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Old 10-28-2018, 06:26 AM
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Reggae_Mangle Reggae_Mangle is offline
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Default Mixing up pedals for double bass

Symmetry and beauty aside, are there any benefits to using the same brand of pedals for your double pedal setup?

Naturally, when you have a single bass drum, there doesn't appear to be any kind of way to do this.

That said, you could do things like making one pedal long and the other short with something the Pearl Eliminators or Demon Drives.

I can share my own experience with trying something like this. I yesterday auditioned for a death metal band and for the practice I took my Trick pedals. The one on the right was a shortboard Pro-1V, while the left pedal was a longboard Bigfoot.

I was really happy at how much better a response and power I could get from the shortboard under my right foot, allowing me to play quicker notes easily. With the longboard, it was easy to play quick doubles or mix with the right leg for triplets.

And surprisingly, I found it much easier to balance while playing heel up single strokes too, whereas sometimes I would struggle to play singles at the pace we were going at.

Pretty sure this isn't some kind of confirmation bias, if that's what it seems like. My legs are pretty different, they just seem to like different types of pedal motion, methinks.
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Old 11-01-2018, 04:23 AM
beyondbetrayal beyondbetrayal is offline
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Default Re: Mixing up pedals for double bass

It would be similar to 2 different sized sticks if you have a weak left hand. I'd suggest working on the weaker limb.

Now, if you are doing it for different sound or techniques that would be a different story.. like having a 22 inch kick and an 18. More for different textures. not for long metal runs of 16ths.

On that note.. Setting double pedals to the exact same settings doesn't always work for me due to the lag of the shaft, or angle.... i tend to keep the distance from head the same, but sometimes tweak the springs so they FEEL even. not so they are at the same point..

I personally like both pedals the same so it feels even.
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Old 11-01-2018, 04:01 PM
rebonn rebonn is offline
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Default Re: Mixing up pedals for double bass

Russ Miller does this with the same Falcon Pedal. He has different drives, beaters and sets them differently. I don't think I could do it. I've got enough problems without incorporating lop sidedness.
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Old 11-01-2018, 06:17 PM
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Default Re: Mixing up pedals for double bass

I think that musicians do things all the time that are specific to who they are and the way they play. I don't see this as being anything different, and I don't see it as being in the same category as using different sized sticks for different hands, although I do see some of that as well. (A friend of mine specifically uses the but end of a stick in his left hand because it gives him a thicker snare sound, but he plays the right stick normally.)

It sounds to me like you've figured out exactly what you need from an equipment perspective to bring things into balance with your feet. There are always going to be those who argue that you should put in the time to work your technique to the point where both feet are more or less equal, but I see this solution as being just as viable.
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Old 11-02-2018, 11:19 AM
bud7h4 bud7h4 is offline
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Default Re: Mixing up pedals for double bass

Quote:
Originally Posted by trickg View Post

There are always going to be those who argue that you should put in the time to work your technique to the point where both feet are more or less equal, but I see this solution as being just as viable.
LOL, I would hope so.

If a 10 year old child can play double bass properly without mix-matching her pedals then so can you. Try and identify the problem and just work it out mate.

Last edited by bud7h4; 11-04-2018 at 11:31 AM.
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Old 11-02-2018, 02:55 PM
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Odd-Arne Oseberg Odd-Arne Oseberg is offline
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Default Re: Mixing up pedals for double bass

It depends I guess. Never seen what you're proposing outside of not being able to afford and repair stuff to be the same.

Gadd isn't comfortable playing single on his double pedlas so the plays 2+1, but how much double pedal does he really play. His priorities make sense in his case.

Morgan Rose used to play the butt end and his sig stick is the same in both ends. Now, from what I've seen and heard he's pretty much destroying his body with poor technique, so...

For sure it's possible for someone to be made in such a way that both feet can't work the same way, but it's probably really rare.

People have done all sorts of things. Not just on drums. I see no reason for myself to ever do it, but we should all do what works. As long as it's not really far out, if it works for you playing the music you want, then I see no harm.

This brings up all sorts of conversations I've had with younger students looking for excuses, but you might not belong in that category.
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Old 11-04-2018, 09:52 AM
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Reggae_Mangle Reggae_Mangle is offline
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Default Re: Mixing up pedals for double bass

It's just body mechanics, I guess.

For example, my body isn't exactly symmetrical either: both my arms have a slightly different crook in them. I can't straighten both of them out like most people, they'll always be a bit curved inwards. And if I rotate them, at certain angles, it becomes more pronounced.

So I have to make compromises like a French grip when I'm playing the snare, but if I move my right hand over to play the ride, I switch to a kind of German grip with that hand. Due to the same issue, it's also very tricky for me to use my fingers when playing, because I would have to rotate the arm in a way that would be unnatural (to me) in order to get the stick to bounce correctly.

Definitely not a role model when it comes to technique as a consequence.

So those are my hands. As for my feet, for the longest time I would struggle with getting a consistent double stroke with any kind of conviction with my right leg. I could do it when playing slower parts, but if I tried to sneak in a fast double, the way the board moves made it harder to catch the rebound further away from the head in a way that I could move it back for the second strike.

I recently acquired a shortboard conversion kit for my pedal and swapped the footboards. I found that the shorterboard allowed for the beater to move further away from the head after the rebound even when playing fast.

But after playing so long on longboards, balance was elusive when it came to playing eighths with my left foot. So on a lark, since I had the pedal plates anyway, I just swapped out the left pedal for a longboard.

And it just worked in a way I wasn't expecting.

I just thought it is interesting, since we are programmed to be attracted by symmetry, but the assymetrical pedal setup is working really well for me.
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Old 11-04-2018, 10:13 AM
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Default Re: Mixing up pedals for double bass

I think I agree. When I actively tried to play two bass drums, I left my primary bass drum pedal the way it always is. But the second bass drum, I set that pedal up close to how my hi-hat pedal is set (a little bit of a steeper angle) - because I figured that I'm not playing balanced anyway, and my hi-hat foot is not the same as my bass drum foot, so to me it makes sense not to have both pedals feeling the same (in this case, my main pedal is a DW5000 accelerator, and the extra pedal was a DW3000 with a regular round cam).

Of course, I am not a natural double bass drum player and hardly ever need two bass drums. But it felt more natural for me to make the second bass drum feel like my hi hat pedal, since all my right foot knows is hi hat stuff (I'm left-footed).
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