DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM   

Go Back   DRUMMERWORLD OFFICIAL DISCUSSION FORUM > General Discussion

General Discussion General discussion forum for all drum related topics. Use this forum to exchange ideas and information with your fellow drummers.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 07-21-2014, 04:32 PM
Galogalas Galogalas is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 4
Default A new drummer

Hello fellows.
I just bought my new drums 1 week ago. I use YT for lessons but can't seem to find any good exercises for techniques and all that stuff. Is anyone that could show me or explain me basic that I could have a good start?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-21-2014, 04:39 PM
mmulcahy1's Avatar
mmulcahy1 mmulcahy1 is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
Posts: 2,043
Default Re: A new drummer

Check out Drumeo (which used to be "FreeDrumLessons.com) on Youtube - search for both. They have a lot of freebies out there that can show you a bunch of stuff to get you started.

While Youtube has a ton of fantastic valuable resources on it, it also has a ton of garbage from people who think they know what they're talking about.

Sift through all the information carefully to find what you need.

Happy drumming. and welcome!
__________________
Gretsch Catalina Maple Drums / Ludwig Supraphonic Snare Drum / Paiste Giant Beat & 2oo2 Cymbals
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-21-2014, 05:26 PM
drummer-russ's Avatar
drummer-russ drummer-russ is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: St. Peters Mo
Posts: 1,176
Default Re: A new drummer

I used this site when I was getting back into drumming.

http://drumrudiments.com/

Can be boring working on rudiments but it is necessary. I still do some rudiment work every week.
__________________
Playing live in front of appreciative audience is the 2nd best thing in the world!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-21-2014, 05:30 PM
KamaK KamaK is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: East Coast
Posts: 5,825
Default Re: A new drummer

If you're just beginning.

1: Invest part of your practice time into stick control. There's a book called "Stick Control" that's great but pretty dry. If you're looking for web freebies, use Vic's lessons.. You absolutely need to learn this, and should invest time in this early on, else you'll develop chicken wings and teacup fingers.


2: Have a real drummer help set up your kit. He'll explain what goes where, and why. Take notes, pictures, and measurements until you can break down and set up on your own. Have him help you with tuning. Have him make sure you're holding the stick correctly. Have him make sure you're striking the drums/cymbals correctly.

3: Practice to a metronome/pulse.

4: Learn the basics of reading music. You don't have to sight-read. You don't have to know the full breadth of intricacies. You should be able to look at a 16th-note rhythm and hash it out in your head, and play it. It honestly only takes a week to get there. You'll pick up the rest as you go, almost by accident.

5: Get a tutor/teacher. It can be as infrequent as once a month. Keep track of the things you're struggling with, and bring them to your teacher's attention. Tell him not to be nice to you, as the purpose is to fix your broken drumming and not have your ego stroked for $50 an hour.

6: Spend enough time having fun that it motivates you to continue playing. Beginning on drums can be a drag. Nothing sucks the fun out of anything more than an academics. Fight the power.

Early on, you'll find that there's a lot of pragmatic study to be done. Once you learn the fundamentals, it becomes much more free-form. The bottom line is that you need to know how to hold/use the sticks, communicate rhythms with others on (digital) paper, and sort out any bad habits before they become permanent.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-21-2014, 05:30 PM
markiet1966's Avatar
markiet1966 markiet1966 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: East Yorkshire, UK
Posts: 140
Default Re: A new drummer

Drum Channel is pretty good too.

http://www.drumchannel.com

Mark
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-21-2014, 06:06 PM
Bernhard's Avatar
Bernhard Bernhard is offline
Founder Drummerworld
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Riehen - Basel - Switzerland
Posts: 2,237
Default Re: A new drummer

I would also suggest a great Website: DRUMMERWORLD.com

There is a Drum-Clinic Section with some helpful stuff on all levels:

http://www.drummerworld.com/drumclinic.html
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-21-2014, 06:58 PM
WaitForItDrummer's Avatar
WaitForItDrummer WaitForItDrummer is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Outside London, UK
Posts: 345
Default Re: A new drummer

Quote:
Originally Posted by KamaK View Post
If you're just beginning.

1: Invest part of your practice time into stick control. There's a book called "Stick Control" that's great but pretty dry. If you're looking for web freebies, use Vic's lessons.. You absolutely need to learn this, and should invest time in this early on, else you'll develop chicken wings and teacup fingers.


2: Have a real drummer help set up your kit. He'll explain what goes where, and why. Take notes, pictures, and measurements until you can break down and set up on your own. Have him help you with tuning. Have him make sure you're holding the stick correctly. Have him make sure you're striking the drums/cymbals correctly.

3: Practice to a metronome/pulse.

4: Learn the basics of reading music. You don't have to sight-read. You don't have to know the full breadth of intricacies. You should be able to look at a 16th-note rhythm and hash it out in your head, and play it. It honestly only takes a week to get there. You'll pick up the rest as you go, almost by accident.

5: Get a tutor/teacher. It can be as infrequent as once a month. Keep track of the things you're struggling with, and bring them to your teacher's attention. Tell him not to be nice to you, as the purpose is to fix your broken drumming and not have your ego stroked for $50 an hour.

6: Spend enough time having fun that it motivates you to continue playing. Beginning on drums can be a drag. Nothing sucks the fun out of anything more than an academics. Fight the power.

Early on, you'll find that there's a lot of pragmatic study to be done. Once you learn the fundamentals, it becomes much more free-form. The bottom line is that you need to know how to hold/use the sticks, communicate rhythms with others on (digital) paper, and sort out any bad habits before they become permanent.
What KamaK said. Stick control, getting a teacher and a metronome. And have fun!
__________________
Yamaha Club Custom 2001 20/14/14/12/10
Ludwig Acro 1974
Sabian HHX, AAX, XS20, Zildjian Cust Hyb
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-23-2014, 01:48 AM
Cheese
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: A new drummer

Hi,

I'm by no means a teacher by trade but I do know what worked for me personally and may or may not work for others -:

well my advice is to listen to lots of music, yes any type of music, and try to play what not only the drummer might be playing but the rhythm of say the sax player for example, you'll see how good they are at it and will really help you get away from playing 'boring fills'. try not to see the tempo of the song as something that makes you phrase fills on where the beat of the song is, play off the beat too as long as you start and finish in the right place it doesn't matter, even if it confuses the hell out of people, again this makes the playing sound much better with practice of course. I try not to repeat myself too much also.
you can go in any direction, you don't have to go round the toms in any set order.

Going back to what I was saying about playing off the beat, if you take just one bar of 44, no matter where you play the beat in that bar its still technically 'in time' so this is then applied to several bars and when done right it is really useful, obviously. you cant play anything but it is useful, as I say this is used a lot on melodic instruments but not a lot in drums.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-23-2014, 04:14 AM
uhtrinity's Avatar
uhtrinity uhtrinity is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 218
Default Re: A new drummer

Quote:
Originally Posted by KamaK View Post
If you're just beginning.

1: Invest part of your practice time into stick control. There's a book called "Stick Control" that's great but pretty dry. If you're looking for web freebies, use Vic's lessons.. You absolutely need to learn this, and should invest time in this early on, else you'll develop chicken wings and teacup fingers.
Thanks for the link, even though I have been playing for a long time I have some bad, or under developed techniques. Based on his grip and rebound lesson I use too much wrist and not enough fingers. Looks like I have some homework, hopefully it will help on my fluidity of double strokes as well as raw speed.

Edit: Could someone watch and confirm what I am thinking. Here is one of our songs performed live from a few months ago. It uses a straight rock beat with mostly 16th note fills. A problem that I have had is lack of controlled rebound which limits double strokes on all but the snare and smallest toms, but even those aren't as clean as I would like. I also fatigue when when doing fast single handed eighth notes on something like the high hat at 175 bpm. Am I using too much wrist?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdKG...38iicwIVqAse1A
__________________
Facebook

Last edited by uhtrinity; 07-23-2014 at 04:30 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-23-2014, 12:59 PM
Cheese
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: A new drummer

Don't get caught up in rudiments, they can help but be aware that there just patterns and there is millions of possible patterns, Id practice listening then playing music parts that way you learn the hand independence and learn other stuff too, rather than sitting with a sheet of rudiments, again this is what I did/do and this may not work for everybody but its worth a try. When you're playing other music on drums you'll come across loads of patterns , also when you learn something, use it to make your own patterns too, they wont have a name like rudiments do but they don't need one.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-23-2014, 01:13 PM
Pocket-full-of-gold's Avatar
Pocket-full-of-gold Pocket-full-of-gold is offline
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Melbourne, Australia.
Posts: 11,360
Default Re: A new drummer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheese View Post
Don't get caught up in rudiments, they can help but be aware that there just patterns and there is millions of possible patterns, Id practice listening then playing music parts that way you learn the hand independence and learn other stuff too, rather than sitting with a sheet of rudiments, again this is what I did/do and this may not work for everybody but its worth a try. When you're playing other music on drums you'll come across loads of patterns , also when you learn something, use it to make your own patterns too, they wont have a name like rudiments do but they don't need one.
I think you're missing the point.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-23-2014, 01:55 PM
Cheese
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: A new drummer

Rudiments are made from single and double strokes, they can be at different dynamics too, for example 'drags/ruffs' A 5/9 stroke roll for example is similar.

You don't want to be thinking in terms of 'heres a 5 stroke , and there's a 9 stroke'
you should really hear how different patterns from bands playing sound and then practice them on the drums. this way (do this as much as you can) you learn the hand co ordination, but develop the ear too..

This is why I can play from memory really well, I hear a pattern and can copy it.
I learned loads of rush drum parts but other artists will work too, I did learn from other bands too of course, and back then I didn't even have a proper drumkit until 2 years later.

I haven't got a clue what the rudiments are called or even the sticking but if I hear one id be able to play it now. and often do without thinking about it

EDIT:
also try not to phrase a rhythm of a fill to the beat/tempo, if I have a bar, or so to play something no matter when about's I play a single note it isn't out of time, as long as you finish and start somewhere logical, this is kinda what melodic instruments do more often but it good for solos and fills on drums. Maybe it will clash with the rest of the instruments , it depends, try t maybe with just a Clave pattern as a backing track, there's plenty of freedom then.

Last edited by Cheese; 07-24-2014 at 12:34 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-24-2014, 04:41 PM
wy yung
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: A new drummer

I noticed someone said Stick control is dry. IMO it depends on one's approach.

Patterns in 8th notes begin on page 5 and continue over three pages. To simply work through these pages can certainly be dull. However there is no reason to restrict oneself to this.

Stick control is based on a formula that continues through the book. The first 7 exercises can be used to look through the book to see how the y reoccur. This then helps to understand how the sections work.

One can do exercises 1 through 7 on page 5, then move to the 8th notes into 8th note triplets and then 16ths in order to get a variety happening.

In my experience the book is only as dry as one's imagination.

I recommend finding a good teacher. Good luck.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Bernhard Castiglioni's DRUMMERWORLD.com