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Old 04-23-2010, 07:12 AM
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shadowtick shadowtick is offline
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Default when the levee breaks

Hi folks.

I have just started working on the groove from "When the Levee Breaks". I am using the transcription from Danny Britts website

http://dannybritt.com/main1.htm

I am struggling with the placement of the bass drum. my right hand wants to follow my left foot all of the time, so I am either able to play the bass drum part, and lose the right hand pattern, or I can hold the right hand pattern and miss the bass drum part.

I am working at a very slow pace, and still cannot get my limbs to work independently of each other.

Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance
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Old 04-23-2010, 08:26 AM
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zakhopper316 zakhopper316 is offline
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Default Re: when the levee breaks

set your metronome to 50 bpm and play 16th notes on you bass drum while playing quarter notes on the high hat,
that should help
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Old 04-23-2010, 09:14 AM
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bermuda bermuda is offline
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Default Re: when the levee breaks

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Originally Posted by shadowtick View Post
I am working at a very slow pace, and still cannot get my limbs to work independently of each other.
Here's a helpful shift in perspective - get your limbs to work interdependently. That is, with each other... not separately from each other.

Start slow - really slow - and be aware of what your limbs are doing on each beat. Sometimes one is playing, sometimes two or three are playing. But once you're familiar with where and when each limb lands, and how they work together, soon you'll find it feels natural, not difficult.

If you write music or tabs, it also helps to write the beat out and see where the notes are. Practice it a 16th note at a time if necessary, and your hands and feet will soon build the relationship with each other that will result in the part you want to play. What's cool is, once they know how to work together, you may find that you can switch hand & foot parts, left and right, too.

Bermuda
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Old 04-23-2010, 04:25 PM
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double_G double_G is offline
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Default Re: when the levee breaks

great tune to learn !!! and that break near the end is one of my top 10 rock fills. my suggestion is to use Steve Jordans's method (actually one groove he did on a Sheryl Crow record is close to the Levee groove - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0G5LNzdgbA ): sing the drum groove & dance/move your body while you are singing it. if you have the time, sing the groove ALL DAY & then sit behind the drums that night. should be night & day. something about singing / dancing internalizes some kind of muscle memory while you memorize the groove.

another idea is to just play hi-hat & BD for awhile...when that is solid, add snare backbeats.

Last edited by double_G; 04-23-2010 at 04:32 PM. Reason: added S. Jordan groove
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Old 04-23-2010, 05:05 PM
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shadowtick shadowtick is offline
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Default Re: when the levee breaks

Thanks to all of you for the helpful suggestions.

Interesting side note, when i was having my morning coffee and checking the responses, I read them out loud to my wife. I noticed a typo, Freudian slip, act of fate or whatever you want to call it. I actually typed the word "Left" in reference to my bass drum foot when I meant to type "Right"

-1 for me on failure to proofread effectively.

+100 on the recognition that the challenge exists between my ears.

I am confident that the combination of physical practice suggestions coupled with Bermuda's suggestion of a perspective adjustment will lead to improved results.

That was a wonderful clip of Steve Jordan that was posted, I have always been a fan of Sheryl Crow. Saw her live once, great show.

It is a good thing to be a small part of such a wonderful "Brotherhood of people who hit things in a non-criminal way"

Thanks again
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Old 04-23-2010, 05:45 PM
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caddywumpus caddywumpus is offline
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Default Re: when the levee breaks

Quote:
Originally Posted by bermuda View Post
Here's a helpful shift in perspective - get your limbs to work interdependently. That is, with each other... not separately from each other.
Quote:
Originally Posted by zakhopper316 View Post
set your metronome to 50 bpm and play 16th notes on you bass drum while playing quarter notes on the high hat,
that should help
Yes and yes!

...and 202020202020
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Old 04-23-2010, 10:17 PM
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Default Re: when the levee breaks

Practice it really slowly.

Also, use the hi hat to guide the rest of your limbs. It will really help. You will know what notes are supposed to be played together with the hi hat and which notes that are supposed to be played in between.
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Old 04-23-2010, 11:37 PM
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Jazz+Ska! Jazz+Ska! is offline
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Default Re: when the levee breaks

A couple things that help me when I am going over a complex or busy beat is to write it out really big on a separate piece of paper then faintly draw lines between each sixteenth note so you can tell what exactly is in each beat, when it falls, and what it is being played with. Then, play it so slow that you are consciously thinking out what is happening in each sixteenth. Over time, it will become muscle memory and then you can bring it up to tempo. By the way, one of the best ways to get good at being interdependent is to study jazz (not big band swing, but real jazz. An example of a good book to work out of is John Riley's The Art of Bop Drumming)
Good Luck!
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Old 04-26-2010, 07:40 AM
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Default Re: when the levee breaks

Quote:
Originally Posted by shadowtick View Post
Hi folks.

I have just started working on the groove from "When the Levee Breaks". I am using the transcription from Danny Britts website

http://dannybritt.com/main1.htm

I am struggling with the placement of the bass drum. my right hand wants to follow my left foot all of the time, so I am either able to play the bass drum part, and lose the right hand pattern, or I can hold the right hand pattern and miss the bass drum part.

I am working at a very slow pace, and still cannot get my limbs to work independently of each other.

Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance
Ahhhh Great stuff. Brings back memories!

This was the first song that challenged my coordination as a young teen just starting out. Me and my friends all loved Zeppelin and we all played the right instruments to form a band with me the drummer obviously.

I had exactly the same problem. I could hear the beat and everything wanted to work fine but the right hand just kept on following the bass drum. lol!

Frustrating times as I didn't have a teacher and my practice included nothing but playing along with records and bashing away. This was the first song that made me figure out how to break things down into simple things to work on bigger problems.

What I did was very simple to work on it, and work it did!

Try this: Simply play eighth notes on the hats, and with nothing else going (ie no left hand, no left foot, and no change on the other rhythms) just play the sixteenth note bass drum hits against the hi hat eighth notes. You can also make it simpler at first than take it up a notch each time, like this....

So it would look like this: R=right hand, B=bass drum. Counts as 1+2+3+4+ etc and bass drum is 1e+a 2e+a 3e+a 4e+a yeah? All makes sense so far? These are two bar things ok, again, with the right hand in eighth notes and bass in sixteenths.
R R R R R R R R R
B BB B
R R R R R R R R R
B BB B BB B
R R R R R R R R R
B BB BB BB BB

I hope this makes sense. If it doesn't just ask and I'll let you know some more. But, work on just this a lot before playing the full beat. Take it really, really slow. Also, even before that practice just the bass drum part by itself to the point where you don't have to think about it anymore. With no hands at all playing, just the bass drum. The less you have to think about one part (ie the more internalised and natural it is), the more likely you will play it easily with with other limbs going.
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  #10  
Old 04-28-2010, 06:47 AM
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Monica McCoy Monica McCoy is offline
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Default Re: when the levee breaks

Another way to approach it would be to play it with 16th notes on the hats so that your bass drum is lining up with your hand every time. After you got that grooving, just play 8th notes on the hats and you are home free.

The slower you go the faster you learn. :)
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