floyd - Money)
The first way is much better, because all the 8ths are swung in that piece. Telling a musician “swing the 8ths in this piece” is a lot better than writing it out every measure. So I guess it does pop up. Doesn’t stand out in my memory for some reason, except for modulations, which is whole different can of worms. In general it’s best to keep the page as clean as possible.

I once wrote a horn chart in 12/8, pretty syncopated stuff. Nobody could read it but me. Turns out that horns prefer triplets in 4/4.
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