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  #1  
Old 02-13-2019, 11:57 AM
Buzzly Buzzly is offline
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Good morning all,

My 7 year old daughter has recently started lessons and seems to be taking to it quite well. The problem I have is that my living arrangements will not support an acoustic kit.

Edrums seem to be a bit of a minefield and I have absolutely no knowledge. I have been advised by one shop that buying anything less than the Roland td17 is just throwing money away but by the time I add pedal, throne amp etc I will be getting north of a £1000! As a single parent I do not want to spend that kind of money unless it really is absolutely necessary.

I have seen cheaper options like alesis and whd but have read mixed reviews so thought i would take it to the forum. Maybe I will just get more mixed opinions but any advice would be welcome.

Thanks in advance.
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  #2  
Old 02-13-2019, 12:04 PM
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JustJames JustJames is offline
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Default Re: Advice

Here's a left field suggestion...

For home practicing, I bought a Pearl Rhythm traveller, which I set up with the mesh heads (these kits come with a set of mesh heads and acoustic heads).

The mesh heads are near as dammit silent, and the Rhythm Traveller is a small kit, so won't take up too much space.

The downside for a seven year old, is she may need to hear the drums in order to practice. The near silent setup works for me because for me it's all about the muscle memory...and staying married.

Peeps who know about E drums will be along in a little while...
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Old 02-13-2019, 12:29 PM
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KEEF KEEF is offline
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The shop is wrong.... the smaller (cheaper) e-set ups will do your seven yr old just fine for now. If it becomes a long term thing and you can justify an upgrade, sell the basic one to another parent with a youngster who is still figuring out if drumming is for them.

Good for you encouraging your daughter to play drums...I have girls of 16,12 and 6 but i can't get any of them interested - breaks my heart.
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Old 02-13-2019, 01:28 PM
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BertTheDrummer BertTheDrummer is offline
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Default Re: Advice

One thing to think about, depending on your "current living situation" which was a very nondescript and vague way to say it, even a e-drum set might be problematic. For example if you live in an upperfloor apartment (or flat depending on where in the world you live), the constant pounding of a kick on the floor will annoy the people living underneath you... not as much as a full drumset but still something to think about.
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Old 02-13-2019, 01:35 PM
Buzzly Buzzly is offline
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Apologies for being vague.
I live in a back to back terrace which means I have 3 neighbours. I have a converted cellar with a heavily insulated floor so i don't see the kick pedal causing a massive issue. More the fact that an acoustic drum kit will be too noisy for the neighbours
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Old 02-13-2019, 01:46 PM
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electrodrummer electrodrummer is offline
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Default Re: Advice

Shop is talking twaddle. Sounds like an iPhone salesman.

SO, let's start with basics
(a) What's your empirical budget and,
(b) Where are you located (UK somewhere I'm guessing)?

Tell me those and I'll throw some suggestions at you. I've got stuff from every manufacturer so won't just scream whatever I've got is the best ;)
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Old 02-13-2019, 02:08 PM
Buzzly Buzzly is offline
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I am in the UK and its not so much about budget as to what is required for a 7 year old to learn to play. If I had to buy a td17 then I would but it just seems excessive for where she is right now.

Thanks for all replies so far.
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Old 02-13-2019, 02:11 PM
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electrodrummer electrodrummer is offline
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Hi

Where in the UK, so can give specific advice.

A budget would be useful to provide specific examples. I understand it's less than £1000, so is £800 OK? £600? Etc. You've probably got an amount in mind you're happy with. 🙂
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  #9  
Old 02-13-2019, 02:49 PM
Buzzly Buzzly is offline
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Near Leeds,

I could go up to a 1000 but only want to spend what I need to to get her a good learning instrument. She has only had about 6 hours of lessons but is showing a natural ability and I am conscious that she will progress much faster having a kit at home. I am also aware of the fact that young kids can be fickle and even though she is loving it now it could be yesterdays news at any time (hopefully not).

She uses a TD11 at her lessons.
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Old 02-13-2019, 02:59 PM
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Fuzrock Fuzrock is offline
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Default Re: Advice

For a seven year old, the Alesis Nitro Mesh would be adequate. Here in the states it's only $350. It's the best bang for the buck I've seen in recent years. Comes with everything but a throne and headphones.
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  #11  
Old 02-13-2019, 04:25 PM
Ajthundersticks Ajthundersticks is offline
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Default Re: Advice

Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzzly View Post
Near Leeds,

I could go up to a 1000 but only want to spend what I need to to get her a good learning instrument. She has only had about 6 hours of lessons but is showing a natural ability and I am conscious that she will progress much faster having a kit at home. I am also aware of the fact that young kids can be fickle and even though she is loving it now it could be yesterdays news at any time (hopefully not).

She uses a TD11 at her lessons.
If she uses a TD11 at her lessons then why not a TD11/TD11kv for at home?
There are plenty on the second hand market over here and they fall well within the budget. You also have the option of rubber pads & mesh heads with that kit depending on what you want to spend.
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  #12  
Old 02-13-2019, 05:43 PM
brentcn brentcn is online now
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Default Re: Advice

As someone who frequently teaches young kids, IMO a student will progress beyond an e-kit in about a year. At a very young age like 7, the student learns gross motor coordination, involving the arms, wrists, and legs. By age 8 or 9, fine motor coordination begins to develop, involving the fingers and ankles in a more sophisticated way, and at that point, it becomes important to have an instrument that responds as it should.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ajthundersticks View Post
If she uses a TD11 at her lessons then why not a TD11/TD11kv for at home?
There are plenty on the second hand market over here and they fall well within the budget. You also have the option of rubber pads & mesh heads with that kit depending on what you want to spend.
+1. An e-kit will be fine for now. Later, an acoustic kit with muffles on top of the toms, a practice pad on top of the snare, a bass drum filled up with pillows, and low volume cymbals would be ideal.
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  #13  
Old 02-14-2019, 05:06 PM
rubymax rubymax is offline
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Default Re: Advice

The first e drum kit for my son was Alesis nitro. It is enough to start and enter in world of drumming. It is important that e kit have " real" kick pedal so you can achieve more realistic feel about kick drum tehnicque. When he has progressed in drumming and become more focused on drums and cymbals sound we sell it and buy Alesis DM10 mkII studio kit. After one Year we sell it and buy Roland TD 17 KVX. I want to tell you that for the begining you really don't need for super expensive gear, but if your daughter Will progress and show interest in playing drums then you go step by step in buying more expensive gear. Maybe for the start I reccomend Alesis nitro mesh e drum kit.

Last edited by rubymax; 02-14-2019 at 09:00 PM.
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