DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussion forum for all drum related topics. Use this forum to exchange ideas and information with your fellow drummers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 08-14-2018, 03:27 PM
PorkPieGuy's Avatar
PorkPieGuy PorkPieGuy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 2,743
Default The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Anyone ever turn down a gig just to find out later that it was a great decision? Maybe you avoided a disaster. Maybe you avoided an empty crowd or auditorium. Or something different entirely? What's your story?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-14-2018, 04:25 PM
mikyok's Avatar
mikyok mikyok is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Tipton in the mighty Black Country
Posts: 1,981
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by PorkPieGuy View Post
Anyone ever turn down a gig just to find out later that it was a great decision? Maybe you avoided a disaster. Maybe you avoided an empty crowd or auditorium. Or something different entirely? What's your story?
Any gig that relies on 'ticket sales on the door' to pay the band or where I'm paid in anything other than cash, aka goldbricking gigs

Battle of the Bands aka battle of who's got the most friends.

Headlining original gigs with other bands knocking the crap out of your gear.

Charity gigs........see getting paid in anything other than cash.
__________________
I aint farting on no snare drum
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-14-2018, 05:20 PM
PorkPieGuy's Avatar
PorkPieGuy PorkPieGuy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 2,743
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

The current band that I'm in got booked to play at a local-yet-huge Christian organization. The place employs thousands, and I was under the impression that we would be playing for several hundred of these folks. I was told that they had a DW backline kit that I would be playing, there would be PA system, and everything would be great! It got down to the wire, and one of the band members couldn't make it.

After the gig came and went, one of the guys found out that it was actually a small women's group of about 10-15, and the person they got to perform was a lone piano player who just sang a couple of songs and that was it. I don't even think it was a paid gig. He said that the piano player was perfect for what they needed. I'm glad we ended up not playing; it would have been more trouble than what it was worth. It would have been total overkill.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-14-2018, 06:45 PM
Dr_Watso's Avatar
Dr_Watso Dr_Watso is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 6,756
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

I've said no to a whole bunch of gigs I'm glad I wasn't there for. Only happened in reverse a few times where I wish we had taken a gig.

Or do you mean band, opposite your other thread?
__________________
"Overthinking is at the very core of our mission here." -Uncle Larry
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-14-2018, 07:37 PM
WhoIsTony?'s Avatar
WhoIsTony? WhoIsTony? is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: the city that never sleeps
Posts: 34
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

I didn't necessarily turn it down ... I took it then left when shit got out of line and glad I did

I took a gig in 2006 with a NYHC band called Danny Diablo

they had just been signed to Travis Barkers label ... who cares ... I didn't ... I liked the money I was offered to be on the road

two weeks after I joined we left for Warped Tour ... we got to the opening day of the tour ... got our free sneakers and socks and immediately got moved to the "main stage" for the entire tour right between Every Time I Die and Thursday ... sweet right !!!... 3 square meals a day ... showers ... yeah , not so much

the singer and band leader was spending all the labels money on coke ... the guys were a bunch of thug assholes ... and about a month and a half into the tour we got kicked off because the bass player punched a security guy in the face because he was confronted about pissing on one of the trailers that the tour people use to conduct business ...

I quit immediately after that ...

rented a car and left the tour ... they had to get a scrub fill in and play shitty club gigs just to get back across the country and home because all the money the band was supposed to be making was spent

I never did get all the money I was supposed to be paid for that tour ... but I made a few contacts along the way that have propelled other things in my career

this is the only video I know of that captures anything that band did out there in that month and a half or so

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Al2tPeSVRJ0

Last edited by WhoIsTony?; 08-14-2018 at 08:54 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-14-2018, 08:01 PM
larryace's Avatar
larryace larryace is offline
"Uncle Larry"
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In beautiful Bucks County, PA
Posts: 21,249
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

GREAT story Tony. Who doesn't love a good war story? Thanks for that vid with that 15 seconds of your past. Thugs, really? I'm not seeing it. They all look like nice church going folk to me :)

I was asked to do a gig at a quiet Italian restaurant on the Main Line in Philly. So I get there and the owner thought we could set up...the whole band...on a 4 x 4 stair landing. Really? It was a real bullshit gig. So I hung around for about 3 minutes to try and see if there was any place for us to pull this off.

Then the owner joked about having me on one landing, and the other 2 guys across the room on another 2 landings... I said, ha ha ha good one, I'll see you later. I said to the guy who asked for my services...I can't believe you drug me all the way down here in rush hour traffic without first checking the place out, and walked out.

The other 2 did the gig, (guitar and keys) and the owner stiffed them anyway.

Losers, all of them. Glad I split.

Then months later I get a call from him asking for donations because his 64 Strat got stolen. I told him off again. What nerve! What goes around...I have to admit, I was a little bit happy for his loss, just desserts and all, and I should hate myself for it but I don't. Ha!
__________________
Levis/Hanes/Timberlands/Custom made socks

Last edited by larryace; 08-14-2018 at 11:53 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-14-2018, 08:05 PM
alparrott's Avatar
alparrott alparrott is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wenatchee, WA
Posts: 6,626
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

I was offered a chair in a local blues band that has only had one constant member in the eight years I've been in town, and this constant member is the bandleader-slash-guitarist. I enjoy playing with the guy at a blues jam every now and again, but I think the two sub dates I did with one incarnation of the band gave me plenty of reasons not to commit.

I was invited to a local all-star gig for a neighbor's fiftieth birthday when I lived in the Monterey area. I invited the folks over to my place to rehearse. What a production - singer, bass player, three or four guitarists, a keyboard player, horns, the whole nine yards - but no prepared setlist and nobody in charge. So after a four-hour rehearsal in which we did not complete even one song, I apologized to my neighbor and said I probably wasn't their guy. Wonder how the party went - it was only two weeks after that horrible "rehearsal".
__________________
Al Parrott
"Jus suum cuique"
-------------------------------------------------------
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-14-2018, 08:23 PM
8Mile's Avatar
8Mile 8Mile is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Detroit, MI
Posts: 3,973
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Man, I feel like Tony's worst gigs are more exciting than my good ones!


I auditioned for a country band a few months ago. But after the first jam together, I withdrew my name for consideration. It wasn't a great band, but it wasn't terrible. My reason for pulling out of it was just the music they play isn't my thing. I'm trying to put together my own group to play the music I want to play and this would have been just one more thing getting in the way of me doing that.



Sorry, no juicy, drama-filled story. I just made a simple decision and I'm happy with it.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-14-2018, 08:57 PM
eclipseownzu's Avatar
eclipseownzu eclipseownzu is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: New London, CT
Posts: 1,478
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Somewhere around 2005 the hardcore band Hoods was looking for a drummer to fill in on their european tour. Through a friend of a friend I got an audition and spent a few hours jamming and hanging out with the guys. I was excited about the posibility of touring europe on a zero budget tour, playing clubs, and just living the rock n roll dream.

I never got a call back, which bummed me out at the time. I heard later that the whole tour was a debacle and they had to come home early after a bunch of shows were cancelled or never really booked in the first place. I think that what was initially a bummer deal may have been the best thing that could have happened.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-14-2018, 11:17 PM
PorkPieGuy's Avatar
PorkPieGuy PorkPieGuy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 2,743
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Watso View Post

Or do you mean band, opposite your other thread?
Either way. These responses are great so far!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 08-15-2018, 05:04 AM
DrumEatDrum's Avatar
DrumEatDrum DrumEatDrum is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 9,446
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

My story isn't exciting at Tony's but...

Somehow I met this guy who needed a drummer. He was both the son and nephew of well-known musician/celebrities. The 3 song demo he gave me was fantastic (this was pre-everything musical online, back when people around CDs). Maybe not totally my thing, but it was modern, edgy with great hooks.

We jammed. He liked me, I liked him, he told me I was the guy for his band.

He had all these connections through his dad. We're going to play a show in another state, he just calls his dad's travel agent. Need backline gear, ok, I can have whatever I want when I arrive. Awesome.

After my last band had imploded as we were in record company negotiations, I was on cloud 9 to have another chance. This guy had the last name, the songs, the connections, we just needed to build the rest of it.

OK, it's time to learn the set for this up upcoming show.

So, the next song is a cover. Um. ok, I guess so. Ok, eventually we get around to learning one of this other original tunes, and.....it's not good.

Then I find out one of his other songs I did like was actually a cover.

As we build the set, it becomes very apparent he only had two good songs, numerous covers, and a handful of not-very-good partially written songs.
Not exactly anything that's going to set the world on fire, or make a tour, or even an interesting show.

Oh, and I've still never met the bass player at this point.

It becomes increasingly clear the reason this guy has never made it previously, and why he's jamming with me, despite all he has going for him, is he just doesn't have any songs.

Eventually, I lose interest in the gig. He loses interest in me. He suggests that he re-hire his old drummer just for this one show, and I tell him that is a great idea.

A few years later I read he gave up music to become a porn star.

A few years after that, I read he didn't make it as a porn star either and moved to Canada. In an interview, he discussed how flaky musicians were in Los Angeles and that's why he never became a rock start.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08-15-2018, 05:07 AM
JustJames's Avatar
JustJames JustJames is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 3,171
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrumEatDrum View Post
...
A few years later I read he gave up music to become a porn star.

A few years after that, I read he didn't make it as a porn star either and moved to Canada. ....
That's an interesting hierarchy

1. Rock Star
2. Porn Star
3. Canadian, eh?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 08-15-2018, 12:47 PM
JustJames's Avatar
JustJames JustJames is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 3,171
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

One of the very many guitarists to have been through my band went on to a similar (classic rock) band. He's a guy who I know socially, and he asked me if I would sit in with their band "and don't bother to bring anything, 'cause the drummer is cool with you using his gear, and it's TOP stuff".

On arrival I discover a tired looking kit which still has the heads it left the store with...apparently a very long time ago. The toms' heads are more cratered than the moon. One of them has an Elastoplast cross from rim to rim and the snare has an assortment of toiletry products taped to it. The cymbals clang, the bass drum pedal is very tired, and generally it's a very unloved kit.

Everybody is playing through small, tinny bedroom type amps. Even the bass player is playing through an amp smaller than a PC screen. I'm a big fan of tone, but I don't think anybody else in the room was.

In all honesty was fun, but not the same kind of fun that I have with my regular band, where the 2 guitarists are tone junkies - as am I - and the bass player is happy to take guidance on how to get the best tone from her setup.

I was asked if I'd like to join them full time, but I declined politely.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 08-15-2018, 09:22 PM
double_G's Avatar
double_G double_G is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 784
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

i once turned down a Blues gig in downtown ATL in early 90s. some well known BBQ place i am blanking. there was a drive-by shooting & the drummer caught a slug in his calf...i think while playing (!!!!).
__________________
Fortune Drums | Yamaha | Bosphorus and Sabian
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08-15-2018, 11:56 PM
Chollyred Chollyred is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Loganville, Ga.
Posts: 346
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by double_G View Post
i once turned down a Blues gig in downtown ATL in early 90s. some well known BBQ place i am blanking. there was a drive-by shooting & the drummer caught a slug in his calf...i think while playing (!!!!).
Sounds like Fat Matt's!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 08-16-2018, 12:12 AM
Dr_Watso's Avatar
Dr_Watso Dr_Watso is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 6,756
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chollyred View Post
Sounds like Fat Matt's!
That's not downtown, unless it moved.

Granted, I've been a vegetarian for like 10 years now, so it was a while ago I went through that spot.

Still remember it. Amazing BBQ... But I remember it being around a bunch of strip-joints... Not downtown.
__________________
"Overthinking is at the very core of our mission here." -Uncle Larry
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 08-16-2018, 01:02 PM
makinao's Avatar
makinao makinao is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Metro Manila, Philippines
Posts: 724
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

I was in between teaching jobs, and my country was going through a titanic change of political leadership. A college buddy and his brother asked me to join a jazz quartet. We did two weeks of racking up standards, then landed a weekend gig at a club just outside a US military base two hours away from my home. We were fed and housed in a motel owned by the club owner. We then got invited back a couple more weekends. After that, we we invited to be the full-time in-house band. But the school year was starting, and I was offered a part-time teaching job at a state university near my home. I saw this as a foot through the door towards a full time position. So I begged off, and the band got part time drummers from around that city.

The band imploded after 6 months, and the club closed down after a year. My buddy and his brother emigrated to the USA, got day jobs, and play gigs occasionally. I lost track of the pianist. I got tenure in the university ten year later, and 30 years later am very happy where I am.

It was a very interesting experience though, something I enjoy telling my students about.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 08-16-2018, 02:53 PM
rebonn's Avatar
rebonn rebonn is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 194
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

We're asked to turn down at gigs all the time.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 08-16-2018, 11:10 PM
rogue_drummer's Avatar
rogue_drummer rogue_drummer is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 1,366
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

This wasn't a gig, but "potential" gigs. A few years ago I was in a band where the leader decided to put "his old band" back together and needed a drummer since their old drummer was either in jail or moved away (I never did get a straight answer to this). It was a classic rock band and I was band-less at the time and this opportunity came my way so I took it. We rehearsed on Saturday afternoons in the leader's air conditioned garage. We'd play for an hour or so, take a break and drink Margaritas his wife prepared and drink a shot or two of Fireball. Then rehearse for another hour or so. We had 4 hours of material down pat and went looking for gigs around town. Every time we had an opportunity to play out, someone always flaked out and gave some lame excuse as to why they couldn't play the gig. I found out later all these guys wanted to do was jam on Saturdays and drink Margaritas. Period. No freakin' intention of gigging. The day I was going to quit via email their bass player shot an email around that morning saying he has to quit the band due to work-related issues. The band folded. Then a month or so later one of the guys sent around an email asking how everyone was and if anyone was interested in getting together to gig. Ya, right....
__________________
I don't aim to be the best, just the best looking.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 08-17-2018, 12:01 AM
larryace's Avatar
larryace larryace is offline
"Uncle Larry"
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In beautiful Bucks County, PA
Posts: 21,249
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by rebonn View Post
We're asked to turn down at gigs all the time.
Clever. Witty. Inventive :)
__________________
Levis/Hanes/Timberlands/Custom made socks
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 08-17-2018, 02:49 PM
PorkPieGuy's Avatar
PorkPieGuy PorkPieGuy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 2,743
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by rogue_drummer View Post
Every time we had an opportunity to play out, someone always flaked out and gave some lame excuse as to why they couldn't play the gig.

I'm feeling this pain so much right now. I think the only time my family is busy is between Thanksgiving and Christmas. My wife knows how important it is for me to play out, so she makes it a priority in our home. If we have a dinner party planned, we change dinner party plans so I can gig. If we have a birthday party planned for the kids on the same day, we either move days or times. She makes this happen for me because it's cheaper than therapy (which I'm pretty sure I need, seriously). Playing music helps me fight demons. I don't think other bands I've played with feel the same. Ever.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 08-17-2018, 03:50 PM
Ajthundersticks Ajthundersticks is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Southampton, England
Posts: 127
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by PorkPieGuy View Post
I'm feeling this pain so much right now. I think the only time my family is busy is between Thanksgiving and Christmas. My wife knows how important it is for me to play out, so she makes it a priority in our home. If we have a dinner party planned, we change dinner party plans so I can gig. If we have a birthday party planned for the kids on the same day, we either move days or times. She makes this happen for me because it's cheaper than therapy (which I'm pretty sure I need, seriously). Playing music helps me fight demons. I don't think other bands I've played with feel the same. Ever.
What an inspiration she is!
I can't complain, my wife-to-be is so supportive.
I know people who have given up on music when they enter relationships and it's such a shame, some of them were very decent musicians.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 08-17-2018, 06:32 PM
rogue_drummer's Avatar
rogue_drummer rogue_drummer is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 1,366
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

I'm blessed as well. I got lucky in the fact that my wife loves live music and following various local bands and we actually met at one of my gigs. She supports my music endeavors 100%.
__________________
I don't aim to be the best, just the best looking.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 08-17-2018, 07:46 PM
Merlin5's Avatar
Merlin5 Merlin5 is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: London UK
Posts: 1,018
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

I once turned down some band called the Beatles. Good thing really, they were going nowhere.
__________________
No drums no life, know drums know life...
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 08-17-2018, 07:57 PM
Hollywood Jim's Avatar
Hollywood Jim Hollywood Jim is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Posts: 3,922
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Here's one from my past. It's about a gig that I would have turned down had I had the chance.

It was late in 1969 and John my bass player called me and told me that we had a gig on Catalina Island. We had played there once before. The only thing I dreaded was lugging my drums to the island and the long boat ride.
However, this time the trip became somewhat more interesting. The guys had invited an extra guitar player by the name of Bill Connors to join us on this gig. This seemed strange to me. Apparently for some reason we needed an extra guitar player for this gig. I was yet to find out why. On the boat ride to the island the guys in the band informed me that for this particular gig we were going to pretend to be the Strawberry Alarm Clock. Whaaaaat ?!? I think someone at that point had grabbed my arm so that I would not jump overboard.

The guys in the band did not want to tell me about this plan ahead of time. They thought that I would probably not want to go if I knew we had to pretend to be the Strawberry Alarm Clock. They were probably correct, me being so honest and all. Well, at least I would have voted no. The Strawberry Alarm Clock was a fairly popular and well known band at that time because they had had a hit song on the radio. So here I was stuck on a boat in the middle of the Pacific Ocean heading for a gig that could turn into a disaster. And to top it off we were going to pretend to be a “One Hit Wonder” psychedelic, bubble gum, teeny bopper band. After all, we were an R&B, blues and heavy rock band. Apparently our booking agent, Don Podolor’s company, The American Entertainment Agency, was also the booking agent for the Strawberry Alarm Clock. Maybe they could not make the gig. Or maybe they were having internal band problems. They did after all break up sometime in 1970 or 71’. No matter, we were on our way. And I’m sure Don asked us to do this gig because he knew we had the talent to pull off the charade.

On the long boat ride I had horrible thoughts. Would they stone us on the pier as we disembarked? Would they show up with torches and pitchforks at our hotel room after the show? And what if I was asked to sign an autograph, who would I sign it as? Oh crap, and me without my bell bottomed pants, and guru shirt!

We arrive in Catalina and there on the pier I saw a small group of Strawberry Alarm Clock fans. Oh Gosh! As I came down the gang plank someone asked me, “Are you really the Strawberry Alarm clock?” I simply pointed to whoever was behind me and said, “Ask Him”. I was looking for the nearest exit off the pier. While walking to our hotel room I noticed posters in several shop windows advertising that the Strawberry Alarm Clock was playing that night. Oh Gosh, there was that sinking feeling in my stomach again. I remember just sitting in the hotel room not wanting to go out exploring.

The time arrived to set up and play. We played in a high school auditorium. We had a large crowd. And I remember that the audience was full of young girls and boys with a lot of their parents. We played the Alarm Clock’s signature song, Incense and Peppermints. Of course I had never played it before, but for me it was no problem. I had heard the song on the radio (unfortunately) at least a million times. I noticed that the guys in the band somehow knew the song. They must have rehearsed it without me, those little sneaks !

As I played I was very focused on the audience. As the concert progressed I noticed some very skeptical faces in the crowd. After all we had only played one of Strawberry Alarm Clock’s songs. I remember not enjoying playing very much because I was so uncomfortable. I was waiting for the crowd to start chanting FAKE! FAKE! and progress into a full blown riot. But that did not happen. I guess loud R&B and hard rock soothes the savage beast. Or, more likely; most people don’t know anything about the technical part of music anyway.

A most interesting thing did happen that night. Of course we were playing R&B, blues and hard rock songs. And as we played, the crowd slowly changed. It started out with a large group of teenage boys, girls and their parents. But it slowly evolved into a small group of older teens, and some adult hippy types. I guess news travels fast in small island communities. I remember later on in the concert one guy showed up with long un-kept hair. He was really enjoying our music. It looked like he had been living in the back woods of the island. The concert ended well and those who stayed with us seem to enjoy the music.

I remember feeling a bit relieved as we were traveling back to the mainland on the boat. I was finally safe from the wrath of the islanders. We had gotten paid so everything was cool. I think the Strawberry Alarm Clock may have lost a few fans that night. Unfortunately, we could not have gained any fans on this trip because we were of course the Strawberry Alarm Clock and not who we really were.


.
__________________
"To play a wrong note is insignificant. To play without passion is inexcusable." - Beethoven
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 08-17-2018, 08:05 PM
trickg's Avatar
trickg trickg is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 670
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

This isn't really too exciting, but it's semi-relevant.

I am a former active duty military musician (trumpet) and was fortunate to land a gig in a Washington DC area premier group, the Old Guard Fife & Drum Corps. The DC premier military bands are permanent duty - you never get moved and you finish your career in the same place, which enables you to buy a house, put down roots, etc.

I'd become disgruntled with some of the crappy politics of the Fife & Drum, and I left at the 10 year mark to pursue a career in information technology, but a few years later I decided I wanted to try to get back into a premier DC military band to finish out my career and earn a retirement, and a trumpet opening came up for the Annapolis Naval Academy Band, which is very close to where I live.

To make a long story short, in spite of the fact that I had prepped well for the audition, nerves got the better of me and I had an epic crash and burn of an audition. Needless to say, I didn't get the gig.

The "fortunate" part of not getting that gig is that not long after that, the Annapolis Naval Academy Band got gutted and seriously pared down. There are only a small handful of trumpet slots left, so I'd have either been forced into an early retirement, or shuffled off to some other fleet band elsewhere, which is not what I wanted.

As I type this, I'm currently in a National Guard band, still trying to earn my 20, but I think I dodged a bullet of sorts with the Navy band thing.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 08-17-2018, 08:37 PM
PorkPieGuy's Avatar
PorkPieGuy PorkPieGuy is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 2,743
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollywood Jim View Post
On the boat ride to the island the guys in the band informed me that for this particular gig we were going to pretend to be the Strawberry Alarm Clock. Whaaaaat ?!?
The first thing that entered my mind was "Listen to the Flower People."

Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 08-18-2018, 12:50 AM
DrumEatDrum's Avatar
DrumEatDrum DrumEatDrum is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 9,446
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Well, Jim didn't actually turn down the gig, but I think he wins anyway. lol

Wow, impersonating another band!
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 08-23-2018, 10:58 PM
CommanderRoss's Avatar
CommanderRoss CommanderRoss is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Tucson, Arizona
Posts: 564
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrumEatDrum View Post
A few years later I read he gave up music to become a porn star.

A few years after that, I read he didn't make it as a porn star either and moved to Canada. In an interview, he discussed how flaky musicians were in Los Angeles and that's why he never became a rock star.
Maybe there's a downside here I'm not seeing...=-D

I've done a few audition rounds and one band had me pegged as the one they wanted. Jammed with them for a few rounds and the in-state "tour" was set.
I had this feeling that it was all going too well, so I didn't really put a lot of effort into it. Come to find out the boom lowered and it all fell apart.

I turned it down in my heart and attitude so when it went south, I didn't really care.
__________________
"You're never fired, you're just not asked to do the next thing". -Liberty DeVitto
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 08-24-2018, 01:07 AM
Push pull stroke Push pull stroke is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 1,753
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by trickg View Post
This isn't really too exciting, but it's semi-relevant.

I am a former active duty military musician (trumpet) and was fortunate to land a gig in a Washington DC area premier group, the Old Guard Fife & Drum Corps. The DC premier military bands are permanent duty - you never get moved and you finish your career in the same place, which enables you to buy a house, put down roots, etc.

I'd become disgruntled with some of the crappy politics of the Fife & Drum, and I left at the 10 year mark to pursue a career in information technology, but a few years later I decided I wanted to try to get back into a premier DC military band to finish out my career and earn a retirement, and a trumpet opening came up for the Annapolis Naval Academy Band, which is very close to where I live.

To make a long story short, in spite of the fact that I had prepped well for the audition, nerves got the better of me and I had an epic crash and burn of an audition. Needless to say, I didn't get the gig.

The "fortunate" part of not getting that gig is that not long after that, the Annapolis Naval Academy Band got gutted and seriously pared down. There are only a small handful of trumpet slots left, so I'd have either been forced into an early retirement, or shuffled off to some other fleet band elsewhere, which is not what I wanted.

As I type this, I'm currently in a National Guard band, still trying to earn my 20, but I think I dodged a bullet of sorts with the Navy band thing.
I auditioned for the main Air Force band back when it was led by colonel Lowell Graham. After talking to the percussionists in the band, I was really glad I DIDN’T get the gig. I bet you can guess why, too.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 08-24-2018, 03:15 AM
GetAgrippa's Avatar
GetAgrippa GetAgrippa is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: U.S.
Posts: 3,206
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollywood Jim View Post
Here's one from my past. It's about a gig that I would have turned down had I had the chance.

It was late in 1969 and John my bass player called me and told me that we had a gig on Catalina Island. We had played there once before. The only thing I dreaded was lugging my drums to the island and the long boat ride.
However, this time the trip became somewhat more interesting. The guys had invited an extra guitar player by the name of Bill Connors to join us on this gig. This seemed strange to me. Apparently for some reason we needed an extra guitar player for this gig. I was yet to find out why. On the boat ride to the island the guys in the band informed me that for this particular gig we were going to pretend to be the Strawberry Alarm Clock. Whaaaaat ?!? I think someone at that point had grabbed my arm so that I would not jump overboard.

The guys in the band did not want to tell me about this plan ahead of time. They thought that I would probably not want to go if I knew we had to pretend to be the Strawberry Alarm Clock. They were probably correct, me being so honest and all. Well, at least I would have voted no. The Strawberry Alarm Clock was a fairly popular and well known band at that time because they had had a hit song on the radio. So here I was stuck on a boat in the middle of the Pacific Ocean heading for a gig that could turn into a disaster. And to top it off we were going to pretend to be a “One Hit Wonder” psychedelic, bubble gum, teeny bopper band. After all, we were an R&B, blues and heavy rock band. Apparently our booking agent, Don Podolor’s company, The American Entertainment Agency, was also the booking agent for the Strawberry Alarm Clock. Maybe they could not make the gig. Or maybe they were having internal band problems. They did after all break up sometime in 1970 or 71’. No matter, we were on our way. And I’m sure Don asked us to do this gig because he knew we had the talent to pull off the charade.

On the long boat ride I had horrible thoughts. Would they stone us on the pier as we disembarked? Would they show up with torches and pitchforks at our hotel room after the show? And what if I was asked to sign an autograph, who would I sign it as? Oh crap, and me without my bell bottomed pants, and guru shirt!

We arrive in Catalina and there on the pier I saw a small group of Strawberry Alarm Clock fans. Oh Gosh! As I came down the gang plank someone asked me, “Are you really the Strawberry Alarm clock?” I simply pointed to whoever was behind me and said, “Ask Him”. I was looking for the nearest exit off the pier. While walking to our hotel room I noticed posters in several shop windows advertising that the Strawberry Alarm Clock was playing that night. Oh Gosh, there was that sinking feeling in my stomach again. I remember just sitting in the hotel room not wanting to go out exploring.

The time arrived to set up and play. We played in a high school auditorium. We had a large crowd. And I remember that the audience was full of young girls and boys with a lot of their parents. We played the Alarm Clock’s signature song, Incense and Peppermints. Of course I had never played it before, but for me it was no problem. I had heard the song on the radio (unfortunately) at least a million times. I noticed that the guys in the band somehow knew the song. They must have rehearsed it without me, those little sneaks !

As I played I was very focused on the audience. As the concert progressed I noticed some very skeptical faces in the crowd. After all we had only played one of Strawberry Alarm Clock’s songs. I remember not enjoying playing very much because I was so uncomfortable. I was waiting for the crowd to start chanting FAKE! FAKE! and progress into a full blown riot. But that did not happen. I guess loud R&B and hard rock soothes the savage beast. Or, more likely; most people don’t know anything about the technical part of music anyway.

A most interesting thing did happen that night. Of course we were playing R&B, blues and hard rock songs. And as we played, the crowd slowly changed. It started out with a large group of teenage boys, girls and their parents. But it slowly evolved into a small group of older teens, and some adult hippy types. I guess news travels fast in small island communities. I remember later on in the concert one guy showed up with long un-kept hair. He was really enjoying our music. It looked like he had been living in the back woods of the island. The concert ended well and those who stayed with us seem to enjoy the music.

I remember feeling a bit relieved as we were traveling back to the mainland on the boat. I was finally safe from the wrath of the islanders. We had gotten paid so everything was cool. I think the Strawberry Alarm Clock may have lost a few fans that night. Unfortunately, we could not have gained any fans on this trip because we were of course the Strawberry Alarm Clock and not who we really were.


.
That's regaling people with a great tale. I enjoyed that. I hope someone had a cowbell for Incense and Peppermints? So that was the only song of theirs you played the whole evening? You should have told them sorry we aren't the real SAC -they had to cancel and then announce you are really "Crazy Elephant" and broke out in "Gimme, gimme good lovin'" LOL. Must have been a gullible crowd I think they would have bought it??
__________________
"I roll to the tune of a different drummer ;) "
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 08-24-2018, 10:56 AM
Woolwich Woolwich is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 645
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GetAgrippa View Post
That's regaling people with a great tale. I enjoyed that. I hope someone had a cowbell for Incense and Peppermints? So that was the only song of theirs you played the whole evening? You should have told them sorry we aren't the real SAC -they had to cancel and then announce you are really "Crazy Elephant" and broke out in "Gimme, gimme good lovin'" LOL. Must have been a gullible crowd I think they would have bought it??
I’d never heard the song before so I checked it on YouTube. Thank heaven it was pre internet and pre VCR days otherwise the audience might have asked why the drummer wasn’t singing the lead vocal as he did at the time!
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 08-24-2018, 05:00 PM
trickg's Avatar
trickg trickg is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 670
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Push pull stroke View Post
I auditioned for the main Air Force band back when it was led by colonel Lowell Graham. After talking to the percussionists in the band, I was really glad I DIDN’T get the gig. I bet you can guess why, too.
I can make a fairly educated guess. Let's see how close I get.
  • The better gigs in the band were held by the most senior people who kissed the most bootie, and not necessarily the best players
  • Most of your job was going to be comprised of playing snare, bass or cymbals for funerals and ceremonies
  • Random silliness and BS to be followed without question based on decisions made by the aforementioned poor leaders who were elevated due to their aforementioned skill at kissing bootie
    etc.
Am I close?
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 08-25-2018, 03:32 AM
Push pull stroke Push pull stroke is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 1,753
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by trickg View Post
I can make a fairly educated guess. Let's see how close I get.
  • The better gigs in the band were held by the most senior people who kissed the most bootie, and not necessarily the best players
  • Most of your job was going to be comprised of playing snare, bass or cymbals for funerals and ceremonies
  • Random silliness and BS to be followed without question based on decisions made by the aforementioned poor leaders who were elevated due to their aforementioned skill at kissing bootie
    etc.
Am I close?
Actually, it was because the percussionists were complaining about what a d-bag Graham was. He rehearsed the band literally 6 hours a day, and thought he was the greatest thing since sliced bread. No thanks. I didn’t even rehearse 6 hours a day in college (4 was usually the limit, not including sectionals), and I don’t need a jerk for a boss. I make more than those guys do now, love my boss, and live in an area with very low cost-of-living. They make less and live in suburban D.C. on enlisted men’s salaries, you know?
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 08-27-2018, 03:44 PM
trickg's Avatar
trickg trickg is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 670
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Push pull stroke View Post
Actually, it was because the percussionists were complaining about what a d-bag Graham was. He rehearsed the band literally 6 hours a day, and thought he was the greatest thing since sliced bread. No thanks. I didn’t even rehearse 6 hours a day in college (4 was usually the limit, not including sectionals), and I don’t need a jerk for a boss. I make more than those guys do now, love my boss, and live in an area with very low cost-of-living. They make less and live in suburban D.C. on enlisted men’s salaries, you know?
Ok - all of that makes sense, although I will say that commanders come and go - the trick is to outlast them if you can. They had a guy in the last handful of years get dismissed because he was such a d-bag.

I get it though. I left the Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps because I had an absolutely abysmal commander - couldn't lead by example if they tried and very much had a "do as I say, not as I do" approach to leadership. Awful. That person stayed there a good long bit after I left too.

As for living in suburban DC on enlisted pay, it's not that bad when you consider that the lowest rank in those bands is E6, and you only get taxed on base pay - housing and subsistence allowances are tax exempt, so it winds up helping quite a bit. I make good money in my IT career, but if I were to go back to active duty as an E6, it would be a pay cut, but it wouldn't be that big of a pay cut.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 08-28-2018, 04:24 AM
dale w miller's Avatar
dale w miller dale w miller is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: BKLYN, NJ
Posts: 586
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Quote:
Originally Posted by double_G View Post
i once turned down a Blues gig in downtown ATL in early 90s. some well known BBQ place i am blanking. there was a drive-by shooting & the drummer caught a slug in his calf...i think while playing (!!!!).
Daddy D’s is my guess. It was close to Memorial Ave.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 8Mile View Post
Man, I feel like Tony's worst gigs are more exciting than my good ones!
The crazy ones are more memorable than the average ones, that’s for sure.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 08-29-2018, 06:32 AM
moxman moxman is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 562
Default Re: The gig that you turned down, and it's a good thing you did!

Back in the 80's.. I was out of work and broke.. so I joined a Motown revival band which had 2 'Sam & Dave' pro singers with tales of being stars out on the east coast bla bla bla.. so I practiced every day for 2 weeks with just the rythmn section to get the show down.. Then I was told I had to be in the union... so okay no problem I'd been in the union for years but had let it lapse. So I get to the union office and give them my name and the lady says " oh - I have a check for you" Whaat??? Turns out a band I 'd played ran into a problem with a hotel that re-negged on paying a month contract we'd had .. and the union eventually came through when the hotel went out of business. I took the cheque and gleefully danced down a busy downtown street! I then realized that I had enough money to afford to go back to school and was sick of being broke.. and decided to pass on the Motown tour. I saw the band months later when they returned.. and the story I got was that I was lucky I didn't go.. they lived in shacks on the road, we're barely paid enough to eat - let alone pocket money.. played sketchy clubs where amps were stolen, bar fights every night and bottles tossed for target practice.. good times!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com